Audio by artist omvh

Bill Smaldone History of German Social Democrats Part Two

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program date: 
Mon, 08/27/2012

Bill Resnick continues his interview with Historian Bill Smaldone about the German Social Democratic Party. They discuss the split within the party over World War I, the Weimar Republic period of liberal democracy, developments after WW2 when social democrats developed a strong welfare state, with cooperation of more conservative elements who wanted to stave off both communism and fascism, and the more recent attempts of some party leaders to abandon their working-class constituency for the white-collar middle class. Despite the dispersal of working communities because of factory relocations and globalization, the expectation of a strong welfare state remains in Germany today as a counterweight to neoliberalism.

26:55 minutes (12.32 MB)

Book Mole: The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes

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program date: 
Mon, 08/27/2012

Larry Bowlden reviews the Man Booker prize winning novel The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes. While the first part of the book is a fine life story, the second makes it a profound work on the meaning of history as the point "where the imperfections of memory meet the inadequacies of documentation."

6:34 minutes (3.01 MB)

Politics of Full Employment

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program date: 
Mon, 08/27/2012

Clayton Morgareidge reads an essay by Michal Kalecki from Monthly Review, "Political Aspects of Full Employment," explaining why capitalists object to government support of full employment: without painful consequences to job loss, employers lose a powerful tool for coercing workers.

7:23 minutes (3.38 MB)

The Living Death of Solitary Confinement

program date: 
Mon, 08/27/2012
Iven Hale reads an essay by philosopher Lisa Guenther on "The Living Death of Solitary Confinement" on how forcible isolation destroys the capacity to understand the world, can lead to prisoners losing touch with reality, and fails to provide the opportunity and obligation to explain oneself to others. 8:33 minutes (3.91 MB)

Hunger and Agroecology

program date: 
Mon, 09/24/2012

Bill Resnick talks with Tristan Quinn-Thibodeau, Outreach and Partnerships Coordinator for the Global Movements Program of Why Hunger?. They discuss how the problem of hunger is affected by long-standing issues of commodity speculation, demand for biofuels, so-called free trade, and dismantling of state supports, as well as more recent factors like land sales and increasing production for export. They note that we have enough food to feed the world—the problem is not production but distribution.

20:15 minutes (9.27 MB)

Movie Moles on Samsara

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program date: 
Mon, 09/24/2012

Movie Moles Iven Hale and Jan Haaken discuss Samsara by the maker of the film Baraka. They agree the film has beautiful and compelling imagery, and offers a critique of commodity culture. Jan & Iven debate whether Samsara endorses a quietistic response to the dangers of capitalism, exploiting decontextualized images, or highlights the extent to which human suffering is created by capitalism. They conclude that it is worth seeing on the big screen.

9:21 minutes (4.28 MB)

Global Collapse, American Revolution

program date: 
Mon, 09/24/2012

Tom Becker reads from an essay on the collapse of the environment and economy by Chris Hedges, Why the Revolution must Start in America.

6:12 minutes (2.84 MB)

The Left and the Law: Open Borders

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program date: 
Mon, 09/24/2012

Appellate lawyer Mike Snedeker and psychologist Jan Haaken, who recently returned from a Fulbright study of asylum seekers in the UK, discuss the arguments for open borders. They note that although the idea may sound radical, it was the US policy regarding immigration and both northern and southern borders until recently. Libertarians and economic conservatives have argued for the economic benefit of immigration even as social conservatives have opposed open borders. Ironically, there are now more people emigrating out of the US than immigrating in, but there is panic about defending and closing borders, suggesting a narcissistic fantasy that everyone wants to come to the US.

15:09 minutes (6.94 MB)

Lichtenstein on Walmart Activism

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program date: 
Mon, 11/26/2012

Bill Resnick talks with labor historian Nelson Lichtenstein, Professor of History at the University of California Santa Barbara and author of The Retail Revolution: How Wal-Mart Created a Brave New World of Business and editor of Wal-Mart: The Face of Twenty-First-Century Capitalism, among other works. They discuss the Wal-Mart business model, its productive efficiency and success in the USA, the resistance Wal-Mart has faced in other parts of the world, and its strategies for blocking unionization and exploiting just-in-time labor.

19:24 minutes (8.88 MB)

The Left and the Law: History & Conversations on Oregon's Death Penalty

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Mon, 12/17/2012

The Left & the Law: Jan Haaken and Mike Snedeker discuss Governor Kitzhaber's "conversations" about the death penalty following his issuing a stay of execution for convicted murderer Gary Haugen. Jan and Mike discuss the shifts in attitudes toward capital punishment, which Oregon voters abolished in 1964 and reinstated in 1984.

[audio-player] 12:26 minutes (5.69 MB)

comments on young white men with guns

program date: 
Mon, 12/17/2012

Frann Michel offers some comments on recent gun violence, with links here.

[audio-player] 5:11 minutes (2.38 MB)

David Weiman on Mass Incarceration

program date: 
Mon, 02/25/2013

Bill Resnick talks with economist David Weiman about the political forces encouraging the growth and maintaining of prisons and punitive policing in the USA. They consider not only media influence and legislators desire to keep jobs in their areas but also the fear-enhancing effects of social isolation and division and the correlation between inequality and incarceration. They discuss the impact of widely available guns and lobbying in support of gun rights. They consider the role of mental health professionals, the use of psychoactive drugs, and the likelihood that mental illness is a consequence of incarceration rather than a cause of crime.

18:19 minutes (8.39 MB)

Book Mole: Where'd You Go, Bernadette?

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program date: 
Mon, 02/25/2013

Larry Bowlden reviews the novel Where'd You Go Bernadette? by Maria Semple , and finds the young narrator's story of life with her professional-class parents, and her mother's disappearance, very funny and engaging.

6:00 minutes (2.75 MB)

David Rovics Interview

program date: 
Mon, 02/25/2013

Alan Wieder talks with local singer-songwriter-activist David Rovics about his work, about living in Oregon, where the police have killed more black men per capita than anywhere else, about releasing songs online for free download, and about his new online book Have Guitar Will Travel.

16:59 minutes (7.77 MB)

A Place at the Table: movie moles review

program date: 
Mon, 03/25/2013

Denise Morris and Frann Michel discuss the documentary A Place at the Table, currently playing in Portland at the Hollywood Theatre, about the serious problem of food insecurity. The film makes vivid the struggles of some of the 50 million Americans who are food insecure, but provides an incomplete analysis. Although it dispels some myths (e.g., that hungry people will be skinny) it also perpetuates others (e.g., that fat is inherently unhealthy, that this issue mainly affects women of color).

10:19 minutes (4.72 MB)

Black Power and Soul Music

program date: 
Mon, 03/25/2013

Clayton Morgareidge talks with radical musicologist Brad Duncan about Black Power as the radicalizing of what had been the more integrationist civil rights movement, and about the roots of soul music in gospel and R&B. They discuss the role of music in preserving cultural memory of the Black Power movement, the time it took for the mainstream corporate music industry to accept musicians performing politically radical music, and the courage and importance of Nina Simone.

7:45 minutes (3.55 MB)

Jeff Shantz on Green Syndicalism

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program date: 
Mon, 04/22/2013

Joe Clement talks with Jeff Shantz about his book, Green Syndicalism: An Alternative Red / Green Vision. They discuss Shantz's history working for Greenpeace as the organization shifted from direct action to canvassing and lobbying, and the connections he made as an exploited canvasser with exploited workers in industries exploiting the natural world. The book draws on the theoretical work of Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe, but offers practical considerations of the needs of activist organizers to make connections across groups, and to integrate activism into daily life and workplaces. Part Two of the discussion (not broadcast) will be available soon.

13:35 minutes (6.22 MB)

Robert Dietz on Building a Sustainable Economy

program date: 
Mon, 04/22/2013

Bill Resnick talks with Robert Dietz, co-author with Dan O'Neill of Enough is Enough: Building a Sustainable Economy in a World of Finite Resources. Most people know the earth is on the wrong track—but how to change? Dietz proposes sharing work, guaranteed jobs (as in the Civilian Conservation Corps of the New Deal era), and more.

10:57 minutes (5.02 MB)

Graeber on the Coming Collapse

program date: 
Mon, 04/22/2013

Tom Becker reads from David Graeber's "Work it Out, Slow it Down," exerpted from his Practical Utopians Guide to the Coming Collapse, on the dangers of overproduction and the need to respond differently to economic and environmental crisis.

7:47 minutes (3.57 MB)

Just Give Everyone Food Stamps

program date: 
Mon, 04/22/2013

Joe Clement reads from Matt Breunig's blog on why we should just give everyone food stamps.

8:33 minutes (3.92 MB)

Resnick on Boston

program date: 
Mon, 04/22/2013
6:06 minutes (2.8 MB)

Boston fallout

program date: 
Mon, 04/22/2013

Bill Resnick comments on the recent events in Boston and the dangers of the rightist narrative that justifies further spending on police.

6:06 minutes (2.8 MB)

Gerald Markowitz on Untested New Chemicals

program date: 
Mon, 05/27/2013

Bill Resnick talks with Gerald Markowitz of John Jay College, author of "You Are a Guinea Pig: How Americans Became Exposed to Biohazards in the Greatest Uncontrolled Experiment Ever Launched" as well as numerous other articles and books. They discuss the pervasive use of untested chemicals (over 80,000) in the USA. The CDC has tested about 200 of these chemicals and have discovered Teflon, BPA, and other endocrine disruptors and carcinogens accumulated in our bodies. They discuss the unknown effects not only of 99% of the chemicals in use, but also the unknown interactions among the different chemicals.

17:35 minutes (8.05 MB)

Iven Hale on jails and prisons: No Fantasy

program date: 
Mon, 05/27/2013

Buffy the Vampire Slayer may ask a willing suspension of disbelief about the supernatural, but is simply in error on some real-world matters, including the difference between  jails (run by counties and holding those awaiting trial or serving short sentences for misdemeanors or certain other violations) and  prisons (longer-term, state-run or corporate-run).

8:14 minutes (3.78 MB)

Movie Moles on The Great Gatsby

program date: 
Mon, 05/27/2013

Movie moles Jan Haaken and Joe Clement on The Great Gatsby, a film that has beautiful cinematography but lacks the original novel's complexity and critique of commodity culture.

14:21 minutes (6.57 MB)

Left & the Law review the DSM-5

program date: 
Mon, 06/03/2013

Psychologist Jan Haaken and attorney Mike Snedeker discuss the latest revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual and some of the critiques of it . They discuss the benefits of having a common language and destigmatiing mental disorders, the proliferation of new categories and the risk it poses to credibility, and the problem of biologizing disorders and neglecting their social dimensions.

14:21 minutes (6.57 MB)

Nancy Kranich on the Informtio Commons

program date: 
Mon, 06/03/2013

Bill Resnick talks with librarian and information activist Nancy Kranich about problems of information access, privacy, and freedom—the digital divide; questions of cost, speed, and content restrictions; the cost of databases; conflicts over SOPA and PIPA; private and government surveillance of how we interact with our digital devices; copyright and creative commons; different perspectives held by librarians, publishers, government, and the general public; the importance of equal access to and control of information for democracy; and the shape of organizing around these issues.

20:36 minutes (9.43 MB)

Nancy Kranich on the Information Commons

program date: 
Mon, 06/03/2013

Bill Resnick talks with librarian and information activist Nancy Kranich about problems of information access, privacy, and freedom—the digital divide; questions of cost, speed, and content restrictions; the cost of databases; conflicts over SOPA and PIPA; private and government surveillance of how we interact with our digital devices; copyright and creative commons; different perspectives held by librarians, publishers, government, and the general public; the importance of equal access to and control of information for democracy; and the shape of organizing around these issues.

20:36 minutes (9.43 MB)

Movie Moles: The Reluctant Fundamentalist

program date: 
Mon, 06/03/2013

Movie Moles Frann Michel and Jan Haaken discuss Mira Nair's The Reluctant Fundamentalist, and the reluctance of many US reviewers to praise a compelling film that is critical of capitalism and the post-9/11 USA.

12:34 minutes (5.76 MB)

Chris Toensing on Egypt's Democratic Coup

program date: 
Mon, 07/22/2013

Chris Toensing of the Middle East Report talks with Bill Resnick about the recent overthrow of the Muslim Brotherhood government elected a year ago in Egypt. Arguing that Morsi's government continued a number of Mubarak's neoliberal economic policies that are repressive to labor, and that it failed to provide needed order and services, Toensing suggests understanding Morsi's ouster as a kind of democratically-popular coup, and a continuation of the popular calls that began three years ago for bread, freedom, and social justice. But for the US government to recognize the events as a coup would entail a change of US policy toward Egypt.

17:11 minutes (7.87 MB)

Putting the Pub in Public and the Public in the Pub: A Worker-Controlled Venture

program date: 
Mon, 07/22/2013

Joe Clement discusses a movie mole review of the documentary Shift Change on worker-owned cooperatives, and talks with Adam and Daisy about their plans for a collectively-owned and -run pub in Portland.

For more information or to make suggestions, attend a potluck in Laurelhurst Park on Friday July 26th; games, food, and beer will be available starting at 4 pm.

10:37 minutes (4.87 MB)

Book Mole: The Life of Objects

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program date: 
Mon, 07/22/2013

Book Mole Larry Bowlden reviews Susanna Moore's novel The Life of Objects. It's about WWII seen through the eyes of a poor young Irish woman who is invited to the home of a wealthy German family to make lace. It begins in 1938. The family (though previously politically influential) retreats from Nazi politics, and in fact, retreats to a country estate where most of the book takes place. Having refused a foreign ambassador position under the Nazi's, the male landowner is under increasing scrutiny. Larry finds it to be a wonderful novel about how German resisters lived through the war and how they were treated as Russian and American forces entered Germany.

7:48 minutes (3.57 MB)

Yasmin Nair on ENDA

program date: 
Mon, 07/22/2013

Denise Morris talks with Yasmin Nair about the Employment Non-Discrimination Act and its limits. They discuss changes in the current version of the law and its assumptions about the innate nature of sexual identity and the kinds of trans* presentation it would protect. Nair observes that while the Act would have symbolic importance and legal usefulness, real change cannot rely only on the courts. Though advocates of ENDA point out that it is legal to fire someone for being gay or trans in 34 states, Nair points out that it is legal to fire someone for no reason in 49 states where at-will employment law prevails.

13:16 minutes (6.08 MB)

Howie Hawkins on Class Struggle in Labor and Party Politics

program date: 
Mon, 01/06/2014
Bill Resnick talks with Howie Hawkins, labor activist and former Green Party candidate in New York state. They discuss labor conditions at UPS and the speed-up tactics there, the Teamsters and Teamsters for a Democratic Union, capital mobility and so-called free trade.
21:12 minutes (9.7 MB)

Zapatista Resistance to neoliberalism

program date: 
Mon, 01/06/2014

Well-Read Red Frann Michel considers the twenty years of NAFTA and of Zapatista resistance to NAFTA and neoliberalism. You can read a longer version of this piece, with links to sources, here on her blog.
7:54 minutes (3.62 MB)

Basic Income: curious utopia

program date: 
Mon, 01/06/2014
Joe Clement reads from a Jacobin magazine article about basic income, nonreformist reforms, and utopian thinking on the capitalist road to communism.
8:55 minutes (4.08 MB)

Yasmin Nair on the Trouble with Hate Crimes Law

program date: 
Mon, 01/06/2014


Denise Morris talks with Yasmin Nair of Against Equality about the ten years since the murder of Brandon Teena, and about how hate crimes legislation can result in increased surveillance and punishment of the very marginlized communities it is ostensibly meant to protect.

See also Nair's article on Why Hate Crimes Legislation is a Bad Idea; her review of a recent book on Matthew Shepard, and these other articles on the issues:
13:00 minutes (5.95 MB)

Mark Weisbrot on Venezuela

program date: 
Mon, 03/03/2014
Bill Resnick talks with Mark Weisbrot about recent upheavals in Ukraine and especially in Venezuela, where the right-wing protesters lack the leverage to oust the recently elected government.   Mark Weisbrot is co-director of the Centre for Economic and Policy Research in Washington DC, president of Just Foreign Policy, and a columnist for The Guardian. 14:56 minutes (6.84 MB)

Movie Moles on Orgasm, Inc

program date: 
Mon, 03/03/2014
Denise Morris and Frann Michel discuss the 2009 documentary Orgasm, Inc, on attempts to medicalize women's sexuality. The film is available at the Multnomah County Library. More information here. 12:02 minutes (5.51 MB)

Mom Baby God

program date: 
Mon, 03/03/2014
Jan Haaken talks with Madeline Burrows about her one-woman performance coming to Portland March 5 & 6. The product of two years of immersive research, MOM BABY GOD follows Jessica Beth Giffords, a peppy, Justin Bieber-obsessed 15-year-old and zealous anti-abortion video blogger, as she navigates the political terrain at the Students for Life of America Conference. Through Jessica’s eyes, MOM BABY GOD explores the ways girls navigate their sexuality amidst a sexually repressive—and sexist—attack on reproductive rights. 12:35 minutes (5.76 MB)

Patricia Schechter on Possible PSU Faculty Strike

program date: 
Mon, 03/31/2014
Bill Resnick talks with History Professor Patricia Schechter of Portland State University's faculty union, the American Association of University Professors, about why faculty are ready to strike after 10 months of bargaining. They discuss faculty stability, pay equity, and educator-led education and the importance of broad and lifelong learning and the liberal arts, as against administration focus on the needs of short-term business profit. Both students and faculty are in economically untenable positions, with mounting pressures and mounting debt. But students and faculty are in solidarity in supporting each other and the need for lifelong learning.

17:16 minutes (7.91 MB)

On Wage Work and Wanting Less of It

program date: 
Mon, 03/31/2014
Joe Clement talks with Peter Frase about the desirability of working less, the possibility of the shorter work week, and the nature of wage and other labor. They discuss the productivity and problems of wage labor and the value of what is known as "free time"; the varied possible meanings of "full employment"; and the need for collective struggles to change the balance of power in the labor market. They touch on Kathi Weeks' book on The Problem with Work, and the importance of unwaged and immaterial labor. Joe mentions his interview last week with Anna Coote, available here: https://kboo.fm/content/towarda30hourworkweek. 13:26 minutes (6.15 MB)

Book Mole: Lively Memoir

program date: 
Mon, 03/31/2014
Larry Bowlden reviews Penelope Lively's not-quite-memoir Dancing Fish and Ammonites, dispatches from Old Age, which, unlike much writing on later life, focuses on what is left rather than what is lost with age. Larry surveys a number of works from Lively's prizewinning literary career, which, like this new volume, has focused on memory and history, writing and reading.


7:13 minutes (3.3 MB)

Rethinking Psychiatry Film Festival

program date: 
Mon, 03/31/2014

Jan Haaken talks with Grace Silvia about the Rethinking Psychiatry Film Festival.  The organization Rethinking Psychiatry is an activist organization trying to shift away from pathologizing and toward recognizing a variety of ways of being in the world, toward recognizing that psychological suffering is often a result of problems in society or a consequence of trauma, and toward countering the pharmaceutical industry's model of easy cures for the spiritual or medical ailments of modern life. The first night's videos April 2nd explore the Soteria model of being with people going through psychotic breaks with no or minimal medication. 11:41 minutes (5.35 MB)

 

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