Between the Covers

A weekly show featuring interviews with locally and nationally known authors of both fiction and non-fiction.

Episode Archive

Information Doesn't Want to Be Free: Cory Doctorow on Art, Copyright, and the Internet

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 11/20/2014 - 11:00am - 11:45am
Short Description: 
Information Doesn't Want to Be Free: Cory Doctorow on Art, Copyright, and the Internet

Host Ken Jones talks with Cory Doctorow, science fiction author, activist, journalist and blogger -- the co-editor of Boing Boing (boingboing.net) and the author of the recently published YA graphic novel In Real Life and the nonfiction book Information Doesn't Want to Be Free: Laws for the Internet Age. He has also published the young adult novels Homeland, Pirate Cinema, and Little Brother, and the novels for adults Rapture of the Nerds and Makers.

Citizen: An American Lyric by Claudia Rankine

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 11/13/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Citizen: An American Lyric by Claudia Rankine

Claudia Rankine, chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, speaks about her much awaited follow-up to her groundbreaking work Don't Let Me Be Lonely.   A provocative meditation on race, Citizen: An American Lyric recounts mounting racial aggressions in ongoing encounters in twenty-first-century daily life and in the media. Some of these encounters are slights, seeming slips of the tongue, and some are intentional offensives in the classroom, at the supermarket, at home, on the tennis court with Serena Williams and the soccer field with Zinedine Zidane, online, on TV—everywhere, all the time. The accumulative stresses come to bear on a person’s ability to speak, perform, and stay alive.

The Peripheral by William Gibson

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 11/06/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
The Peripheral by William Gibson

Where Flynne and her brother, Burton, live, jobs outside the drug business are rare. Fortunately, Burton has his veteran’s benefits, for neural damage he suffered from implants during his time in the USMC’s elite Haptic Recon force. Then one night Burton has to go out, but there’s a job he’s supposed to do—a job Flynne didn’t know he had. Beta-testing part of a new game, he tells her. The job seems to be simple: work a perimeter around the image of a tower building. Little buglike things turn up. He’s supposed to get in their way, edge them back. That’s all there is to it. He’s offering Flynne a good price to take over for him. What she sees, though, isn’t what Burton told her to expect.

Roberto Trotta, The Edge of the Sky: All You Need to Know About the All There Is (Book Giveaway!)

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 10/30/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Roberto Trotta, The Edge of the Sky

Roberto Trotta, a theoretical cosmologist and lecturer in astrophysics at Imperial College, London, is the author of the new book, "The Edge of the Sky: All You Need to Know About the All There Is".   KBOO will give away a copy of the book during this broadcast!

Roberta Trotta deconstructs the Universe, using only the 1000 most common words in the English Language, in 85 pages.  The result is not only illuminating, but pure poetry.  Planets become crazy stars, galaxies are star crowds, The Milky Way is the white road, and Earth is the home world.

Richard Powers on his novel "Orfeo"

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 10/23/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Richard Powers on his novel "Orfeo"
National Book Award winner Richard Powers discusses his latest novel, "Orfeo," now out in trade paper, about modern music and the horrors of the national security state with host Richard Wolinskyl  

This program is from Bookwaves. An extended version of this interview can be found at www.bookwaves.com 

Alix Christie on her novel "Gutenberg's Apprentice"

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 10/16/2014 - 11:00am - 11:35am
Short Description: 
Alix Christie on her novel "Gutenberg's Apprentice"
Host Kathleen Stephenson speaks with journalist and author Alix Christie about her new novel GUTENBERG’S APPRENTICE. 
Alix tells the story of Gutenberg, his apprentice, and his team of typesetters as they worked on the first mass produced book, the Gutenberg Bible

Alix Christie is a journalist who when she very young was an apprentice at her family’s hot type foundry which still survives in San Francisco.  She owns and operates a 1910 Chandler and Price letterpress. She lives in London, where she reviews books and arts for the Economist. GUTENBERG'S APPRENTICE is her first novel.

Peyton Marshall on her new novel "Goodhouse"

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 10/09/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Peyton Marshall on her new novel "Goodhouse"
We speak wiht Portland author Peyton Marshall about her debut novel GOODHOUSE. Marshall is a former member of an all-female punk band in the 90s.

Bone Clocks by David Mitchell

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 10/02/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Bone Clocks by David Mitchell

Bone Clocks is the much anticipated, dazzling new novel from David Mitchell, the author of Cloud Atlas.  At once a metaphysical thriller, a meditation on mortality and a chronicle of our self-devouring times, this kaleidoscopic novel crackles with the invention and wit that have made David Mitchell one of the most celebrated writers of his generation. Here is fiction at its most spellbinding and memorable best.  Bone Clocks is a nominee for the 2014 Man Booker prize.

Kate Gray, Carry the Sky

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 09/25/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Kate Gray, Carry the Sky. Debut novel by Portland-based poet & community college instructor

Between the Covers welcomes Portland-based poet Kate Gray to discuss her debut novel, Carry the Sky, published by local Forest Avenue Press.

Richard Flanagan on his latest novel "The Narrow Road to the Deep North"

Program: 
Between the Covers
Air date: 
Thu, 09/18/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Richard Flanagan on his latest novel "The Narrow Road to the Deep North"
Tasmanian writer Richard Flanagan discusses his latest novel, "The Narrow Road to the Deep North," short listed for the Mann Booker Prize, as well as his career, with host Richard Wolinsky.
"The Narrow Road to the Deep North" is set in 1943 in the despair of a Japanese POW camp on the Thai-Burma Death Railway, 

From the series "Bookwaves"

Audio

PDX author Ann Littlewood on her 2nd 'zoo-dunnit:' "Did Not Survive"

Categories:
program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 08/05/2010

Host Ed Goldberg speaks with Portland author Ann Littlewood about her second "zoo-dunnit", "Did Not Survive," published by Poisoned Pen Press. The mystery continues where "Night Kill" left off. Now-pregnant zoo keeper Iris Oakley finds her boss gravely injured in an elephant stall. She suspects something more sinister than a rogue elephant. Animal rights activists are picketing the zoo, animals are disappearing, and staff are acting strangely. Then it gets worse.
The passionate issues around captive elephant management are woven throughout this traditional mystery set in fictional Finley Memorial Zoo in Vancouver, Washington. 

Ann Littlewood readings:
August 6 Friday 5-9 PM and August 7 Saturday 10 AM to 2 PM Art in the Heart, Vancouver, WA.
August 21 Saturday Northwest Author Fair, Lincoln City, OR, noon to 3 PM.

Caroline Miller on "Heart Land" and Gothic Spring"

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 07/29/2010

Host Ed Goldberg speaks with Portland writer Caroline Miller, author of "Heart Land," stories of Depression-Era Ohio and "Gothic Spring," a novel of passion and bad behavior in rural 19th Century England.

Caroline Miller has published numerous short stories in publications as diverse as Children’s Digest, Grit and Tales of the Talisman. Her short story, “Under the Bridge and Beneath the Moon,’ was dramatized for radio in Oregon and Washington. Her novel, Heart Land was published in 2009 by Schiel & Denver, and Gothic Spring was also published in 2009 by Asylett press.

Caroline is also a silk painter whose pieces have been sold in local galleries in the Portland area. Her art work has also been included in a number of juried exhibits. She taught English at both the high school and university levels, headed a Labor union for five years and successfully ran for public office three times. She holds a B.A. and M.A.T. degree from Reed College and an M.A. in Literature from Northern Arizona University where she graduated with honors. Ms. Miller lived for two years in England and two years in what is now called Zimbabwe.

  • Length: 26:56 minutes (24.66 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Thomas Chatterton Williams on "LOSING MY COOL: How a Father's Love and 15,000 Books Beat Hip-Hop Culture "

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 07/15/2010
Host Cecil Prescod speaks with Thomas Chatterton Williams about his memoir, LOSING MY COOL: How a Father's Love and 15,000 Books Beat Hip-Hop Culture. In the book Williams describes how he managed to juggle two disparate lifestyles--"keeping it real" in his friends' eyes and studying for the SATs under his father's strict tutelage. Pappy grew up in the segregated South and hid in closets so he could read Aesop and Plato. He envisioned for his son a lot in life greater than his own, and encouraged Williams to read and educate himself, and to embrace the opportunities that had not been available to Pappy's generation. As college approached and the stakes of the thug lifestyle escalated, the disparity between Williams' street life and home life threatened to undo him. Ultimately, Williams would have to decide between hip-hop and his future.
Thomas Chatterton Williams holds a Bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Georgetown University and a Master’s degree from the Cultural Reporting and Criticism program at New York University. In 2007, he wrote an op-ed piece entitled “Yes, Blame Hip-Hop” for the Washington Post which generated a record-breaking number of comments. He writes for the literary magazine n+1 and currently lives in Brooklyn.
 

Novelist Lauie Notaro on her "Spooky Little Girl"

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 07/08/2010

 

Host Ed Goldberg interviews Lauie Notaro, author of Spooky Little Girl, a funny novel about a woman whose life changes after she is killed by a bus.

Laurie Notaro was born in Brooklyn, New York, and raised in Phoenix, Arizona. She packed her bags for Eugene, Oregon, once she realized that since she was past thirty, her mother could no longer report her as a teenage runaway. She is the author of The Idiot Girls’ Action-Adventure Club, Autobiography of a Fat Bride, I Love Everybody, We Thought You’d Be Prettier, and An Idiot Girl’s Christmas.

Diane Hammond on "Seeing Stars," her novel on child actors in Hollywood

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 07/01/2010

 Host Ed Goldberg interviews Pacific Northwest writer Diane Hammond, author of Going to Bend, Homesick Creek, and Hannah's Dream. She talks about her latest book Seeing Stars, a novel about child actors in Hollywood with talent managers, agents, coaches, directors and teachers who nurture—and feed on—their ambitions.    

http://www.dianehammond.com/stars_chapter1.html 

The Battle for Gotham: New York in the Shadow of Robert Moses and Jane Jacobs

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 06/24/2010

Host Bruce Silverman speaks with Roberta Gratz, author of "The Battle for Gotham: New York in the Shadow of Robert Moses and Jane Jacobs." Urban critic and journalist Roberta Brandes Gratz argues that New York City regenerated itself because of the waning power of Robert Moses. His decline in the late 1960s and the drying up of big government funding for urban renewal projects allowed New York to organically regenerate according to the precepts defined by Jane Jacobs in her classic, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, and in contradiction to Moses's urban philosophy.

  • Length: 28:26 minutes (26.04 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Biographer Jimmy McDonough on "Tammy Wynette: Tragic Country Queen"

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 06/17/2010

  Host Ed Goldberg speaks with Jimmy McDonough, author of Tammy Wynette: Tragic Country Queen, a biography of the country music diva.

Jimmy McDonough’s biography of Neil Young, Shakey, was a critically acclaimed New York Times bestseller. He has also written biographies of Russ Meyer and Andy Milligan, and has written for publications including The Village Voice and Variety. He lives in Portland.

 

 Glen David Gold on his new novel "Sunnyside"

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Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 05/27/2010
Host Ed Goldberg interviews Glen David Gold, author of Sunnyside, a historical novel set during World War I. It features Charlie Chaplin and Rin Tin Tin.   Glen David Gold is the author of the best seller Carter Beats the Devil

Novelist Katie Arnoldi on "Point Dume," a tale of pot farms, surf culture and risk

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 05/20/2010
Katie Arnoldi, bestselling author of Chemical Pink and The Wentworths, talks about her latest novel, POINT DUME, a timely tale of pot farms, surf culture and risk.  Hosted by Lisa Loving.

Author Bill Morgan on "The Typewriter is Holy: The Complete Uncensored History of the Beat Generation"

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program: 
Between the Covers
program date: 
Thu, 05/13/2010

Kathleen Stephenson speaks with guest Bill Morgan, author of The Typewriter is Holy: The Complete Uncensored History of the Beat Generation, which explores the enduring revolutionary appeal of Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, and WilliamS. Burroughs and brings to light lesser known Beat artists like Alan Ansen and Joanne Kyger. Morgan is the author and editor of more than a dozen books about the Beat writers. 

Comments

Timber Beasts

I've read the book twice and rather hoped to hear the program that the author spoke on the book. But that page was not available on your site. Anyway, I loved the book. I thought it was an exciting dose of history. Stoner brought the Portland of  1900 to life. There was intrigue that kept my interest throughout the book.

Today's Interview

I was washing eggs at the farm when this came on. I loved it and looked for it to share with my peeps!

 

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