Wednesday Talk Radio

Episode Archive

Embracing the Willamette River with Will Levenson

Air date: 
Wed, 07/09/2014 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Embracing the Willamette River with Will Levenson

Host Lisa Loving speaks with Will Levenson about his life’s work of getting more Portlanders to embrace the Willamette River as a recreation spot, part of the larger movement to get more people involved in the push to really clean up the river.

Check out Poetry at the Beach, (a Public Art installation of children’s poetry), at Poet’s Beach.  The nonprofit Human Access Project received permission from the Army Corp of Engineers, Department of State Lands and the City of Portland to install a new trail to an otherwise sandy beach right in downtown Portland.

Harris Zafar on "Demystifying Islam: Tackling Tough Questions"

Air date: 
Wed, 07/02/2014 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Harris Zafar on "Demystifying Islam: Tackling Tough Questions"

Guest host Lisa Loving speaks with Harris Zafar, Portland-based author of the new book, "Demystifying Islam: Tackling Tough Questions."  Harris Zafar is a lecturer, writer, teacher and the National Spokesperson & Director of Youth Outreach | Ahmadiyya Muslim Community USA.

Despite heightened interest in the study of the Muslim faith, for many people Islam remains shrouded in mystery and confusion. What really is Shariah law? How is a Muslim to understand Jihad? Does Islam oppose Western values such as free speech or freedom of religion? What place do women have according to Islam?

Are we living in a corporatist-fascist society? If so, what then?

Air date: 
Wed, 06/25/2014 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Host Paul Roland talks with author and social/political analyst Norman Pollack
Norman Pollack is the author of “The Populist Response to Industrial America” (Harvard) and “The Just Polity” (Illinois), Guggenheim Fellow, and professor of history emeritus, Michigan State University.  His interests are social theory and the structural analysis of capitalism and fascism. He is a frequent contributor to the Counterpunch website. Some of his articles on U.S. fascism include:

Host Paul Roland: let's talk about KBOO's role in Portland and the region

Air date: 
Wed, 06/18/2014 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
What can KBOO do to have a stronger presence and be a more powerful force for change?

Call in at 503-231-8187

Infill and Gentrification

Air date: 
Wed, 06/11/2014 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Infill and Gentrification

Paul Roland speaks with John Lang of the Red and Black Cafe about infill and gentrification. Your calls welcome at 503 231-8187.

Wednesday Talk Radio on 06/04/14

Air date: 
Wed, 06/04/2014 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
News & commentary on local, national and international issues - we invite your calls at 503-231-8187

Wednesday Talk Radio on 05/28/14

Air date: 
Wed, 05/28/2014 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
News & commentary on local, national and international issues - we invite your calls at 503-231-8187

Host Paul Roland with guest Jacqueline Keeler on racist stereotypes, sports mascots and more

Air date: 
Wed, 05/21/2014 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
A social media campaign has amplified attention to the widespread stigmatization of Native Americans

Native Americans have been calling for the end to the use of racist stereotypes and sports mascots for decades, with some slow and steady progress. Many schools have retired their Native mascots, and laws (as in Oregon) have been passed banning them. Yet powerful franchises like the Washington Redskins, Atlanta Braves and Cleveland Indians have firmly resisted any change or recognition that anything is wrong with their team names and mascots.

5/14 - Banning GMO's in Jackson County

Air date: 
Wed, 05/14/2014 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Banning GMO's in Jackson County

Sam Bouman hosts a look at the attempt by a consortium of organic farmers to have GMO's banned in the county. The measure's opponents have amassed an unprecedented 900 thousand dollars in campaign contributions from mostly out-of-state interests including Monsanto, Dupont, and Syngenta.

May Day! May Day! Host: Paul Roland

Air date: 
Wed, 04/30/2014 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Tomas and Ash from the Portland IWW join Paul to talk about the history and meaning of May Day

May Day's ancient origin as a celebration of the earth's fecundity and the beginning of summer and its modern incarnation as an international worker's day may not seem to have much in common. But they are linked by the rise of industrial capitalism, which has on the one hand uprooted  masses of people from the land and its cycles and sustenance, and on the other forced most people to depend on an alienating system of wages, rents, interest and profits that benefits a relative few. Movements throughout history, from the Diggers in England to the early socialist comunes to the 60's counterculture to the radical environmental movement have in various degrees combined a return to direct connection to the land with a resistance to the alien system of Capital.


Personal and social resiliency in the face of an uncertain future

program date: 
Wed, 08/12/2015
Host Paul Roland speaks with guest John Daggett about the theory and practice of Resiliency. In the face of climate chaos and economic breakdown, we need to become more resilient, both personally and socially. Daggett draws upon a long career in teaching, school administration and active participation in community and school resilience projects.  

Building on the seminal work on resilient chldren of Emmy Werner and Ruth Smith (Vulnerable but Invincilbe,Overcoming the Odds) and of Nan Henderson and Mile Milstein (Resiliency in the Schools), Daggett has both taught resiliency and assisted in the founding of BARC (Building a Resilient Community) in Ashland, OR. 

Links/resources mentioned on show:

  • Length: 55:30 minutes (76.23 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 192Kbps (CBR)

Against the Fossil-fueled Patriarchal Death Cult

program date: 
Wed, 08/05/2015

More conversation of the deranged fossil fuel machine that has us all in its death grip. Call-ins on the ShellNo action last week and relections on the "nature of the beast."

Opening and closing song: "The Oil Song 2010" by Steve Forbert:

To get involved and contribute to ongoing campaigns against the fossil fuel machine and global climate change:

Some of the articles mentioned on the program:



program date: 
Wed, 07/08/2015
Guest host Doug McVay speaks with Haven Wheelock, syringe exchange program coordinator with Outside In, about harm reduction, overdose prevention, and local efforts to reduce the risk of HIV/AIDS and hepatitis transmission among injection drug users.
  • Length: 62:02 minutes (85.19 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 192Kbps (CBR)

One Flaming Arrow: Inter-Tribal Art, Music & Film Festival

program date: 
Wed, 06/03/2015
One Flaming Arrow is an Inter-tribal, Indigenous Art, Music & Film festival happening from June 2nd-14th of 2015 in various venues throughout Portland, Oregon. One Flaming Arrowemerged as a collaboration between local business entrepreneur, Carlee Smith and the artist collective RISE: Radical, Indigenous, Survivance, & Empowerment’s Demian DinéYazhí (Diné) and Kaila Farrell-Smith (Klamath-Modoc)
One Flaming Arrow's goal is to promote, empower, educate, persevere, and heal through the creative and political act of contemporary Indigenous Survivance. One Flaming Arrowaccomplishes its goals by bringing emerging, experimental, and established contemporary artists showing within museums to experimental art exhibitions on reclaimed Indigenous land.

Demian DinéYazhi’ is a Portland-based transdisciplinary warrior born to the clans Tódích'íí'nii (Bitter Water) and Naasht'ézhí Tábąąhá  (Water's Edge) of the Diné (Navajo). DinéYazhi' received his BFA in Intermedia Arts from Pacific Northwest College of Art in 2014. Demian's work as an artist can be understood through the lens of curatorial inquiry, zine production, street interventions, education, workshops, and transdisciplinary methods of art production. His work is rooted in Radical Indigenous Queer Feminist politics, landscape representation, memory formation, HIV/AIDS-related art and activism, gender and sexuality, Indigenous Survivance, and Decolonization. He is the founder and director of the artist/activist/warrior collective, RISE: Radical Indigenous Survivance & Empowerment, which is dedicated to the education and perseverance of Indigenous art and culture.
  • Length: 56:51 minutes (78.07 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 192Kbps (CBR)

There is a war.....on the houseless, going on right now in Portland

program date: 
Wed, 05/27/2015

Host Paul Roland talks about the "homeless sweeps" currently underway by the Portland Police in inner Southeast Portland, in the context of the endless social war. After the opening song by Leonard Cohen, he reads from The Invisible Committee's "To Our Friends" comunique of last year.
He then takes calls from the listeners....

To get involved in the campaign against the "sweeps," go to

Leonard Cohen, 
"There Is A War"
There is a war between the rich and poor, 
a war between the man and the woman. 
There is a war between the ones who say there is a war 
and the ones who say there isn't. 
Why don't you come on back to the war, that's right, get in it, 
why don't you come on back to the war, it's just beginning. 

Well I live here with a woman and a child, 
the situation makes me kind of nervous. 
Yes, I rise up from her arms, she says "I guess you call this love"; 
I call it service. 

Why don't you come on back to the war, don't be a tourist, 
why don't you come on back to the war, before it hurts us, 
why don't you come on back to the war, let's all get nervous. 

You cannot stand what I've become, 
you much prefer the gentleman I was before. 
I was so easy to defeat, I was so easy to control, 
I didn't even know there was a war. 

Why don't you come on back to the war, don't be embarrassed, 
why don't you come on back to the war, you can still get married. 

There is a war between the rich and poor, 
a war between the man and the woman. 
There is a war between the left and right, 
a war between the black and white, 
a war between the odd and the even. 

Why don't you come on back to the war, pick up your tiny burden, 
why don't you come on back to the war, let's all get even, 
why don't you come on back to the war, can't you hear me speaking?

Rethinking electroshock

program date: 
Wed, 05/20/2015

Marcia Meyers of Rethinking Psychiatry and electroshock survivor Deborah Schwartzkopff are today's guests.


Also, check out these previous KBOO news features on the subject:

Special Guest Ralph Nader on his new book and the current state of U.S. politics

program date: 
Wed, 05/13/2015
Join host Paul Roland, this week featuring long-time activist, organizer, political reformer and Third Party proponent Ralph Nader.

Nader's new book, just out on Seven Stories Press, is Return to Sender, a long series of letters to Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama, all of which went unanswered. 

  • Length: 42:14 minutes (57.99 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 192Kbps (CBR)

Guest Chris Hedges on his new book: "Wages of Rebellion: The Moral Imperative of Revolt"

program date: 
Wed, 05/06/2015
From seminarian to New York Times journalist to one of the leading social critics on the left to (just last year) ordained Presbyterian minister, Chris Hedges remains as provocative and insightful as ever with his twefth book: "Wages of Rebellion: The Moral Imperative of Revolt," due out next week.

Enjoy the conversation with membership "pitches" edited out!
From the blurb for his new book:

Revolutions come in waves and cycles. We are again riding the crest of a revolutionary epic, much like 1848 or 1917, from the Arab Spring to movements against austerity in Greece to the Occupy movement. In 
Wages of Rebellion, Chris Hedges—who has chronicled the malaise and sickness of a society in terminal moral decline in his books Empire of Illusion and Death of the Liberal Class—investigates what social and psychological factors cause revolution, rebellion, and resistance. Drawing on an ambitious overview of prominent philosophers, historians, and literary figures he shows not only the harbingers of a coming crisis but also the nascent seeds of rebellion. Hedges’ message is clear: popular uprisings in the United States and around the world are inevitable in the face of environmental destruction and wealth polarization.

Focusing on the stories of rebels from around the world and throughout history, Hedges investigates what it takes to be a rebel in modern times. Utilizing the work of Reinhold Niebuhr, Hedges describes the motivation that guides the actions of rebels as “sublime madness” — the state of passion that causes the rebel to engage in an unavailing fight against overwhelmingly powerful and oppressive forces. For Hedges, resistance is carried out not for its success, but as a moral imperative that affirms life. Those who rise up against the odds will be those endowed with this “sublime madness.”

From South African activists who dedicated their lives to ending apartheid, to contemporary anti-fracking protests in Alberta, Canada, to whistleblowers in pursuit of transparency, Wages of Rebellion shows the cost of a life committed to speaking the truth and demanding justice. Hedges has penned an indispensable guide to rebellion.

Articles mentioned during the program:
"Make the Rich Panic"

"Why We Need Professional Revolutionists"

  • Length: 45:01 minutes (41.22 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Why police unions are a big problem

program date: 
Wed, 04/29/2015
Violent, too-often lethal and racist police behavior continues to be in the public spotlight with the recent outrage in Baltimore. Although public discussion of the role of police unions in protecting cops from both internal discipline and criminal prosecution has increased over the past year since the events in Ferguson, there is still relatively little movement among progressives and organized labor to seriously address this issue. 

On February 4, Wednesday Talk Radio Host Paul Roland organized a special two hour  "Forum on police unions and their role in the culture of police violence in the United States," ( the participation of national and local labor activists, lawyers, academics and police critics. He had hoped to spur a wider debate in the Portland progressive movement. Whether or not this has actually occurred is difficult to assess, but anyway, with this program he's trying once again to stimulate some debate. And you're invited!!

This May Day is also the 15th anniversary of the 2000 Portland May Day police riot. The historic role of the police as protectors of the Status Quo was all too evident there as in so many other occasions of public protest and dissent. Police Unions have always had a double role of guaranteeing workplace safety, adequate wages and benefits for their members but at the same time maintaining the political and social power and preventing civilian oversight of the police. Is this an unresolvable contradiction? Should police unions exist at all? Should they have strict limits placed on their ability to wield their unique position as armed enforcers of social order? 

Portland Police Association Labor Agreement:
Recent articles on police unions from around the country:

Portland activist and author ("Our Enemies in Blue: Police and Power in America") has a website:
Other relevant articles:

More links to articles on KBOO page for February's "Forum on police unions.."

"Why the Mountain": a struggle for autonomy, dignity and tradition on Mauna Kea in Hawaii

program date: 
Wed, 04/22/2015
Native Hawaiian protestors have halted construction of a massive 18-story telescope on their sacred, life-giving Mauna Kea. While the protest is about stopping the continued desecration and damage to a mountain central to their culture, beliefs and traditions, it is also about an ongoing movement for independence and decolonization. Filmmaker Anne Keala Kelly has been documenting and involved in this struggle for many years. She joins host Paul Roland by phone to counter misleading and superficial news reporting of the issue on mainstream media and to give us the latest news from the front lines. 

 From her  her nohohewa website (below): 

Anne Keala Kelly is a Hawaiian filmmaker who documented the Hawaiian sovereignty movement during the first decade of the 21st century. As a journalist, she has covered hawaiian and other indigenous peoples' issues and the environment, and in 2006-7 whe was a Ted Scripps Fellow in Boulder, CO at the Center for Environmental Journalism. She has filed stories from Hawaii, where she lives, as well as Geneva and katmandu for the pacifica Network's free Speech Radio News. Her print journalism has appeared in "The Naton," "Indian Country Today," "The Honoluly Weekly," and elsewhere, and her video reporting has been featured on The Newshour with jhim Lehrer and Democracy Now! In September 2008, Keala co-produced "The other Hawaii" for Al Jazeera. She has an MFA in Directing from UCLA.

For more information about her and her films, go to:
People mentioned on program include:  Professor Williamson Chang, who sent a letter to Atty. General Eric Holder asking him to consider whether or not the US is guilty of War Crimes in Hawaii, specifically the crime of pillaging via the illegal taxation of Hawaiians and others; Keanu Sai, who has done important research on Hawaiian history and the US occupation. 

Groups in Hawaii:
We Are Mauna Kea

Local Hawaiian cultural organization (based in Vancouver, WA): 
They are offering an 8-week course in Hawaiian History on Tuesdays from 7-9 p.m. starting May 5. Call or write Kepule: 503-580-6662,

Article on how people can help the cause:

Wednesday Talk Radio host Paul Roland can be reached at
  • Length: 58:50 minutes (80.79 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 192Kbps (CBR)


Copyright © 2012 KBOO Community Radio | Copyright Policy | Community Guidelines | Website Illustration & Design by: KMF ILLUSTRATION