Between the Covers

A weekly show featuring interviews with locally and nationally known authors of both fiction and non-fiction.

Coming Soon

Kate Gray, Carry the Sky. Debut novel by Portland-based poet & community college instructor
Bone Clocks by David Mitchell
Citizen: An American Lyric by Claudia Rankine
 

Episode Archive

Between the Covers on 08/01/13

Categories:
Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 08/01/2013 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
George Packer on his book "Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America"

George Packer discusses his latest book, "The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America," a broadbased look at how America has changed in the past thirty-five years. Hosted by Richard Wolinsky of the series Bookwaves.

Between the Covers on 07/25/13

Categories:
Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 07/25/2013 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Actress and author Julia Sweeney talks about her new book If It's Not One Thing, It's Your Mother.

Host Ren Green interviews actress and author Julia Sweeney, better known from Saturday Night Live and her one-woman show God Said "Ha!" Sweeney talks about adoptive motherhood, minivans, and her new book If It's Not One Thing, It's Your Mother, written during a much-needed vacation from the family she worked so hard to assemble.

Between the Covers on 07/18/13

Categories:
Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 07/18/2013 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Mystery writer Craig Johnson on his new book "A Serpent's Tooth"

Host Gene Bradley speaks with Craig Johnson, the New York Times bestselling author of the Walt Longmire mystery series. Johnson’s series is the basis for Longmire, the hit A&E-TV original drama. They discuss Johnson's latest novel in the Longmire series, A SERPENT’S TOOTH. This time Wyoming Sheriff Walt Longmire finds himself in the crosshairs of a brewing religious war.

Between the Covers on 07/11/13

Categories:
Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 07/11/2013 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
In the House Upon the Dirt Between the Lake and the Woods by Matt Bell

Matt Bell's novel is so unlike anything else you'll read this year that people are struggling to describe just what it is.  The Washington Post says it's like a magical realist story chanted by druids on mushrooms, The Stranger says it feels like a Tolkein epic set inside Plato's cave and told by Carl Jung, others mention Calvino, Borges, Kafka, and the Bible.  Earlier this year Flavorwire called Matt Bell one of the 10 best millennial writers you haven't read (yet) and NPR called Bell's book, In the House Upon the Dirt Between the Lake and the Woods, one of the smartest meditations on love, family and marriage in recent years.  David Naimon hosts.

Between the Covers on 07/04/13

Categories:
Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 07/04/2013 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Scott Elliott on his novel Temple Grove

Host Jennifer Kemp interviews Washington State author Scott Elliott about his new novel TEMPLE GROVE, the story of a young man who is part Native American and who falls in love with Olympic National Park and makes a point to protect it, perhaps with disastrous consequences.

Between the Covers on 06/27/13

Categories:
Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 06/27/2013 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
We Need New Names with NoViolet Bulawayo

Darling is only 10 years old, and yet she must navigate a fragile and violent world. In Zimbabwe, Darling and her friends steal guavas, try to get the baby out of young Chipo's belly, and grasp at memories of Before. Before their homes were destroyed by paramilitary policemen, before the school closed, before the fathers left for dangerous jobs abroad. But Darling has a chance to escape: she has an aunt in America. She travels to this new land in search of America's famous abundance only to find that her options as an immigrant are perilously few. NoViolet Bulawayo's debut calls to mind the great storytellers of displacement and arrival who have come before her--from Zadie Smith to Monica Ali to J.M. Coetzee--while she tells a vivid, raw story all her own.

Between the Covers on 06/20/13

Categories:
Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 06/20/2013 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Colum McCann on his new novel "Transatlantic"

Host ren green speaks with Colum McCann, winner of the National Book Award and the bestselling author of "Let the Great World Spin," about his new novel "Transatlantic," which connects a series of narratives spanning 150 years and two continents moving from 1845 to Frederick Douglass to George Mitchell to Obama.          

Beginning in the year of the Irish famine and ending in 2011 when President Obama lands on Irish shores, truth meets the imagination, and fact meets fiction, "Transatlantic" is a meditation on identity and history. 

Between the Covers on 06/13/13

Categories:
Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 06/13/2013 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Khaled Hosseini on his new novel "And the Mountains Echoed"

Host Sarika Mehta interviews Khaled Hosseini about his new book "And the Mountains Echoed," a multigenerational novel that follows its characters around the globe - from Kabul, to Paris, to San Francisco, to the Greek island of Tinos.

Khaled Hosseini was born in Kabul, Afghanistan and moved to the United States with his family in 1980, where he trained as a doctor with a specialty in internal medicine. He is the author of "The Kite Runner" and "A THousand Splendid Suns." He is also a Goodwill Envoy to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the Un Refugee Agency, and the founder of The Khaled Hosseini Foundation, which provides humanitartian assistance to the peopleof Afghanistan.

Between the Covers on 06/06/13

Categories:
Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 06/06/2013 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Writer and professor Marivi Soliven on her novel "The Mango Bride"

Host Sarika Mehta interviews Marivi Soliven about her new novel "The Mango Bride." 

"The Mango Bride" is the story of two immigrant Filipinas in California. Banished by her wealthy Filipino family in Manila, Amparo Guerrero travels to Oakland, California, to forge a new life. Although her mother labels her life in exile a diminished one, Amparo believes her struggles are a small price to pay for freedom…

Like Amparo, Beverly Obejas – an impoverished Filipina waitress – forsakes Manila and comes to Oakland as a mail order bride in search of a better life. Yet even in the land of plenty, Beverly fails to find the happiness and prosperity she envisioned.

Between the Covers on 05/30/13

Categories:
Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 05/30/2013 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Stupid Children with Lenore Zion

Jane lived happily with her father until his failed suicide attempt and relocation to a mental hospital forced her into the foster care system.  By chance, Jane is assigned to foster parents involved in the Second Day Believers—a cult focused on the “cleansing” of mental impurities in their children, and the sanctity of the internal organs of farm animals. Jane is quickly initiated into the cult but her father’s lingering voice prevents her from becoming entirely indoctrinated.  Despite Jane’s resistance, she is revered in the cult as the second coming of the late wife of the leader of the Second Day Believers.

Audio

Peter Mountford discusses recent novel: "A Young Man's Guide to Late Capitalism"

program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Wed, 04/13/2011

Host Marianne Barisonek speaks with fiction writer Peter Mountford about his new novel A Young Man's Guide to Late Capitalism, which tells the story of Gabriel de Boya, a recent college graduate who works for an unscrupulous hedge fund while pretending to be a freelance journalist. Mountford drew on his own experience for the book. Just out of college, he was hired to write about the economy of Ecuador for a nonprofit think tank. He later discovered that the think tank was running a hedge fund out of its back office.

Jess Walters, author of "The Financial Lives of the Poets" describes "A Young Man's GUide to Late Capitalism" as a "parable of the voracious global economy." 

Mystery writer Rhys Bowen discusses "Royal Flush"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Wed, 04/06/2011

Ed Goldberg interviews Rhys Bowen author of Royal Flush, a mystery set in a Scottish castle with Lady Georgiana Rannoch in her third madcap adventure.  Humor and history combine in this novel that also includes a group of demanding Americans, ghosts, haggis, a monster in the Loch, and a sinister someone with a gun.   

Mystery writer Lisa Gardner on her new novel "Love You More"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 03/31/2011

Host Ed Goldberg interviews mystery suspense author Lisa Gardner about her new novel Love You More. In Love You More the crime appears open-and-shut: Pushed to the brink by an abusive husband, state police trooper Tessa Leoni finally snapped and shot him in self-defense. But Tessa isn’t talking–not about her dead husband, her battered face, or her missing six-year old daughter. Now, Detective D.D. Warren will have to race against the clock to unearth family secrets, solve a murder and save a child.

Patty Somlo on her book "From Here to There and Other Stories"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 03/24/2011

Host Marianne Barisonek speaks with Portlander and former journalist Patty Somlo about her newest book, From Here to There And Other Stories. Patty Somlo is a short story writer who makes occasional forays into non-fiction. Her work has been published in numerous print and online publications, including the San Francisco Chronicle, San Francisco Examiner, Baltimore Sun, Seattle Post-Intelligencer, The Oregonian, Santa Clara Review, Fringe Magazine, Guernica, Common Boundary: Stories of Immigration (Editions Bibliotekos), and the Los Angeles Review. Patty has served as an associate editor for Pacific News Service in San Francisco and as a member of the editorial collective for VoiceCatcher, an annual anthology featuring the writings of women from Portland, Oregon. She holds an M.A. in English with a concentration in Creative Writing from San Francisco State University.

  • Length: 26:40 minutes (24.41 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Gemma Whelan talks about her novel "Fiona: Stolen Child"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 03/17/2011

  In the novel Fiona Clarke, an Irish writer living in New York, has been running away from her past since she left rural Cregora, Ireland, for boarding school. That past finds her, many years later, when her thinly veiled autobiographical novel is optioned for a movie. Working as the film’s consultant, Fiona unearths deep secrets, relives childhood trauma, and connects with an estranged family thrust back into her life. As her history opens upon her, Fiona must stop running and confront her secret shame: her long-held sense of responsibility over the death of her little sister.

Host Marianne Barisonek interviews author Gemma Whelan, an Irish-born theatre director and educator. After moving to the San Francisco Bay Area, Whelan directed more than sixty stage productions and was founding artistic director of GemArt and Wilde Irish Productions. Gemma is also an award-winning screenwriter and film director. She graduated from Trinity College, Dublin in English and French, and has graduate degrees from University of California, Berkeley in Theatre and San Francisco State University in Cinema. Gemma lives in Portland.

Cynthia Grant Tucker author of "No Silent Witness" on women who influenced liberal culture in PDX, U.S.

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 03/10/2011

Guest Cynthia Grant Tucker, author of No Silent Witness: the Eliot Parsonage Women and their Unitarian World,  discusses the stories of the women who influenced the liberal culture of America, particularly here in Portland.

"No Silent Witness" is a group biography which follows three generations of ministers' daughters and wives in a famed American Unitarian family. Spanning 150 years from the early 19th century forward, the narrative divides into six chapters. Each chapter takes up a different woman's defining experience, from the deaths of numerous children and the anguish of infertility to the suffocation of small parish life with its chronic loneliness, doubt, and resentment. All of the stories are linked by the women's continuing battles to make themselves heard over clerical wisdom that contradicts their reality.

Cynthia Grant Tucker also spoke in Portland on "The Remarkable Eliot Women" on Friday, March 11th from 7-8:30PM at the First Unitarian Church at 1101 SW 12th Avenue in Portland. 

 

Author Jennifer Lauck on "Found: A Memoir"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 03/03/2011

The guest is Portland journalist and author Jennifer Lauck. She is the author of the previous memoirs Blackbird and Still Waters. She worked for eight years in television news before becoming a memoir writer, speaker and teacher.

Jennifer Lauck's fourth and final memoir is titled Found: A Memoir  & True Sequel to Blackbird which is about the search and reunion with her birth mother. Her writing explores the complexity of human existence as well as the depths of loss. By ten, she was homeless in Los Angeles, after the deaths of her adoptive mother and father. Raised by extended family, she also suffered the loss of her adoptive brother who took his life when she was 20 years old. Lauck writes and speaks about perseverance, courage and the remarkable capacity of humans to transcend the worst of losses with grace  

 

Tom Rachman on "The Imperfectionists" -- novel of a Roman newspaper and its staff

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 02/24/2011

Ed Goldberg interviews Tom Rachman, author of The Imperfectionists, a novel about a newspaper in Rome and the characters that staff it.

Tom Rachman was born in 1974 in London, but grew up in Vancouver. He studied cinema at the University of Toronto and completed a Master's degree in journalism at Columbia University in New York. From 1998, he worked as an editor at the foreign desk of The Associated Press in New York, then did a stint as a reporter in India and Sri Lanka, before returning to New York. In 2002, he was sent to Rome as an AP correspondent, with assignments taking him to Japan, South Korea, Turkey and Egypt. Beginning in 2006, he worked part-time as an editor at the International Herald Tribune in Paris to support himself while writing fiction. He now lives in London, where he is working on his second novel. 

Novelist Mary Roninette Kowal on her regency fantasy: "Shades of Milk and Honey"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Fri, 02/11/2011

Host Marianne Barisonek speaks with Mary Robinette Kowal the author of Shades of Milk and Honey, an intimate portrait of Jane Ellsworth, a woman ahead of her time in a version of Regency England where the manipulation of glamour is considered an essential skill for a lady of quality. 

In 2008 Mary Robinette Kowal received the Campbell Award for Best New Writer.  She was a 2009 Hugo nominee for her story “Evil Robot Monkey.” Her stories have appeared in Strange Horizons, Asimov’s, and several Year’s Best anthologies as well as her short story collection Scenting the Dark and Other Stories from Subterranean Press.

Mary, a professional puppeteer and voice actor, has performed for LazyTown (CBS), the Center for Puppetry Arts, Jim Henson Pictures and founded N. Her designs have garnered two UNIMA-USA Citations of Excellence, the highest award an American puppeteer can achieve. She also records fiction for authors such as Kage Baker, Cory Doctorow and John Scalzi.

She is the Vice President of Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. Mary lives in Portland, OR with her husband Rob and over a dozen manual typewriters.

 

Writer Alice Hoffman on "The Red Garden," linked stories of rural Massachussets

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 02/03/2011

Distinguished writer Alice Hoffman talks about her new book, The Red Garden, a collection of linked fictions about a small town in Massachusetts where a garden holds the secrets of many lives.
Alice Hoffman  has published a total of eighteen novels, two books of short fiction, and eight books for children and young adults.
 

  • Length: 17:07 minutes (7.83 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 64Kbps (CBR)

Comments

Timber Beasts

I've read the book twice and rather hoped to hear the program that the author spoke on the book. But that page was not available on your site. Anyway, I loved the book. I thought it was an exciting dose of history. Stoner brought the Portland of  1900 to life. There was intrigue that kept my interest throughout the book.

Today's Interview

I was washing eggs at the farm when this came on. I loved it and looked for it to share with my peeps!

 

Copyright © 2012 KBOO Community Radio | Community Guidelines | Website Illustration & Design by: KMF ILLUSTRATION