Between the Covers

A weekly show featuring interviews with locally and nationally known authors of both fiction and non-fiction.

Coming Soon

Midnight in Broad Daylight: A Japanese American Family Caught Between Two Worlds
The Other Side by Lacy M. Johnson
The Moor's Account by Laila Lalami
 

Episode Archive

Portland Author Margaret Malone: People Like You

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 11/12/2015 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Margaret Malone: People Like You

Between the Covers welcomes Portland author Margaret Malone to celebrate the launch of her debut short story collection, People Like You, published by local press Atelier26.

Colum McCann on "Thirteen Ways of Looking," his new short story collection

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 11/05/2015 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Colum McCann on "Thirteen Ways of Looking," his new short story collection

Host Kathleen Stephenson speaks with Colum McCann about Thirteen Ways of Looking, a new short story collection – the first in 12 years –  from the National Book Award–winning author. In the title novella, a retired judge reflects on his life’s work, unaware as he goes about his daily routines that this particular morning will be his last.

Gutshot by Amelia Gray

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 10/29/2015 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Gutshot by Amelia Gray

Right on time for Halloween, a conversation with Amelia Gray.  "Reading Gutshot is a little like being blindfolded and pelted from all sides with fire, Jell-O and the occasional live animal. You'll be messy at the end and slightly beaten up, but surprised and certainly entertained . . . She pushes against the outer limits of what humans can and will do. She seems to be testing her readers, too. Will you come with me here? How about if I take it a little further? Are you still game? (Ramona Ausubel The New York Times Book Review).  David Naimon hosts.

T. Geronimo Johnson on his novel, "Welcome to Braggsville"

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 10/22/2015 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
T. Geronimo Johnson on his novel, "Welcome to Braggsville"

Host Kathleen Stephenson speaks with PEN/Faulkner finalist T. Geronimo Johnson about his novel Welcome to Braggsville, a dark and socially provocative Southern-fried comedy about four UC Berkeley students who stage a dramatic protest during a Civil War reenactment. A literary coming-of-age novel, Welcome to Braggsville, reminds us of the promise and perils of youthful exuberance, while painting an indelible portrait of contemporary America.

Lauren Groff on her new novel "Fates and Furies"

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 10/15/2015 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Lauren Groff on her new novel "Fates and Furies"

Host Dave Mazza interviews Lauren Groff, award-winning author of The Monsters of Templeton and Arcadia, about her new book, Fates and Furies, an exhilarating novel about marriage, creativity, art, and perception. Fates and Furies is an examination of a marriage and a portrait of a creative partnership.

Lauren Groff is the author of the novel The Monsters of Templeton, shortlisted for the Orange Prize for New Writers, Delicate Edible Birds, a collection of stories, and Arcadia, a New York Times Notable Book, winner of the Medici Book Club Prize, and finalist for the L.A. Times Book Award.

Elizabeth Gilbert, BIG MAGIC: Creative Living Beyond Fear

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 10/08/2015 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Elizabeth Gilbert, Author of BIG MAGIC

Between the Covers welcomes international bestselling author Elizabeth Gilbert, to discuss her new book, BIG MAGIC:  Creative Living Beyond Fear.

Elizabeth Gilbert is a versatile and creatively boundless author of works of fiction, non-fiction, short stories, a cookbook, and memoirs, including the global phenomenon, EAT, PRAY, LOVE.

In her latest offering, BIG MAGIC: Creative Living Beyond Fear, it might appear that she has branched into self-help books as well, though in the view of the author it is more of an exploration of creativity, by someone who sincerely enjoys thinking and talking about the subject.

Steering the Craft: A Twenty-First-Century Guide to Sailing the Sea of Story by Ursula K. Le Guin

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 10/01/2015 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Steering the Craft: A Twenty-First-Century Guide to Sailing the Sea of Story by Ursula K. Le Guin

Ursula K. Le Guin has published more than sixty books of fiction, fantasy, science fiction, children’s literature, poetry, drama, criticism, and translation. Among her honors are a National Book Award, a PEN/Malamud Award for short fiction, five Hugo and five Nebula Awards, twenty-one Locus Awards,and the National Book Foundation’s Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. She speaks with host David Naimon about her book Steering The Craft.  Completely revised and rewritten to address the challenges and opportunities of the modern era, this guide to the craft of writing lays out ten chapters that address the most fundamental components of narrative, from the sound of language to sentence construction to point of view.

Baby's On Fire by Liz Prato

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 09/24/2015 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Baby's On Fire by Liz Prato

Host David Naimon talks with Portland writer, teacher and editor, Liz Prato, about her debut collection of stories Baby's On Fire.  Writer Steve Almond describes the collection well:  "Liz Prato's stories are filled with the lost, the lonely, and the damned, and she makes all of them sing with a haunting grandeur. Baby's on Fire is a lamentation brimming with wit, candor, and the eternal possibility of mercy."

The Dying Grass by William T. Vollmann

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 09/17/2015 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
The Dying Grass by William T. Vollmann
Host Ken Jones talks with William T. Vollmann, author of 10 novels, 4 collections of short fiction, a memoir, 6 works of non-fiction (including the 7-volume treatise on violence, Rising Up and Rising Down), and numerous articles. His latest work is The Dying Grass: A Novel of the Nez Perce War, which is Book 5 in his Seven Dreams series of historical fiction.
 
Jane Smiley wrote in her New York Times review of the book: “Vollmann is one of the most idiosyncratic and challenging novelists at work today. The Dying Grass, like his other works, daringly pushes at the edges of the novel as a form, while at the same time demanding that the reader sit up and pay attention.”

Patsy Kullberg on her Novel, "Girl in the River"

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 09/10/2015 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Patsy Kullberg on her Novel, "Girl in the River"

We speak with local writer Patsy Kullberg about her new novel, Girl in the River, a portrait of the intimate lives of women during one of the most corrupt periods in Portland history. It’s the middle of the twentieth century and Portland has fallen into the hands of gangsters. Newly orphaned Mae Rose is on the lam from a knife wielding pimp, mustering her own worst impulses to survive, while Dr. Ruth Barnett, queen of Portland’s nightlife, runs a lucrative abortion service. After the war, both women are caught in the cross hairs of anti-vice crusader Dottie “Do-good” Lee. But Mayor Lee’s DA-in-pursuit has his own dirty little reasons to track Mae down.

Audio

William Gibson on Science Fiction and Zero History

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 01/27/2011

Host Marianne Barisonek interviews William Gibson, whose novel Neuromancer launched the cyberpunk generation. They discuss his latest novel, ZeroHistory

www.williamgibsonbooks.com/

  • Length: 26:50 minutes (24.57 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

David Vann on his novel of drama and pathos in Alaska: "Caribou Island"

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 01/20/2011

Host Marianne Barisonek speaks with David Vann about his debut novel Caribou Island. Set on a small island in a glacier-fed lake on Alaska's Kenai Peninsula Caribou Island captures the drama and pathos of a husband and wife whose bitter love, failed dreams, and tragic past push them to the edge of destruction.

David Vann is the prize-winning author of Legend of a Suicidel. A former National Endowment for the Arts Fellow, Wallace Stegner Fellow, and John L'Heureux Fellow, David Vann has taught at Stanford, Cornell, SF State, FSU, and is currently an Associate Professor at the University of San Francisco. He was born on Adak Island, Alaska and lives in the SF Bay Area with his wife Nancy.

Anthony Doerr on his latest book of stories: "Memory Wall"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 01/13/2011

Host David Naimon speaks with writer Anthony Doerr about his latest book, Memory Wall. Doerr is the author of three other books, The Shell CollectorAbout Grace, andFour Seasons in Rome.

Doerr’s short fiction has won three O. Henry Prizes and has been anthologized in The Best American Short StoriesThe Anchor Book of New American Short Stories, and The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Fiction. He has won the Barnes & Noble Discover Prize, the Rome Prize, the New York Public Library’s Young Lions Fiction Award, aGuggenheim Fellowship, an NEA Fellowship, the National Magazine Award for Fiction, two Pushcart Prizes, the Pacific Northwest Book Award, and two Ohioana Book Awards. His books have twice been a New York Times Notable Book, an American Library Association Book of the Year, and made lots of other year end “Best Of” lists. In 2007, the British literary magazine Granta placed Doerr on its list of 21 Best Young American novelists.

Doerr lives in Boise, Idaho with his wife and two sons. He teaches now and then in the low-residency MFA program at Warren Wilson College in North Carolina. His book reviews have appeared in the New York Times and Der Spiegel, and he writes a regular column on science books for the Boston Globe.

http://www.anthonydoerr.com 

 

Kenneth Sharpe - "Practical Wisdom: The Right Way to Do the Right Thing"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 01/06/2011

Host Kathleen Stephenson speaks with Kenneth Sharpe, co-author with Barry Schwartz of Practical Wisdom: The Right Way to Do the Right Thing. In the book, Schwartz and Sharpe make a reasoned appeal for wisdom in a world gone mad with ineffectual rules and rampant bureaucracy: from doctors too bogged down with insurance paperwork and quotas to give patients the time they deserve, to teachers too focused on standardized tests to ensure that their students are really learning.

Kenneth Sharpe has been teaching political philosophy (aka political theory) at Swarthmore College since the early 1970s. He has authored five books and completed research on how institutions and organizations--corporations, NGOs, government agencies--work. Kenneth has taught and led public lectures on practical wisdom in the workplace, professional ethics, learning in organizations, social policy and U.S. foreign policy. His most recent book is Practical Wisdom: The Right Way to Do the Right Thing(Penguin/Riverhead 2010) co-authored with Barry Schwartz.

Ed Goldberg speaks with Steve Berry, author of "The Emperor's Tomb"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 12/23/2010

Host Ed Goldberg speaks with Steve Berry, author of "The Emperor's Tomb," a thriller about the internal politics of China and the politics of oil.

Novelist Nicole Krauss discusses "The Great House"

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 12/16/2010

Host David Naimon speaks with Nicole Krauss about her newest novel, The Great House, which tells a story haunted by questions: What do we pass on to our children and how do they absorb our dreams and losses? How do we respond to disappearance, destruction, and change?

"The Great House" was a finalist for the National Book Award for fiction this year.

Nicole Krauss is also the author of the international bestseller The History of Love, which won the William Saroyan International Prize for Writing, France’s Prix du Meilleur Livre Ėtranger, was named #1 book of the year by Amazon.com, and was short-listed for the Orange, Médicis, and Femina prizes. In 2007, she was selected as one of Granta’s Best Young American Novelists, and in 2010 The New Yorker named her one of the 20 best writers under 40. 

 

Grace Paley Birthday Memorial Tribute

program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 12/09/2010

Writer, poet and activist Grace Paley's birthday is December 11 (born in 1922, she died in 2007). In honor of Grace Paley Between the Covers presents an interview with local author Judith Arcana, who is Grace Paley's biographer, as well as parts of memorial show produced by KBOO's Circle A Radio Collective on December 5th, 2007.  We’ll also hear archival recordings of Grace Paley reading her work.

  • Length: 28:49 minutes (26.38 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Mystery writer Jeffery Deaver discusses "The Burning Wire"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 12/02/2010

 Host Ed Goldberg speaks with mystery writer Jeffery Deaver about his book, The Burning Wire, a thriller about a killer who uses the New York electric grid as a weapon.

A former journalist, folksinger and attorney, Jeffery Deaver is an international number-one bestselling author. His novels have appeared on bestseller lists around the world, including The New York Times, The Times of London, Italy's Corriere della Serra, The Sydney Morning Heraldand The Los Angeles Times. His books are sold in 150 countries and translated into 25 languages. The author of twenty-seven novels, two collections of short stories and a nonfiction law book, he's received or been shortlisted for a number of awards around the world. His The Bodies Left Behind was named Novel of the Year by the International Thriller Writers Association, and his Lincoln Rhyme thriller The Broken Window was also nominated for that prize. He has been awarded the Steel Dagger and Short Story Dagger from the British Crime Writers' Association and the Nero Wolfe Award, and he is a three-time recipient of the Ellery Queen Reader's Award for Best Short Story of the Year and a winner of the British Thumping Good Read Award. The Cold Moonwas recently named the Book of the Year by the Mystery Writers Association of Japan, as well as by Kono Mystery Wa Sugoi magazine. In addition, the Japanese Adventure Fiction Association awarded the book their annual Grand Prix award.
     Deaver has been nominated for six Edgar Awards from the Mystery Writers of America, an Anthony Award and a Gumshoe Award. He was recently shortlisted for the ITV3 Crime Thriller Award for Best International Author.
     His book A Maiden's Grave was made into an HBO movie starring James Garner and Marlee Matlin. His novel The Bone Collector was a feature release from Universal Pictures, starring Denzel Washington and Angelina Jolie. His thriller,The Devil's Teardrop, was made into a TV movie by the Lifetime network, starring Natasha Henstridge, Tom Everett Scott, and Rena Sofer. 
     His most recent books are EdgeThe Burning WireRoadside CrossesThe Bodies Left BehindThe Broken Window,The Sleeping Doll and More Twisted: Collected Stories, Volume II. And, yes, the rumors are true, he did appear as a corrupt reporter on his favorite soap opera, As the World Turns.
    Deaver is presently alternating his series featuring Kathryn Dance, who will make her appearances in odd-number years, with that starring Lincoln Rhyme, who will appear in even. 
     Ian Fleming Publications LTD has chosen Jeff to write a new James Bond book, currently titled Project X, to be released on May 28, 2011, Ian Fleming's birthday.

 

Between the Covers on 11/25/10

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 11/25/2010

Host Ed Goldberg interviews Northwest writer Patrick McManus about his new book, "The Huckleberry Murders," a tale of murder and greed in rural Idaho.

"The Huckleberry Murders" is the fourth Bo Tully mystery. The 43-year-old Blight County, Idaho, sheriff is headed for his favorite remote spot to pick huckleberries when five frantic women inform him that they've spotted bodies nearby.

Patrick McManus wrote for "Field and Stream" and "Outdoor Life" for over forty years.

He has written many hundreds of humor pieces, including most recently the “The Last Laugh” column for Outdoor Life Magazine.  His humor pieces have been collected in 13 books. He has also written a children’s book, Kid Camping from Aaaiii! To Zip! and a book on the writing of humor, The Deer on A Bicycle.  Recently, he has started writing mystery novels: The Blight Way (2006),  Avalanche (2007), and The Double-Jack Murders (due out in October  2009), all three published by Simon & Schuster.  With his sister, Patricia Gass, he wrote a memoir/cookbook, titled Whatchagot Stew. He has written four one-man stage plays, widely performed by actor Tim Behrens in both the United States and Canada. 

Pat has received numerous awards, including Centennial Scholar from Washington State University and the Trustees Medal from Eastern Washington University.

  • Length: 26:34 minutes (18.25 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 96Kbps (CBR)

Skip Horack discusses his novel: "The Eden Hunter"

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 11/18/2010

Ed Goldberg interviews Skip Horack on his recent novel, The Eden Hunter.   "In 1816, five years after being captured and sold into slavery, Kau, a pygmy tribesman, flees south into the Spanish Florida wilderness, determined to find a place where he can once again live in harmony with nature. Both haunted and driven by his memories of Africa, he embarks on an epic quest through the treacherous pinewoods, swamps, and river bottoms of the Southern frontier. . . . Inspired by actual historical events, and at times both violent and beautiful, The Eden Hunter is the amazing story of a man's journey into the turbulent forces of a torn and fragmented land."  (Counterpoint, August 2010)

Comments

Timber Beasts

I've read the book twice and rather hoped to hear the program that the author spoke on the book. But that page was not available on your site. Anyway, I loved the book. I thought it was an exciting dose of history. Stoner brought the Portland of  1900 to life. There was intrigue that kept my interest throughout the book.

Today's Interview

I was washing eggs at the farm when this came on. I loved it and looked for it to share with my peeps!

 

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