Audio by artist omvh

Bill Smaldone History of German Social Democrats Part Two

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program date: 
Mon, 08/27/2012

Bill Resnick continues his interview with Historian Bill Smaldone about the German Social Democratic Party. They discuss the split within the party over World War I, the Weimar Republic period of liberal democracy, developments after WW2 when social democrats developed a strong welfare state, with cooperation of more conservative elements who wanted to stave off both communism and fascism, and the more recent attempts of some party leaders to abandon their working-class constituency for the white-collar middle class. Despite the dispersal of working communities because of factory relocations and globalization, the expectation of a strong welfare state remains in Germany today as a counterweight to neoliberalism.

26:55 minutes (12.32 MB)

Book Mole: The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes

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program date: 
Mon, 08/27/2012

Larry Bowlden reviews the Man Booker prize winning novel The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes. While the first part of the book is a fine life story, the second makes it a profound work on the meaning of history as the point "where the imperfections of memory meet the inadequacies of documentation."

6:34 minutes (3.01 MB)

Politics of Full Employment

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program date: 
Mon, 08/27/2012

Clayton Morgareidge reads an essay by Michal Kalecki from Monthly Review, "Political Aspects of Full Employment," explaining why capitalists object to government support of full employment: without painful consequences to job loss, employers lose a powerful tool for coercing workers.

7:23 minutes (3.38 MB)

The Living Death of Solitary Confinement

program date: 
Mon, 08/27/2012
Iven Hale reads an essay by philosopher Lisa Guenther on "The Living Death of Solitary Confinement" on how forcible isolation destroys the capacity to understand the world, can lead to prisoners losing touch with reality, and fails to provide the opportunity and obligation to explain oneself to others. 8:33 minutes (3.91 MB)

Hunger and Agroecology

program date: 
Mon, 09/24/2012

Bill Resnick talks with Tristan Quinn-Thibodeau, Outreach and Partnerships Coordinator for the Global Movements Program of Why Hunger?. They discuss how the problem of hunger is affected by long-standing issues of commodity speculation, demand for biofuels, so-called free trade, and dismantling of state supports, as well as more recent factors like land sales and increasing production for export. They note that we have enough food to feed the world—the problem is not production but distribution.

20:15 minutes (9.27 MB)

Movie Moles on Samsara

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program date: 
Mon, 09/24/2012

Movie Moles Iven Hale and Jan Haaken discuss Samsara by the maker of the film Baraka. They agree the film has beautiful and compelling imagery, and offers a critique of commodity culture. Jan & Iven debate whether Samsara endorses a quietistic response to the dangers of capitalism, exploiting decontextualized images, or highlights the extent to which human suffering is created by capitalism. They conclude that it is worth seeing on the big screen.

9:21 minutes (4.28 MB)

Global Collapse, American Revolution

program date: 
Mon, 09/24/2012

Tom Becker reads from an essay on the collapse of the environment and economy by Chris Hedges, Why the Revolution must Start in America.

6:12 minutes (2.84 MB)

The Left and the Law: Open Borders

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program date: 
Mon, 09/24/2012

Appellate lawyer Mike Snedeker and psychologist Jan Haaken, who recently returned from a Fulbright study of asylum seekers in the UK, discuss the arguments for open borders. They note that although the idea may sound radical, it was the US policy regarding immigration and both northern and southern borders until recently. Libertarians and economic conservatives have argued for the economic benefit of immigration even as social conservatives have opposed open borders. Ironically, there are now more people emigrating out of the US than immigrating in, but there is panic about defending and closing borders, suggesting a narcissistic fantasy that everyone wants to come to the US.

15:09 minutes (6.94 MB)

Lichtenstein on Walmart Activism

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program date: 
Mon, 11/26/2012

Bill Resnick talks with labor historian Nelson Lichtenstein, Professor of History at the University of California Santa Barbara and author of The Retail Revolution: How Wal-Mart Created a Brave New World of Business and editor of Wal-Mart: The Face of Twenty-First-Century Capitalism, among other works. They discuss the Wal-Mart business model, its productive efficiency and success in the USA, the resistance Wal-Mart has faced in other parts of the world, and its strategies for blocking unionization and exploiting just-in-time labor.

19:24 minutes (8.88 MB)

The Left and the Law: History & Conversations on Oregon's Death Penalty

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Mon, 12/17/2012

The Left & the Law: Jan Haaken and Mike Snedeker discuss Governor Kitzhaber's "conversations" about the death penalty following his issuing a stay of execution for convicted murderer Gary Haugen. Jan and Mike discuss the shifts in attitudes toward capital punishment, which Oregon voters abolished in 1964 and reinstated in 1984.

[audio-player] 12:26 minutes (5.69 MB)

comments on young white men with guns

program date: 
Mon, 12/17/2012

Frann Michel offers some comments on recent gun violence, with links here.

[audio-player] 5:11 minutes (2.38 MB)

David Weiman on Mass Incarceration

program date: 
Mon, 02/25/2013

Bill Resnick talks with economist David Weiman about the political forces encouraging the growth and maintaining of prisons and punitive policing in the USA. They consider not only media influence and legislators desire to keep jobs in their areas but also the fear-enhancing effects of social isolation and division and the correlation between inequality and incarceration. They discuss the impact of widely available guns and lobbying in support of gun rights. They consider the role of mental health professionals, the use of psychoactive drugs, and the likelihood that mental illness is a consequence of incarceration rather than a cause of crime.

18:19 minutes (8.39 MB)

Book Mole: Where'd You Go, Bernadette?

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program date: 
Mon, 02/25/2013

Larry Bowlden reviews the novel Where'd You Go Bernadette? by Maria Semple , and finds the young narrator's story of life with her professional-class parents, and her mother's disappearance, very funny and engaging.

6:00 minutes (2.75 MB)

David Rovics Interview

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Mon, 02/25/2013

Alan Wieder talks with local singer-songwriter-activist David Rovics about his work, about living in Oregon, where the police have killed more black men per capita than anywhere else, about releasing songs online for free download, and about his new online book Have Guitar Will Travel.

16:59 minutes (7.77 MB)

A Place at the Table: movie moles review

program date: 
Mon, 03/25/2013

Denise Morris and Frann Michel discuss the documentary A Place at the Table, currently playing in Portland at the Hollywood Theatre, about the serious problem of food insecurity. The film makes vivid the struggles of some of the 50 million Americans who are food insecure, but provides an incomplete analysis. Although it dispels some myths (e.g., that hungry people will be skinny) it also perpetuates others (e.g., that fat is inherently unhealthy, that this issue mainly affects women of color).

10:19 minutes (4.72 MB)

Black Power and Soul Music

program date: 
Mon, 03/25/2013

Clayton Morgareidge talks with radical musicologist Brad Duncan about Black Power as the radicalizing of what had been the more integrationist civil rights movement, and about the roots of soul music in gospel and R&B. They discuss the role of music in preserving cultural memory of the Black Power movement, the time it took for the mainstream corporate music industry to accept musicians performing politically radical music, and the courage and importance of Nina Simone.

7:45 minutes (3.55 MB)

Jeff Shantz on Green Syndicalism

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program date: 
Mon, 04/22/2013

Joe Clement talks with Jeff Shantz about his book, Green Syndicalism: An Alternative Red / Green Vision. They discuss Shantz's history working for Greenpeace as the organization shifted from direct action to canvassing and lobbying, and the connections he made as an exploited canvasser with exploited workers in industries exploiting the natural world. The book draws on the theoretical work of Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe, but offers practical considerations of the needs of activist organizers to make connections across groups, and to integrate activism into daily life and workplaces. Part Two of the discussion (not broadcast) will be available soon.

13:35 minutes (6.22 MB)

Robert Dietz on Building a Sustainable Economy

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Mon, 04/22/2013

Bill Resnick talks with Robert Dietz, co-author with Dan O'Neill of Enough is Enough: Building a Sustainable Economy in a World of Finite Resources. Most people know the earth is on the wrong track—but how to change? Dietz proposes sharing work, guaranteed jobs (as in the Civilian Conservation Corps of the New Deal era), and more.

10:57 minutes (5.02 MB)

Graeber on the Coming Collapse

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Mon, 04/22/2013

Tom Becker reads from David Graeber's "Work it Out, Slow it Down," exerpted from his Practical Utopians Guide to the Coming Collapse, on the dangers of overproduction and the need to respond differently to economic and environmental crisis.

7:47 minutes (3.57 MB)

Just Give Everyone Food Stamps

program date: 
Mon, 04/22/2013

Joe Clement reads from Matt Breunig's blog on why we should just give everyone food stamps.

8:33 minutes (3.92 MB)

Resnick on Boston

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Mon, 04/22/2013
6:06 minutes (2.8 MB)

Boston fallout

program date: 
Mon, 04/22/2013

Bill Resnick comments on the recent events in Boston and the dangers of the rightist narrative that justifies further spending on police.

6:06 minutes (2.8 MB)

Gerald Markowitz on Untested New Chemicals

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Mon, 05/27/2013

Bill Resnick talks with Gerald Markowitz of John Jay College, author of "You Are a Guinea Pig: How Americans Became Exposed to Biohazards in the Greatest Uncontrolled Experiment Ever Launched" as well as numerous other articles and books. They discuss the pervasive use of untested chemicals (over 80,000) in the USA. The CDC has tested about 200 of these chemicals and have discovered Teflon, BPA, and other endocrine disruptors and carcinogens accumulated in our bodies. They discuss the unknown effects not only of 99% of the chemicals in use, but also the unknown interactions among the different chemicals.

17:35 minutes (8.05 MB)

Iven Hale on jails and prisons: No Fantasy

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Mon, 05/27/2013

Buffy the Vampire Slayer may ask a willing suspension of disbelief about the supernatural, but is simply in error on some real-world matters, including the difference between  jails (run by counties and holding those awaiting trial or serving short sentences for misdemeanors or certain other violations) and  prisons (longer-term, state-run or corporate-run).

8:14 minutes (3.78 MB)

Movie Moles on The Great Gatsby

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Mon, 05/27/2013

Movie moles Jan Haaken and Joe Clement on The Great Gatsby, a film that has beautiful cinematography but lacks the original novel's complexity and critique of commodity culture.

14:21 minutes (6.57 MB)

Left & the Law review the DSM-5

program date: 
Mon, 06/03/2013

Psychologist Jan Haaken and attorney Mike Snedeker discuss the latest revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual and some of the critiques of it . They discuss the benefits of having a common language and destigmatiing mental disorders, the proliferation of new categories and the risk it poses to credibility, and the problem of biologizing disorders and neglecting their social dimensions.

14:21 minutes (6.57 MB)

Nancy Kranich on the Informtio Commons

program date: 
Mon, 06/03/2013

Bill Resnick talks with librarian and information activist Nancy Kranich about problems of information access, privacy, and freedom—the digital divide; questions of cost, speed, and content restrictions; the cost of databases; conflicts over SOPA and PIPA; private and government surveillance of how we interact with our digital devices; copyright and creative commons; different perspectives held by librarians, publishers, government, and the general public; the importance of equal access to and control of information for democracy; and the shape of organizing around these issues.

20:36 minutes (9.43 MB)

Nancy Kranich on the Information Commons

program date: 
Mon, 06/03/2013

Bill Resnick talks with librarian and information activist Nancy Kranich about problems of information access, privacy, and freedom—the digital divide; questions of cost, speed, and content restrictions; the cost of databases; conflicts over SOPA and PIPA; private and government surveillance of how we interact with our digital devices; copyright and creative commons; different perspectives held by librarians, publishers, government, and the general public; the importance of equal access to and control of information for democracy; and the shape of organizing around these issues.

20:36 minutes (9.43 MB)

Movie Moles: The Reluctant Fundamentalist

program date: 
Mon, 06/03/2013

Movie Moles Frann Michel and Jan Haaken discuss Mira Nair's The Reluctant Fundamentalist, and the reluctance of many US reviewers to praise a compelling film that is critical of capitalism and the post-9/11 USA.

12:34 minutes (5.76 MB)

Chris Toensing on Egypt's Democratic Coup

program date: 
Mon, 07/22/2013

Chris Toensing of the Middle East Report talks with Bill Resnick about the recent overthrow of the Muslim Brotherhood government elected a year ago in Egypt. Arguing that Morsi's government continued a number of Mubarak's neoliberal economic policies that are repressive to labor, and that it failed to provide needed order and services, Toensing suggests understanding Morsi's ouster as a kind of democratically-popular coup, and a continuation of the popular calls that began three years ago for bread, freedom, and social justice. But for the US government to recognize the events as a coup would entail a change of US policy toward Egypt.

17:11 minutes (7.87 MB)

Putting the Pub in Public and the Public in the Pub: A Worker-Controlled Venture

program date: 
Mon, 07/22/2013

Joe Clement discusses a movie mole review of the documentary Shift Change on worker-owned cooperatives, and talks with Adam and Daisy about their plans for a collectively-owned and -run pub in Portland.

For more information or to make suggestions, attend a potluck in Laurelhurst Park on Friday July 26th; games, food, and beer will be available starting at 4 pm.

10:37 minutes (4.87 MB)

Book Mole: The Life of Objects

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program date: 
Mon, 07/22/2013

Book Mole Larry Bowlden reviews Susanna Moore's novel The Life of Objects. It's about WWII seen through the eyes of a poor young Irish woman who is invited to the home of a wealthy German family to make lace. It begins in 1938. The family (though previously politically influential) retreats from Nazi politics, and in fact, retreats to a country estate where most of the book takes place. Having refused a foreign ambassador position under the Nazi's, the male landowner is under increasing scrutiny. Larry finds it to be a wonderful novel about how German resisters lived through the war and how they were treated as Russian and American forces entered Germany.

7:48 minutes (3.57 MB)

Yasmin Nair on ENDA

program date: 
Mon, 07/22/2013

Denise Morris talks with Yasmin Nair about the Employment Non-Discrimination Act and its limits. They discuss changes in the current version of the law and its assumptions about the innate nature of sexual identity and the kinds of trans* presentation it would protect. Nair observes that while the Act would have symbolic importance and legal usefulness, real change cannot rely only on the courts. Though advocates of ENDA point out that it is legal to fire someone for being gay or trans in 34 states, Nair points out that it is legal to fire someone for no reason in 49 states where at-will employment law prevails.

13:16 minutes (6.08 MB)

Howie Hawkins on Class Struggle in Labor and Party Politics

program date: 
Mon, 01/06/2014
Bill Resnick talks with Howie Hawkins, labor activist and former Green Party candidate in New York state. They discuss labor conditions at UPS and the speed-up tactics there, the Teamsters and Teamsters for a Democratic Union, capital mobility and so-called free trade.
21:12 minutes (9.7 MB)

Zapatista Resistance to neoliberalism

program date: 
Mon, 01/06/2014

Well-Read Red Frann Michel considers the twenty years of NAFTA and of Zapatista resistance to NAFTA and neoliberalism. You can read a longer version of this piece, with links to sources, here on her blog.
7:54 minutes (3.62 MB)

Basic Income: curious utopia

program date: 
Mon, 01/06/2014
Joe Clement reads from a Jacobin magazine article about basic income, nonreformist reforms, and utopian thinking on the capitalist road to communism.
8:55 minutes (4.08 MB)

Yasmin Nair on the Trouble with Hate Crimes Law

program date: 
Mon, 01/06/2014


Denise Morris talks with Yasmin Nair of Against Equality about the ten years since the murder of Brandon Teena, and about how hate crimes legislation can result in increased surveillance and punishment of the very marginlized communities it is ostensibly meant to protect.

See also Nair's article on Why Hate Crimes Legislation is a Bad Idea; her review of a recent book on Matthew Shepard, and these other articles on the issues:
13:00 minutes (5.95 MB)

Mark Weisbrot on Venezuela

program date: 
Mon, 03/03/2014
Bill Resnick talks with Mark Weisbrot about recent upheavals in Ukraine and especially in Venezuela, where the right-wing protesters lack the leverage to oust the recently elected government.   Mark Weisbrot is co-director of the Centre for Economic and Policy Research in Washington DC, president of Just Foreign Policy, and a columnist for The Guardian. 14:56 minutes (6.84 MB)

Movie Moles on Orgasm, Inc

program date: 
Mon, 03/03/2014
Denise Morris and Frann Michel discuss the 2009 documentary Orgasm, Inc, on attempts to medicalize women's sexuality. The film is available at the Multnomah County Library. More information here. 12:02 minutes (5.51 MB)

Mom Baby God

program date: 
Mon, 03/03/2014
Jan Haaken talks with Madeline Burrows about her one-woman performance coming to Portland March 5 & 6. The product of two years of immersive research, MOM BABY GOD follows Jessica Beth Giffords, a peppy, Justin Bieber-obsessed 15-year-old and zealous anti-abortion video blogger, as she navigates the political terrain at the Students for Life of America Conference. Through Jessica’s eyes, MOM BABY GOD explores the ways girls navigate their sexuality amidst a sexually repressive—and sexist—attack on reproductive rights. 12:35 minutes (5.76 MB)

Patricia Schechter on Possible PSU Faculty Strike

program date: 
Mon, 03/31/2014
Bill Resnick talks with History Professor Patricia Schechter of Portland State University's faculty union, the American Association of University Professors, about why faculty are ready to strike after 10 months of bargaining. They discuss faculty stability, pay equity, and educator-led education and the importance of broad and lifelong learning and the liberal arts, as against administration focus on the needs of short-term business profit. Both students and faculty are in economically untenable positions, with mounting pressures and mounting debt. But students and faculty are in solidarity in supporting each other and the need for lifelong learning.

17:16 minutes (7.91 MB)

On Wage Work and Wanting Less of It

program date: 
Mon, 03/31/2014
Joe Clement talks with Peter Frase about the desirability of working less, the possibility of the shorter work week, and the nature of wage and other labor. They discuss the productivity and problems of wage labor and the value of what is known as "free time"; the varied possible meanings of "full employment"; and the need for collective struggles to change the balance of power in the labor market. They touch on Kathi Weeks' book on The Problem with Work, and the importance of unwaged and immaterial labor. Joe mentions his interview last week with Anna Coote, available here: https://kboo.fm/content/towarda30hourworkweek. 13:26 minutes (6.15 MB)

Book Mole: Lively Memoir

program date: 
Mon, 03/31/2014
Larry Bowlden reviews Penelope Lively's not-quite-memoir Dancing Fish and Ammonites, dispatches from Old Age, which, unlike much writing on later life, focuses on what is left rather than what is lost with age. Larry surveys a number of works from Lively's prizewinning literary career, which, like this new volume, has focused on memory and history, writing and reading.


7:13 minutes (3.3 MB)

Rethinking Psychiatry Film Festival

program date: 
Mon, 03/31/2014

Jan Haaken talks with Grace Silvia about the Rethinking Psychiatry Film Festival.  The organization Rethinking Psychiatry is an activist organization trying to shift away from pathologizing and toward recognizing a variety of ways of being in the world, toward recognizing that psychological suffering is often a result of problems in society or a consequence of trauma, and toward countering the pharmaceutical industry's model of easy cures for the spiritual or medical ailments of modern life. The first night's videos April 2nd explore the Soteria model of being with people going through psychotic breaks with no or minimal medication. 11:41 minutes (5.35 MB)

the Left & the Law: the Innocence Project

program date: 
Mon, 04/28/2014
Jan Haaken and Mike Snediker discuss the Innocence Project which seeks to free those wrongfully convicted of crimes. They discuss the development of DNA technology that made it possible to discover the large numbers of wrongful convictions, and the reasons for those many miscarriages of justice—including tunnel vision or confirmatory bias, police and prosecutorial misconduct, and mistaken eyewitnesses. Juries are still instructed to consider the level of confidence of eyewitnesses, even though there is no relation between confidence and accuracy. 
13:15 minutes (6.07 MB)

Increasing Incarceration of Women and Girls in Oregon

program date: 
Mon, 04/28/2014
Iven Hale and Frann Michel report on a Partnership for Safety and Justice panel discussion about the increasing incarceration of women and girls in Oregon. 10:50 minutes (4.96 MB)

Living Stages Presents Working-Class Poetry Open Mike

program date: 
Mon, 04/28/2014
Joe Clement talks with Tamara Lynne and Daisy Montague of Living Stages, a branch of the Theatre of the Oppressed, which will be hosting a Working-Class Poets Open Mike on May 2nd. 6:57 minutes (3.19 MB)

Bill Resnick talks with Mike Parker of the Richmond (CA) Progressive Alliance

program date: 
Mon, 04/28/2014
Bill Resnick interviews Mike Parker, Progressive Alliance candidate for Mayor of Richmond, California. They discuss Richmond's battles with Chevron over its Richmond refinery, the corporation's failure to pay taxes, the pollution the refinery causes, and the company's attempts to continue polluting with ever-cruder and more dangerous fossil fuels, as well as Richmond's pioneering work in solar energy. The Richmond Progressive Alliance accepts no corporate funding and is battling the money Chevron is pouring into trying to recapture the city council. More than a political party, the RPA works through grassroots community organizing and forming alliances with other groups. 20:37 minutes (9.44 MB)

Juan Cole on Gaza

program date: 
Mon, 07/28/2014

Laurie Mercier talks with historian and Middle-East specialist Juan Cole about current events in Gaza. They discuss Israel's motives in launching its attack, and the history of Israel's occupation of Palestine, attacks on Hamas, and expansion of settlements in the West Bank. In addition, Laurie and Professor Cole discuss the role of the US: the failure of much of the US mainstream media to report adequately on events in Palestine; the US support for Israel; the impact of financial contributions on corrupt US legislators; and the possibility that the US could make all the difference by withholding its veto of UN security-council measures censuring Israel. 18:14 minutes (8.35 MB)

Nic Caleb on Portland's Climate Plan

program date: 
Mon, 06/22/2015

Bill Resnick talks with Nic Caleb about the Portland Climate Action Plan that is set for a  City Council hearing this coming Wednesday, June 24. Caleb is the Climate Law Fellow at Our Children's Trust and teaches at Concordia College. He's devoted much time to working with climate action groups in Eugene, Oregon on Eugene's Climate Action Plan. 20:15 minutes (9.27 MB)

Left & the Law: Relations of Inmates & Guards

program date: 
Mon, 06/22/2015

Left & the Law: "The charges against a prison tailor accused of helping two convicted murders escape from a maximum security facility in upstate New York have cast a spotlight on relationships between inmates and correctional staff." Jan and Mike also put a spot-light on those relationships, talking about relations between inmates and correctional officers, from exceptional cases to the ordinary situations that are more complex than indicated in the famous Stanford Prison Study. 10:59 minutes (5.03 MB)

Sophie Smith on Border Community Actions

program date: 
Mon, 06/22/2015

On May 27th, a coalition of rural community groups on the U.S.-Mexico border held a joint day of action. Border residents held teach-ins, vigils, marches, and took direct action to protest border militarization. 11:22 minutes (5.21 MB)

Dan Handelman of Portland Copwatch on Police Violence & Militarism

program date: 
Mon, 08/03/2015
Bill Resnick talks with Dan Handelman of Portland CopWatch. They consider two aspects of police conduct -- their use of violence and shooting, and their militarization -- and the extent to which the police have responded to criticism by community reform groups as well as local and federal investigations of their conduct. Dan suggests that although there is more public attention to police violence, it has neither increased nor diminished in recent years, and discusses the excessive weaponry and the role of various branches including the Joint Terrorism Task Force, the Red Squad, and the Gang Enforcement Squad.

Image via Wikipedia

13:52 minutes (6.35 MB)

Democracy Rising against Capitalism in Greece

program date: 
Mon, 08/03/2015


Recently back from the "Democracy Rising" conference in Athens, Frann Michel and Hyung Nam discuss democracy and its contradictions in Greece.

(scroll down for the audio link)

(Image via GCAS)

Here are links to sources for some of the points they mention:

Democracy Rising conference call for papers 18:42 minutes (8.56 MB)

Operation Homestead: liberating housing in 1990s Seattle

program date: 
Mon, 08/03/2015
Desiree Hellegers interviews Seattle housing justice activists Ginger Segel and Bob Kubiniec about their work in the 1980s and 1990s with  Operation Homestead, breaking into and liberating abandoned or unused buildings for people to live in.

image by Dana Schuerholz via Radical Seattle Remembers


11:57 minutes (5.47 MB)

Ismael Hossein-zadeh on Middle East Politics

program date: 
Mon, 09/28/2015

Bill Resnick talks with Ismael Hossein-zadeh about events in the Middle East. Hossein-zadeh is Emeritus Professor of Economics at Drake University and an expert on Middle East issues. He describes the legacy of the cold war, when "Arab socialism" was supported by the USSR while monarchies and dictatorships were supported by the US. After the fall of the Berlin Wall, Americans hoped for a post-cold-war "peace dividend," in which the military budget would be redirected to supporting social needs. 17:15 minutes (7.9 MB)

Movie Moles on Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution

program date: 
Mon, 09/28/2015

Movie Moles Jan Haaken and Denise Morris discuss the new documentary The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution. The film opens in Portland next week at the  Hollywood theatre with a benefit event for the NAACP. Noting the impossibility of fully addressing all the many issues in the history of the Panthers--their relations to other social movements in the US and around the globe; their commitment to armed self-defense; their contributions as community service organization; their seductive style and media savvy; their complex politics of vanguardism and grassroots activism; their erosion and destruction by government infiltration and murde 14:08 minutes (6.47 MB)

Fear of Marx

program date: 
Mon, 09/28/2015

Tom Becker reads from Why the US Press is Afraid of Marx (and Jeremy Corbyn) by Conor Lynch in Counterpunch.  

In Marx’s analysis, widespread inequality and economic instability (and to a lesser degree environmental degradation) are inherent in the capitalist system, and they will eventually result in its collapse.
5:34 minutes (2.55 MB)

Gaining Ground Farming Doc

program date: 
Mon, 09/28/2015

Jan Haaken talks with Elaine Velazquez and Barbara Bernstein about their new documentary: Gaining Ground tells the stories of two rural farms in Oregon and an urban farm in inner city Richmond, California, resisting the systems of agribusiness and changing their farming practices so they can feed their local communities healthy sustainably grown food. Bridging urban and rural, challenging the simplistic romance of the small family farm in favor of wider community solutions, the film explores both problems in our food system and inspiring stories. The filmmakers will be present at the 7pm Sept 1 screening at Cinema 21.

13:06 minutes (6 MB)

Robin Hahnel on the Next System

program date: 
Mon, 10/19/2015

Bill Resnick talks with Robin Hahnel, who teaches (an emeritus of American U now at PSU), writes, speaks, and is deeply engaged in grass roots struggles towards building that other possible necessary world, that democratic and sustainable alternative. His books include Green Economics: Confronting the Ecological Crisis, Socialism Today and Tomorrow, and The ABCs of Political-Economy. 15:04 minutes (6.9 MB)

Columbia Riverkeeper: Saving the NW and Planet

program date: 
Mon, 10/19/2015

Desiree Hellegers talks with Dan Serres of Columbia Riverkeeper about the fossil fuel struggle. They discuss the disastrous effects of the planned Liquified Natural Gas Export Terminals and the need to stand up to the oil companies. They mention the successful citizen action to stop the Bradwood LNG project, and also note an upcoming event for more information and to make connections with others working on these issues:
14:13 minutes (6.51 MB)

Book Mole on Kent Haruf

Categories:
program date: 
Mon, 10/19/2015

Book mole Larry Bowlden reviews the work of the late Kent Haruf, and recommends the work of this quiet writer of the heart, who writes in simple, direct prose; Larry particularly discusses his novels Plainsong, Benediction, Eventide, and the posthumously published Our Souls at Night.

You can find more of Larry's reviews here.

6:43 minutes (3.08 MB)

Kathy Farr on School Shootings

program date: 
Mon, 10/19/2015

Jan Haaken interviews Kathy Farr, professor emeritus at PSU, on her current research on school shootings. She looks at middle and high school rampage shootings over the past 30 years and takes up some of the gender and social dynamics that seem to be driving these expressions of rage. They note the inadequacy of simply calling for more mental health counseling.


[ image from wikimedia commons]
13:21 minutes (6.11 MB)

Rebecca Gordon on Syria

Categories:
program date: 
Mon, 11/02/2015
map of syria
Bill Resnick interviews Rebecca Gordon on the negotiations -- including Russia and Iran -- to find a path toward stopping the killing in Syria. Will this be a model for reconstructing the middle east? Not if the U.S. continues to support Saudi Arabia and its insistence on dominating and destroying its challengers. Rebecca Gordon teaches in the Philosophy dept. at the University of San Francisco. Her new book American Nuremberg: The Officials Who Should Stand Trial for Post 9/11 War Crimes, comes out from Hot Books in March 2016. 16:26 minutes (7.52 MB)

Captalism and Sustainability, the Elephant in the Room

program date: 
Mon, 11/02/2015


Tom Becker reads excerpts from an article by Garry Leech entitled The Elephant in the Room: Capitalism and Sustainable Development 7:28 minutes (3.42 MB)

The Left and the Law on Prison Reform

Categories:
program date: 
Mon, 11/02/2015

The Left and the Law with Mike Snedeker and Jan Haaken talk about the growing movement for prison reform--and why conservatives are joining progressives in calling for an end to mass incarceration, long sentences, and the extensive use of solitary confinement. Jan and Mike talk about some of the challenges in separating the rhetoric from the real reforms, and some of the dilemmas for activists around prison politics.

They mention
http://www.cut50.org/
and
https://www.themarshallproject.org/

[image from wikipedia]

12:33 minutes (5.75 MB)

Sanders, Socialism, and Skeptics

Categories:
program date: 
Mon, 11/02/2015

Denise Morris and Bill Resnick explore the Bernie Sanders phenomena and question the conclusions drawn by Emma Caterine in her Truthout.org op ed "Is Bernie Sanders Dangerous to Socialism?"

[image from wikipedia]
12:05 minutes (5.53 MB)

Brian Tokar on Climate beyond Paris

program date: 
Mon, 12/07/2015

Bill Resnick talks with Brian Tokar about this week's Paris climate change talks, which are headed toward an international agreement designed to allow fossil fuel companies to continue to profit, even though the tax discounts they get could be used for helping climate victims and transitioning to sustainable sources of energy. The Mole discusses the next steps for the climate action movements to save the planet.

14:25 minutes (6.6 MB)

Borders of Religion and Politics

program date: 
Mon, 12/07/2015

Jan Haaken talks with Maxine Fookson and Helena Lee about their recent trip as part of a Social Justice delegation, organized by the Unitarian Universalist church in Portland, traveling to the US/Mexico border. They also talk about religion, politics, and the recent attack in San Bernadino. 

[image from wikimedia]

11:04 minutes (5.07 MB)

Book Mole: The Signature of All Things

program date: 
Mon, 12/07/2015

Book Mole Larry Bowlden reviews Elizabeth Gilbert’s The Signature of All Things and finds it is a compendious study of the history of botany and of pharmaceuticals; it is also a wonderfully written story of a brave woman scientist on the verge of grasping the mechanism that drives evolution via her study of mosses. 4:11 minutes (1.92 MB)

Charlie Brown Xmas Politics

program date: 
Mon, 12/21/2015

Joe Clement and special guest Dennis Gravy review the classic Christmas-time cartoon, A Charlie Brown Christmas. They consider anti-commercialism, alienation, cultural appropriation, white supremacy, and why the "workers revolution" that seems to promise an answer to Charlie Brown's problems falls flat. Dennis Gravy is a member of the Industrial Workers of the World and the Marilyn Buck Abolitionist Collective.

Image from "Free clipart"

14:05 minutes (6.45 MB)

Climate Impacts of the TPP

program date: 
Mon, 12/21/2015

Desiree Hellegers hosts a round table discussion on the climate impacts of the Transpacific Partnership, featuring Miya Reback, development and campaign coordinator for 350.org Portland, Kristen Sheeran, Oregon Director for Climate Solutions, and Michael Shannon, Executive Director, Oregon Fair Trade Campaign.  They also recommend the work of Renew Oregon.


image via 350.org
16:48 minutes (7.69 MB)

Kathleen Gerson on the Unfinished Women's Movement

program date: 
Mon, 12/21/2015

Bill Resnick interviews Kathleen Gerson. Gerson teaches at NYU in the Department of Sociology, and is the author of The Unfinished Revolution: Coming of Age in a New Era of Gender, Work and Family. They discuss the revolution in US life triggered by the women’s movement.

19:18 minutes (8.83 MB)

Resnick, Houck, and Lovell on Portland Climate Action Plan, Part One

program date: 
Mon, 12/28/2015


Bill Resnick interviews Mike Houck and Kaitlin Lovell about Portland's latest Climate Action Plan. Mike Houck has been a member of the Planning and Sustainability Commission, and is director of the Urban Greenspaces Institute. Kaitlin Lovell is Manager of the Science, Fish and Wildlife Division for the City of Portland's Bureau of Environmental Services. This is the first of a two-part conversation.

[image via wikimedia] 18:59 minutes (8.7 MB)

For an Economy of Generosity

program date: 
Mon, 12/28/2015

Clayton Morgareidge discusses moving from an economy of parsimony to an economy of generosity.

[image via wikimedia] 7:41 minutes (3.52 MB)

Portland Needs a Rent Strike

program date: 
Mon, 12/28/2015


Joe Clement reads an opinion piece from December 23rd's Portland Observer  by Lew Church of Tenant Rights Project and Portland Tenants United, that suggests a city-wide rent strike is worth considering.

[image from wikipedia]

3:42 minutes (1.7 MB)

Mass Shootings and Insanity Pleas

program date: 
Mon, 12/28/2015

Frann Michel talks with Jan Haaken, director of the documentary Guilty Except for Insanity,  about questions around competency and the insanity plea in the Robert Lewis Dear case, the shooting that left three dead at the Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado Springs in November. Jan comments on the history of the political use of the insanity plea as well as the role of madness--both individual and collective--in prosecution of mass killings.
10:16 minutes (4.71 MB)

China's Eco Apocalypse

program date: 
Mon, 01/11/2016

19:33 minutes (8.96 MB)

Portland Anti-war Activism

program date: 
Mon, 01/11/2016

Desiree Hellegers interviews John Linder on the history of Portland anti-war activism since the first Gulf War.

Desiree mentions the Rally and March w/ Portland Peace and Justice Works Iraq Affinity Group and Portland Peaceful Response Coalition on Friday, January 15, 2016, 4:30-6:00 PM at Pioneer Courthouse Square, SW Yamhill and Broadway, to demand an End to 25 Years of Killing: US Out of Iraq.
14:51 minutes (6.8 MB)

Occupy Malheur Psychology

program date: 
Mon, 01/11/2016

Jan Haaken and Tod Sloan discuss the occupation at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. They consider the largely progressive history of occupation, often as a response to exhaustion of other attempts at redress, and usually entailing personal risk, as in occupations of segregated lunch counters, or the 1973 occupation of Wounded Knee by American Indian Movement activists. They note the potential overlap in outlook or rhetoric between some left and right perspectives on the value of the local, but that the underlying issues in the Malheur case have to do with narrow material interests, often coming down to the desire to privatize public lands. 13:24 minutes (6.14 MB)

 

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