Clayton Morgareidge's blog

Not Enough Jobs?

   

The Supreme Court and Corporate Speech

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Clayton Morgareidge for the Old Mole Variety Hour

Terrorism: Motive & Solidarity

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Clayton Morgareidge, for the Old Mole Variety Hour, January 4, 2010

 In a violent world, where violence provokes more violence, there are enemies everywhere. Powerful nations create enemies among the less powerful and among their people. Thus our war on, and of, terror. 

There are two very different ways of thinking about our enemies – about people who want to do us in. One way is the way we treat garden pests: figure out how to identify them and then how to either fence them out or destroy them. In the case of human enemies, we can also hope that our methods inspire enough fear to deter them from doing what they want to do. This approach is energized by hatred because killing people comes more easily to us if we hate those we are killing. Then our killing is a natural part of how we feel – angry and afraid.   We don’t have to understand the motives of our enemies: it’s enough to call them evil or crazy. 

Is Hell Other People?

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Obama’s Dilemmas

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Getting Over Death

Getting Over Death
Clayton Morgareidge for the Old Mole Variety Hour, August 24, 2009
Audio version

An Illusion about Taxes

 Clayton Morgareidge, for the Old Mole Variety Hour, July 20, 2009

A Society of Exclusion

What draws people into a politics of hatred – not just the killers who have made the news lately in Witchita and at the Holocaust Museum, but all those whose primary political motive is hostility against cultures and ethnicities different from their own?

Let’s approach this question by going back to basics: What do human beings really want? If we knew that, we might know what people are really after when they do crazy things, and perhaps we would know what to do about it.

The Biology of Progressive Politics

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The  Biology of Progressive Politics
Clayton Morgareidge, Old Mole Variety Hour
March 2, 2009


The rhetoric of the Obama presidency is a lot more progressive than anything we’ve ever heard coming out of the White House.  The new administration is still taking shape, and so is the  way it is perceived by the public and the media.  So now is a special time when we should be pressing for the most progressive agenda we can come up with.  To do so, we should first try to be clear about the philosophical underpinnings of a progressive agenda.

The political left is inspired by its sense that although we are individuals, human life is deeply social.  We are social beings not just because we have to have rules of the road in order to not to crash into each other as we compete for scarce resources.   We do not just live next to each other: we live our lives within the lives of other people. Together we construct the forms of life that make each individual life possible, meaningful and desirable.  How others talk and think and write and paint and sing and build creates the horizons of what I can see and do.  How others organize and implement personal and family relationships creates the world in which I will love and hate and fear and hope.  The ways in which production and distribution are carried out determines my opportunities for being productive, secure, and comfortable.  Human life is never merely individual or personal.  There is no way for us not to be interested, and emotionally invested, in what other people do.

Going Beyond National Health Care

Public Health: Beyond Obama
December  29, 2008

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