Between the Covers

A weekly show featuring interviews with locally and nationally known authors of both fiction and non-fiction.

Episode Archive

Rabih Alameddine on his new novel "An Unnecessary Woman"

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 02/06/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Rabih Alameddine on his new novel "An Unnecessary Woman"

Host Kathleen Stephenson interviews Rabih Alameddine, one of the Middle East's most celebrated voices, about his new novel  "An Unnecessary Woman."

Rabih Alameddine follows his bestseller, The Hakawati, with "An Unnecessary Woman," a novel that explores the singular life of an obsessive introvert, revealing Beirut’s beauties and horrors along the way.

Doug Erickson, Lewis and Clark College Archivist, on the William Stafford Centennial

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 01/30/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Doug Erickson, Lewis and Clark College Archivist, on the William Stafford Centennial

Host Kathleen Stephenson speaks with Doug Erickson, Lewis & Clark College Head of Special Collections and College Archivist and Director of Oregon Poetic Voices, about the life and work of the late Oregon poet William Stafford. 2014 is the Centennial of Stafford's birth, and there are events in Oregon and around the world to mark the Centennial.

http://williamstaffordarchives.org/

I Am Not a Poet, a new book of poetry published by Street Roots

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 01/23/2014 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
I Am Not a Poet, a new book of poetry published by Street Roots

In this Part 2 of Between the Covers we interview a group of people involved in "I Am Not a Poet," a new book of poetry being published by Street Roots, Portland's flagship publication addressing homelessness and poverty since 1998. The guests are Cole Merkel, SR Vendor Coordinator and leadier of the weekly Street Roots creative writing workshop; Vinnie Kinsella who is currently a volunteer copywriter for Street Roots; and contributing poet and homeless advocate Leo Rhodes.

Little Failure: A Memoir by Gary Shteyngart

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 01/23/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Little Failure: A Memoir by Gary Shteyngart


“A memoir for the ages . . . I spat laughter on the first page and closed the last with wet eyes. Unputdownable in the day and a half I spent reading it, Little Failure is a window into immigrant agony and ambition, Jewish angst, and anybody’s desperate need for a tribe.”—Mary Karr, bestselling author of Lit and The Liars’ Club

Mitchell S. Jackson on his Autobiographical Novel "The Residue Years"

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 01/16/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Mitchell S. Jackson speaks with host Jennifer Kemp about his novel "The Residue Years"

Host Jennifer Kemp speaks with Mitchell S. Jackson about his novel The Residue Years.  In this autobiographical novel, Mitchell writes what it was to come of age in Portland in the ’90s under the shadow of crack cocaine and its familiar mayhem.

Interview with Mona Golabek, author of "The Children of Willesden Lane"

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 01/09/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Interview with Mona Golabek, author of "The Children of Willesden Lane"

Mona Golabek, author of "The Children of Willesden Lane," an account of her mother's ordeal during World War II, is also a concert pianist and performer. She discusses her book, and the play created from her book, "The Pianist of Willesden Lane" with host Richard Wolinsky. 

From the series Bookwaves. An extended version can be found at www.bookwaves.com 

Dan Johnson on his book "The Air In Me," a collection of prose and poetry

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 01/02/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Dan Johnson talks about his life and reads from his book, The Air In Me

Host Kathleen Stephenson speaks with Dan Johnson, writer and KBOO volunteer, about his new book, The Air In Me, a collection of prose and poetry reflecting on Dan's life as an aging gay man.

Edwidge Danticat on her new novel "Claire of the Sea Light

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 12/26/2013 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Edwidge Danticat on her new novel "Claire of the Sea Light

From the series Bookwaves Haitian-American author Edwidge Danticat discusses her new novel, "Claire of the Sea Light," and her career with host Richard Wolinsky. 

Edwidge Danticat was born in Haiti in 1969 and came to the United States when she was twelve years old. She graduated from Barnard College and received an M.F.A. from Brown University. She made an auspicious debut with her first novel, Breath, Eyes, Memory, and followed it with the story collection Krik? Krak!, whose National Book Award nomination made Danticat the youngest nominee ever. She lives in New York.

Image: Photo by David Shankbone.

The Sad Passions by Veronica Gonzalez Peña

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 12/19/2013 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
The Sad Passions by Veronica Gonzalez Peña


Told by six women in one family, Veronica Gonzalez Peña’s The Sad Passions captures the alertness, beauty, and terror of childhood lived in proximity to madness. Set against the backdrop of a colonial past, spanning three generations, and shuttling from Mexico City to Oaxaca to the North Fork of Long Island to Veracruz, The Sad Passions is the lyrical story of a middle-class Mexican family torn apart by the undiagnosed mental illness of Claudia, a lost child of the 1960s and the mother of four little girls.

Joann and Arielle Eckstut on their book, The Secret Language of Color

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 12/12/2013 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Joann and Arielle Eckstut on their book, The Secret Language of Color

Color experts Joann Eckstut and Arielle Eckstut talk about their new book, The Secret Language of Color: Science, Nature, History, Culture, Beauty of Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, and Violet with host Kathleen Stephenson.

Audio

Daniel Orozco

program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 06/23/2011

Short story writer Daniel Orozco reads from his new collection "Orientation". He also talks about how he writes -- creating characters, wrting from one's own experience vs. from someone else's perspective, and other tricks of the trade. And he addresses the status of the short story in contemporary publishing, as well as his day job as a teacher of creative writing.

  • Length: 27:50 minutes (25.48 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Portland writer Trevor Richardson about his novel "American Bastards"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 06/16/2011

In part two of today's Between the Covers host Ed Goldberg speaks with Portland writer Trevor Richardson about his debut novel "American Bastards," a surreal novel of self-discovery and hipster culture. In this novel a number of dead rock stars try to save the world, a hitchhiking Uncle Sam heads to Hollywood, New York City is invaded by the restless dead, and more. We are the bastard children of the American Dream.

http://www.seahorserodeofolkrevival.com/Trevor-Richardson.html

  • Length: 28:17 minutes (38.85 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 192Kbps (CBR)

Interview with Paul Collins author of Crime of the Century

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 06/16/2011

Dan Johnson interviews Portland writer and teacher Paul Collins about his most recent book "The Crime of The Century" A story literally ripped from the headlines about one of grizzliest murders in American history. In addition, we are introduced to Yellow Journalism from two of America's larger than life newspaper tycoons.

  • Length: 28:41 minutes (26.27 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Daniel Wilson talks about his novel "Robopocalypse"

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 06/09/2011

Host Marianne Barisonek interviews Portland writer, television host and robotics engineer Daniel Wilson, author of the technothriller "Robopocalypse," which explores the fate of the human race following a robot uprising.

Wilson has an M.S. and P.H.D. in Robotics, and an M.S. in Machine Learning. His other books include the 2005 book "How to Survive a Robot Uprising: Tips on Defending Yourself Against the Coming Rebellion," "Where's My Jetpack?: A Guide to the Amazing Science Fiction Future That Never Arrived," "How To Build a Robot Army: Tips on Defending Planet Earth Against Aliens, Ninjas, and Zombies," and "The Mad Scientist Hall of Fame: Muwahahaha!"

  • Length: 26:23 minutes (36.23 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 192Kbps (CBR)

Between the Covers on 06/02/11, Steve Earle interviewed by Robyn Shanti

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 06/02/2011

Host Robyn Shanti interviews Steve Earle, musician, actor, and writer about his first novel, I'll Never Get Out of This World Alive, named after a Hank Williams song.. The novel is set in San Antonio in 1963, and tells the story of a defrocked doctor and morphine addict. The doctor makes a living by performing illegal abortions and is haunted by the ghost of Hank Williams, with whom he was traveling when Williams died of an overdose.

A Jane Austen Education, by Bill Deresiewicz

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 05/26/2011

The guest is Portland writer Bill Deresiewicz, author of A JANE AUSTEN EDUCATION: How Six Novels Taught Me about Love, Friendship, and the Things that Really Matter.

When Bill Deresiewicz was forced to read Jane Austen in graduate school, he discovered that Austen was perhaps the one writer who could teach him how to be a better person. We'll hear why.

William Deresiewicz was an associate professor of English at Yale University until 2008 and is a widely published literary critic who writes for a popular audience. His reviews and criticism regularly appear in The New Republic, The Nation, The American Scholar, the London Review of Books, and The New York Times. In 2008 he was nominated for a National Magazine Award for reviews and criticism.

  • Length: 27:15 minutes (12.47 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 64Kbps (CBR)

Geraldine Brooks talks about "Caleb's Crossing," her novel inspired by Harvard's first Native American graduate

program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 05/19/2011

Host Marianne Barisonek interviews Geraldine Brooks, best-selling author and winner of the Pulitzer Prize (for March) about her new book, CALEB’S CROSSING, which was inspired by the life of Caleb Cheeshahteaumauk, the first Native American to graduate from Harvard College. Brooks first learned about him during her time as a Radcliffe fellow at Harvard in 2006. Caleb was from the Wampanoag tribe of Native Americans who lived on Martha’s Vineyard. There is little official information on Caleb’s life and Brooks’s novel is an informed imagining of what he might have gone through. 

Ann Crittenden on "The Price of Motherhood: Why the Most Important Job in the World Is Still the Least Valued"

program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 05/05/2011

Ann Crittenden talks about the 10th anniversary of her bestselling book The Price of Motherhood: Why the Most Important Job in the World Is Still the Least Valued. Ann shows how mothers are systematically disadvantaged and made dependent by a society that exploits those who perform its most critical work. Although women have been liberated, mothers have not.

Ann's Portland Event: What is the Price of Motherhood?

A benefit for Family Forward Oregon
Thursday, May 5th, 7-8:30PM
First Unitarian Church, 1011 SW 12th Ave., Portland 

 

Wayne Pacelle on "The Bond: Our Kinship with Animals, Our Call to Defend them"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 04/28/2011

The guest is Wayne Pacelle, President of the Humane Society of the United States, and author of the new book, The Bond: Our Kinship with Animals, Our Call to Defend Them. Pacelle will discuss the deep links of the human-animal bond as wll as the conflicting implulses that have led us to betray this bond through widespread and systemic cruelty to animals.

Wayne Pacelle has been with the Humane Society of the U.S. for seventeen years. He has taken a special interest in law reform and has been a leading strategist in getting animal protection laws enacted by the direct action of the electorate.

Between the Covers 04-21-11 Author/Publisher Tod Davies

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 04/21/2011

Host Lyn Moelich spoke with Tod Davies, author of Snotty Saves the Day:  The History of Arcadia. In this fantasy from Exterminating Angel Press, a manuscript, delivered by Owl, is left under an old fir tree in the snow, and another world's scientists have discovered that the laws of the universe are found in fairy tales.

Tod Davies will read from "Snotty Saves the Day" on Sunday May 1st, 4pm at Powell's Books on Hawthorne

Comments

Timber Beasts

I've read the book twice and rather hoped to hear the program that the author spoke on the book. But that page was not available on your site. Anyway, I loved the book. I thought it was an exciting dose of history. Stoner brought the Portland of  1900 to life. There was intrigue that kept my interest throughout the book.

Today's Interview

I was washing eggs at the farm when this came on. I loved it and looked for it to share with my peeps!

 

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