Between the Covers

A weekly show featuring interviews with locally and nationally known authors of both fiction and non-fiction.

Coming Soon

The Argonauts by Maggie Nelson
Music for Wartime by Rebecca Makkai
A Long High Whistle by David Biespiel
 

Episode Archive

Megan Kruse: Call Me Home

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 03/12/2015 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Megan Kruse: Call Me Home. Debut novel published by Portland-based Hawthorne Books

Between the Covers welcomes Pacific Northwest writer, Megan Kruse.  Her debut novel, Call Me Home, delineates what occurs within a nuclear family with an abusive father.  How domestic violence can draw a brother and sister closer than twins, compell a daughter to make a glass sandwich for her dad, cause a son to betray his mom for his father's approval, and a mother blame herself for it all.  The freedom and isolation of the American West is dangerous country for abused women, gay sons and emerging daughters.  Violence looms like clouds.  They keep their secrets and wait, for what feels like a lifetime, for their one chance to be free.
 

Get in Trouble with Kelly Link

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 03/05/2015 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Get in Trouble with Kelly Link

She has been hailed by Michael Chabon as “the most darkly playful voice in American fiction” and by Neil Gaiman as “a national treasure.” Now Kelly Link’s eagerly awaited new collection—her first for adult readers in a decade—proves indelibly that this bewitchingly original writer is among the finest we have.  Hurricanes, astronauts, evil twins, bootleggers, Ouija boards, iguanas, The Wizard of Oz, superheroes, the Pyramids . . . These are just some of the talismans of an imagination as capacious and as full of wonder as that of any writer today.

Binary Star by Sarah Gerard

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 02/26/2015 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Binary Star by Sarah Gerard
The language of the stars is the language of the body. Like a star, the anorexic burns fuel that isn't replenished; she is held together by her own gravity.  With luminous, lyrical prose, Binary Star is an account of a young woman struggling with anorexia and her long-distance, alcoholic boyfriend.

How Not to Avoid Jet Lag & other tales of travel madness

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 02/19/2015 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
How Not to Avoid Jet Lag & other tales of travel madness
Host Ken Jones talks with travel writer Joshua Samuel Brown, author of the new book How Not to Avoid Jet Lag & other tales of travel madness. Joshua spent the better part of the first decade of the 21st century roaming around East Asia and writing for a variety of publications, before writing his first book of short stories Vignettes of Taiwan. This book helped land him steady work with Lonely Planet, on whose behalf he journeyed for several years through Asia and Central American before, according to Joshua, going slightly mad and deciding to settle down in Portland, Oregon. Joshua is a two-time recipient of the Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism fellowship at the University of Southern California.

Sarah Van Gelder on "Sustainable Happiness: Live Simply, Live Well, Make a Difference"

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 02/05/2015 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Sarah Van Gelder on "Sustainable Happiness: Live Simply, Live Well, Make a Difference"

We speak with Sarah Sarah van Gelder, about "Sustainable Happiness: Live Simply, Live Well, Make a Difference," which she edited along with the staff or Yes! Magazine.

With contributions by writers like Annie Leonard, Matthieu Ricard, and Vandana Shiva, SUSTAINABLE HAPPINESS features some of the most insightful and eloquent thinkers we’ve worked with on the meaning, and pursuit, of happiness. What is true happiness if it doesn’t include the happiness of others and the health of a living planet?

The First Bad Man by Miranda July

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 01/29/2015 - 11:00am - 11:45am
Short Description: 
The First Bad Man by Miranda July

“Miranda July's ability to pervert norms while embracing what makes us normal is astounding. Writing in the first person with the frank, odd lilt of an utterly truthful character, she will make you laugh, cringe and recognize yourself in a woman you never planned to be. By the time July tackles motherhood, the book has become a bible. Never has a novel spoken so deeply to my sexuality, my spirituality, my secret self. I know I am not alone.” (Lena Dunham, author of Not That Kind of Girl)

The Rev. Dr. Marilyn Sewell on her memoir, "Raw Faith: Following the Thread"

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 01/22/2015 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
The Rev. Dr. Marilyn Sewell on her memoir, "Raw Faith: Following the Thread"

Today's guest is the Rev. Dr. Marilyn Sewell, an accomplished Unitarian Universalist minister, and a respected writer, leader, activist, and speaker. She'll discuss her new memoir, "Raw Faith: Following the Thread."

In "Raw Faith: Following the Thread" Marilyn writes about a universal longing — the longing for love and acceptance, the longing for home. 

Marilyn Sewell is also an Adjunct Fellow at the Attic Institute, a literary think tank and visual arts studio in Portland, Oregon that is a haven for writers and artists.  
She is the subject of the award-winning film Raw Faith and contributes regularly to The Huffington Post. She has authored and edited nine books and hosted an online radio show.

Azar Nafisi on "The Republic of Imagination: America in Three Books"

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 01/15/2015 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Azar Nafisi on "The Republic of Imagination: America in Three Books"
Bookwaves host Richard Wolinsky speaks with Azar Nafisi, author of "Reading Lolita in Tehran" about her latest book, "The Republic of Imagination: America in Three Books." Blending memoir and polemic with close readings of her favorite American novels—"The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn", "Babbitt", and "The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter", among others—she invites us to join her as citizens of her “Republic of Imagination,” a country where the villains are conformity and orthodoxy and the only passport to entry is a free mind and a willingness to dream.

Steven Pinker on his latest book, "The Sense of Style"

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 01/08/2015 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Steven Pinker on his latest book, "The Sense of Style"
Cognitive scientist Steven Pinker discusses his latest book, "The Sense of Style," a style manual for the 21st Century, along with his other books, including "The Better Angels of Our Nature." Hosted by Richard Wolinsky. 

From the series Bookwaves.
An extended 45-minute version of this interview can be found at www.bookwaves.com 

photo credit: Max Gerber

The Empathy Exams by Leslie Jamison

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 12/18/2014 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
The Empathy Exams by Leslie Jamison
The Empathy Exams by Leslie Jamison

Audio

PDX author Ann Littlewood on her 2nd 'zoo-dunnit:' "Did Not Survive"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 08/05/2010

Host Ed Goldberg speaks with Portland author Ann Littlewood about her second "zoo-dunnit", "Did Not Survive," published by Poisoned Pen Press. The mystery continues where "Night Kill" left off. Now-pregnant zoo keeper Iris Oakley finds her boss gravely injured in an elephant stall. She suspects something more sinister than a rogue elephant. Animal rights activists are picketing the zoo, animals are disappearing, and staff are acting strangely. Then it gets worse.
The passionate issues around captive elephant management are woven throughout this traditional mystery set in fictional Finley Memorial Zoo in Vancouver, Washington. 

Ann Littlewood readings:
August 6 Friday 5-9 PM and August 7 Saturday 10 AM to 2 PM Art in the Heart, Vancouver, WA.
August 21 Saturday Northwest Author Fair, Lincoln City, OR, noon to 3 PM.

Caroline Miller on "Heart Land" and Gothic Spring"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 07/29/2010

Host Ed Goldberg speaks with Portland writer Caroline Miller, author of "Heart Land," stories of Depression-Era Ohio and "Gothic Spring," a novel of passion and bad behavior in rural 19th Century England.

Caroline Miller has published numerous short stories in publications as diverse as Children’s Digest, Grit and Tales of the Talisman. Her short story, “Under the Bridge and Beneath the Moon,’ was dramatized for radio in Oregon and Washington. Her novel, Heart Land was published in 2009 by Schiel & Denver, and Gothic Spring was also published in 2009 by Asylett press.

Caroline is also a silk painter whose pieces have been sold in local galleries in the Portland area. Her art work has also been included in a number of juried exhibits. She taught English at both the high school and university levels, headed a Labor union for five years and successfully ran for public office three times. She holds a B.A. and M.A.T. degree from Reed College and an M.A. in Literature from Northern Arizona University where she graduated with honors. Ms. Miller lived for two years in England and two years in what is now called Zimbabwe.

  • Length: 26:56 minutes (24.66 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Thomas Chatterton Williams on "LOSING MY COOL: How a Father's Love and 15,000 Books Beat Hip-Hop Culture "

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 07/15/2010
Host Cecil Prescod speaks with Thomas Chatterton Williams about his memoir, LOSING MY COOL: How a Father's Love and 15,000 Books Beat Hip-Hop Culture. In the book Williams describes how he managed to juggle two disparate lifestyles--"keeping it real" in his friends' eyes and studying for the SATs under his father's strict tutelage. Pappy grew up in the segregated South and hid in closets so he could read Aesop and Plato. He envisioned for his son a lot in life greater than his own, and encouraged Williams to read and educate himself, and to embrace the opportunities that had not been available to Pappy's generation. As college approached and the stakes of the thug lifestyle escalated, the disparity between Williams' street life and home life threatened to undo him. Ultimately, Williams would have to decide between hip-hop and his future.
Thomas Chatterton Williams holds a Bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Georgetown University and a Master’s degree from the Cultural Reporting and Criticism program at New York University. In 2007, he wrote an op-ed piece entitled “Yes, Blame Hip-Hop” for the Washington Post which generated a record-breaking number of comments. He writes for the literary magazine n+1 and currently lives in Brooklyn.
 

Novelist Lauie Notaro on her "Spooky Little Girl"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 07/08/2010

 

Host Ed Goldberg interviews Lauie Notaro, author of Spooky Little Girl, a funny novel about a woman whose life changes after she is killed by a bus.

Laurie Notaro was born in Brooklyn, New York, and raised in Phoenix, Arizona. She packed her bags for Eugene, Oregon, once she realized that since she was past thirty, her mother could no longer report her as a teenage runaway. She is the author of The Idiot Girls’ Action-Adventure Club, Autobiography of a Fat Bride, I Love Everybody, We Thought You’d Be Prettier, and An Idiot Girl’s Christmas.

Diane Hammond on "Seeing Stars," her novel on child actors in Hollywood

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 07/01/2010

 Host Ed Goldberg interviews Pacific Northwest writer Diane Hammond, author of Going to Bend, Homesick Creek, and Hannah's Dream. She talks about her latest book Seeing Stars, a novel about child actors in Hollywood with talent managers, agents, coaches, directors and teachers who nurture—and feed on—their ambitions.    

http://www.dianehammond.com/stars_chapter1.html 

The Battle for Gotham: New York in the Shadow of Robert Moses and Jane Jacobs

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 06/24/2010

Host Bruce Silverman speaks with Roberta Gratz, author of "The Battle for Gotham: New York in the Shadow of Robert Moses and Jane Jacobs." Urban critic and journalist Roberta Brandes Gratz argues that New York City regenerated itself because of the waning power of Robert Moses. His decline in the late 1960s and the drying up of big government funding for urban renewal projects allowed New York to organically regenerate according to the precepts defined by Jane Jacobs in her classic, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, and in contradiction to Moses's urban philosophy.

  • Length: 28:26 minutes (26.04 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Biographer Jimmy McDonough on "Tammy Wynette: Tragic Country Queen"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 06/17/2010

  Host Ed Goldberg speaks with Jimmy McDonough, author of Tammy Wynette: Tragic Country Queen, a biography of the country music diva.

Jimmy McDonough’s biography of Neil Young, Shakey, was a critically acclaimed New York Times bestseller. He has also written biographies of Russ Meyer and Andy Milligan, and has written for publications including The Village Voice and Variety. He lives in Portland.

 

 Glen David Gold on his new novel "Sunnyside"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 05/27/2010
Host Ed Goldberg interviews Glen David Gold, author of Sunnyside, a historical novel set during World War I. It features Charlie Chaplin and Rin Tin Tin.   Glen David Gold is the author of the best seller Carter Beats the Devil

Novelist Katie Arnoldi on "Point Dume," a tale of pot farms, surf culture and risk

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 05/20/2010
Katie Arnoldi, bestselling author of Chemical Pink and The Wentworths, talks about her latest novel, POINT DUME, a timely tale of pot farms, surf culture and risk.  Hosted by Lisa Loving.

Author Bill Morgan on "The Typewriter is Holy: The Complete Uncensored History of the Beat Generation"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 05/13/2010

Kathleen Stephenson speaks with guest Bill Morgan, author of The Typewriter is Holy: The Complete Uncensored History of the Beat Generation, which explores the enduring revolutionary appeal of Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, and WilliamS. Burroughs and brings to light lesser known Beat artists like Alan Ansen and Joanne Kyger. Morgan is the author and editor of more than a dozen books about the Beat writers. 

Comments

Timber Beasts

I've read the book twice and rather hoped to hear the program that the author spoke on the book. But that page was not available on your site. Anyway, I loved the book. I thought it was an exciting dose of history. Stoner brought the Portland of  1900 to life. There was intrigue that kept my interest throughout the book.

Today's Interview

I was washing eggs at the farm when this came on. I loved it and looked for it to share with my peeps!

 

Copyright © 2012 KBOO Community Radio | Copyright Policy | Community Guidelines | Website Illustration & Design by: KMF ILLUSTRATION