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Voices from the Edge

About the program …

Community dialogue is important. At 8am every Thursday Voices from the Edge lends a KBOO microphone to informed guests you might not hear anywhere else. With an hour to invest, the call-in format engages listeners in meaningful conversations about crucial issues like racial disparity, government accountability, environmental justice and politics on local, state and national levels. Join lively discussions about concerns that are important to you and our community. Together we’ll make Oregon and our nation a better place for a larger number of those living here.

About the host

Jo Ann Hardesty is Principal Partner at Consult Hardesty. She serves as a subject matter expert on a myriad of issues and is available as a speaker, facilitator and campaign planner. A long-time voice for Portland's under-represented communities and a leader in the struggle against racial and economic injustice, Jo Ann was three times elected to the Oregon legislature and for many years Executive Director of Oregon Action. She’s been called on by the City of Portland to help re-write the City Charter and organizes those on the downside of power to pursue their interests from the local to the federal level. She is particularly committed to leadership development and in holding those in power accountable.

Join the conversation …

Join the conversation every Thursday morning from 8-9 a.m. by calling 503-231-8187. Keep the conversation going after the program at our blog at kboo.fm/voicesfromtheedge.

Engineering: Steve Nassar 

Coming Soon

Investigative Reporter Greg Palast Returns
 

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Episode Archive

Voices from the Edge on 03/28/13

Air date: 
Thu, 03/28/2013 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Interview with S. Brian Wilson author Blood on the Tracks

"We are not worth more. They are not less" This is the mantra of S. Brian Wilson and the theme that runs throughout his compelling psychohistorical memoir. Wilson's story begins in small-town, rural America, where he grew up as a "Commie-hating,baseball-loving Baptist." moves though life-changing experiences in Viet Nam, Nicaragua, and elsewhere, and culminates with his commitment to a localized, sustainable lifestyle.

Voices from the Edge on 03/21/13

Air date: 
Thu, 03/21/2013 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
A conversation with Greg Palast.

Join Greg Palast and i on Thursday March 21 @ 8:30AM as we discuss the death of Hugo Chavez and the rebuilding of the Republican Party. This is the kick-off of our Spring membership drive! It is always a pleasure to kick-off the drive with Greg's insightful conversations and fun thank you gifts. 

About Greg Palast

Greg Palast is the author of Billionaires and Ballot Bandits, Vultures' Picnic and the New York Times bestsellers, Armed Madhouse and The Best Democracy Money Can Buy. 

Voices from the Edge on 03/14/13

Categories:
Air date: 
Thu, 03/14/2013 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Restorative justice and domestic violence: an interview with Dr. Carrie Banks

This week on Voices from the Edge, Dave Mazza talks with Dr. Carrie Banks of the Domestic Violence Safe Dialogue. The program, drawing on restorative justice methods, facilitates conversations between survivors and offenders who have never met before in an effort to help both parties foster transformative changes inside themselves and others. Can these encounters heal wounds and provide offenders a way to begin offering restitution to the communty they've harmed? Join un this Thursday at 8 am.

Voices from the Edge on 03/07/13

Air date: 
Thu, 03/07/2013 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Interview with Paul Gorski on White Privilege & Racism

Paul Gorski will provide a keynote address at the 14th Annual White Privilege Conference in Seattle, Wa from April 10th-14th 2013. What is white privilege? Why a white privilege conference? Join Paul and I for a lively conversation regarding race, privilege and antiracism efforts currently underway on Thursday, March 7, 2013 from 8:00AM-9:00AM on Voices from the Edge! Paul C. Gorski is an assistant professor in New Century College, George Mason University. Gorski’s work and passion is social justice activism. His areas of scholarly focus include anti-poverty activism and education, critical race theory and anti-racism education, and critical theories pertaining to women’s rights, LGBT rights, labor rights, immigrant rights, and anti-imperialism.

Voices from the Edge on 02/28/13

Air date: 
Thu, 02/28/2013 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
The Innocence Project w/Mr. Melendez & Mr. Wilhoit

Exonerated Death Row Inmates Visit Oregon University Campuses After serving 18 years on Florida’s death row, Juan Melendez walked out and into a very different world. Unable to read or write English when he went in, now Melendez will address universities. He will joined Greg Wilhoit, who served time on Oklahoma’s death row, and was also exonerated as an innocent man. Wilhoit is featured in the best-selling non-fiction book by John Grisham, The Innocent Man. The tour is sponsored by Oregonians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty (OADP) and Witness to Innocence, a nation-wide organization of exonerated death row inmates who travel the country to talk about the mistakes and injustices that too frequently happen in the American judicial system when the death penalty is involved.

Voices from the Edge on 02/21/13

Categories:
Air date: 
Thu, 02/21/2013 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Interview with Aaron Dixon, Co-Founder, Seattle Chapter of the Black Panthers

Join me on Thursday, February 21, as I speak with Aaron Dixon, the co-founder of the Seattle chapter of the Black Panther Party.  In 1968, the Seattle chapter earned the distinction of being the first chapter of the Black Panther Party founded outside of the state of California, and Aaron was just 19-years old at the time. Aaron's memoir, My People Are Rising: Memoir of a Black Panther Party Captain, chronicles the courage and unforgettable legacy of a generation’s struggle for justice and social change.

Voices from the Edge on 02/07/13

Categories:
Air date: 
Thu, 02/07/2013 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Interview with Kayse Jama, Exec. Dir, Center for Intercultural Organizing

 September 11 forever changed the conversation regarding immigration in the United States. Founded by Portland-area immigrants and refugees, the Center for Intercultural Organizing was originally established to combat widespread anti-Muslim sentiment. The Center’s founders organized a multicultural march and protest outside the federal building in downtown Portland in 2002 that was widely attended by local Muslims and other activists.

Voices from the Edge on 01/31/13

Categories:
Air date: 
Thu, 01/31/2013 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Health Care for All Oregon HR 3510

Should Health Care be a Human Right? Didn't we already win health care reform?  How will this impact your current insurance?

Join me as I speak with representatives of Health Care for All Oregon members  Peter Shapiro, Chair, Portland Jobs with Justice Healthcare Committee and Robin Cash, Portland Jobs with Justice Healthcare Committee on Thursday morning Jan 31, 2013 @ 8AM. We will discuss preparations for a massive rally schedule for the State Capitol in Salem on February 4, 2013. 

 

This event is being organized by Health Care for All Oregon, a statewide organization with about 60 member organizations. Portland Jobs with Justice is organizing the Portland area contingent.

Audio

A call to fill Oregon's black leadership void

program date: 
Thu, 08/27/2009

Black leadership is on the rise - from the White House to corporate giants like Xerox Corp. In progressive Oregon, however, blacks currently hold no elected positions in the city, county or regional governments within the metropolitan area where most of their community resides. These political disparities are more than matched by economic, social, health and education disparities that have left black Oregonians impoverished.

Charles McGee and Johnell Bell, co-founders of the Black Parent Initiative, believe the time has come for this to change. In a recent essay in the Oregonian, McGee and Bell called "for Oregon to have a different conversation, followed by bold policy changes and courageous action...being well-meaning or well intentioned is no longer enough." Jo Ann and Dave talk with McGee and Bell about their call to action and the role of all Oregonians in ending racial disparities within our state.

Coming up in September! On September 3, Jo Ann and Dave talk with organizers of the effort to recall Mayor Sam Adams. On September 10, Dave and Jo Ann will talk with exonerated death row inmate Curtis McCarty about his experiences and Exonerated, the documentary about his ordeal.

The conversation doesn't end when the program does. You can join in additional discussion of the week's issue on our blog at kboo.fm/voicesfromtheedge (click on the "blog" tab). You'll find additional information, important links, comments from other listeners and commentary from Jo Ann and Dave. Have a question for our guests, but can't call in during the program? Post your questions on line so we can make them a part of the Voices discussion.

Clearing the air in Portland schools

program date: 
Wed, 08/19/2009

Portland may be a green city, but some of its school children are breathing air more like the polluted skies of Cleveland. A  USA Today study found six of our city's schools in northwest and north/northeast Portland among the worst in the nation for exposing children to airborn toxins. Benzine, a carcinogen found in gasoline, exceeds DEQ safety standards by 26 percent. Frustrated with lack of action by state regulators, parents of children in some of the mot impacted schools are organizing the community. Neighbor for Clean Air wants industrial users in the area like ESCO to install better air filtration systems and DEQ to provide more extensive monitoring (DEQ is currently monitoring only one school - Harriet Tubman Leadership Academy for the next 60 days).

Jo Ann and Dave talk with Mary Peveto of Neighbors for Clean Air about their petition drive and other efforts to clear the air in Portland's schools. Also joining the conversation is Geri Williams, founder of the Environmental Justice Action group and longtime community activist working on air quality issues in North and Northeast Portland.

The conversation doesn't end when the program does. You can join in additional discussion of the week's issue on our blog at kboo.fm/voicesfromtheedge (click on the "blog" tab). You'll find additional information, important links, comments from other listeners and commentary from Jo Ann and Dave. Have a question for our guests, but can't call in during the program? Post your questions on line so we can make them a part of the Voices discussion.

Ending racial profiling in Portland: A discussion with Dave Hardesty

program date: 
Thu, 08/13/2009

The Portland Police Bureau agreed to develop a plan for ending racial profiling within their organization. But despite promises from Police Chief Rosie Sizer, little progress seems to have been made. Community oganizations, meanwhile, are turning up the heat on city hall to implement an action plan now. Jo Ann talks with local activist Dave Hardesty about recent developments in the effort to end racial profiling in the police bureau.

The State of Black Oregon

program date: 
Wed, 08/05/2009

 

 

The State of Black Oregon was published earlier this month by the Urban League of Portland. The report contains a stark inventory of statistics that show a persistent gap in living standards between black and white Oregonians – a gap that is growing wider as a result of the current economic downturn. "During the last eight years, the poverty gap in America and in this state has continued to grow," says Marcus C. Mundy, president and CEO of the Urban League of Portland. Jo Ann and Dave talk with the League's Marcus Mundy and Midge Purcell about the report and how Oregon can close this gap.

Can talking about race make a difference?

program date: 
Wed, 08/05/2009

Last month, President Obama sat down over beers with a Cambridge cop and a Harvard professor to talk about an ugly incident that brought home how deep racial tensions still run in our nation. The president saw the arrest of Henry Louis Gates, Jr. by Sgt. James Crowly as a "teachable moment" that could help Americans in their struggle to understand race and its impacts. But can talking about race make a difference?

In Portland, where gentrification has fueled racial tensions, John Canda and Judith Mowry think talking is essential to get people to confront issues they ignore or pretend don't exist within our community and the nation. For the last two years, the city's Office of Neighborhood Involvement and the Restorative Listening Project has been holding their own versions of President Obama's "beer summit" in North and Northeast Portland, bringing together through the Uniting to Understand Racism program. Can talk reduce racial strife? Does bringing people together to confront difficult issues that go to the heart of how power is or isn't shared make our democracy stronger?

Jo Ann and Dave talk with the Restorative Listening Project's John Canda and the Office of Neighborhood Involvement's Judith Mowry about what we have to gain by talking to each other.

The conversation doesn't end when the program does. You can join in additional discussion of the week's issue on our blog at kboo.fm/voicesfromtheedge (click on the "blog" tab). You'll find additional information, important links, comments from other listeners and commentary from Jo Ann and Dave. Have a question for our guests, but can't call in during the program? Post your questions on line so we can make them a part of the Voices discussion.

How do we change the national conversation about war and peace? Also: Update on health care reform legislation

program date: 
Wed, 07/22/2009

Seven months into a new administration and the nation still finds itself embroiled in two Asian wars. Many Americans would have difficulty explaining how the Obama administration's conduct of these wars differs from the last administration's. They're certainly not being helped by policymakers and pundits who are working overtime to marginalize arguments for American withdrawal from the region. With the economy now people's foremost concern, how does the peace movement change the national conversation about war and peace?

Jo Ann and Dave talk with Tom Hastings, Director of the Oregon Peace Institute's Peace Voice Program. On August 1, the program will host the Peace Voice Conference, bringing together activists, academics and others to explore new ways to bring together diverse communities in order to refocus the public discourse on the possibilities of peace and the inadvisibility of war.

Also this Thursday: Jo Ann and Dave talk with Betsy Dillard, Director of Health Care for America Now, about the current status of health care reform bills currently making their way through Congress.

The conversation doesn't end when the program does. You can join in additional discussion of the week's issue on our blog at kboo.fm/voicesfromtheedge (click on the "blog" tab). You'll find additional information, important links, comments from other listeners and commentary from Jo Ann and Dave. Have a question for our guests, but can't call in during the program?

What's the future of community media?

program date: 
Wed, 07/15/2009

As recent events in Iran have shown, technology has given ordinary people the power to inform neighbors down the street and strangers halfway around the world about important events regardless of government censorship or corporate media indifference. "Community media" - citizen-operated print, broadcast and digital technologies - is filling the information needs of a growing number of Americans. The Alliance for Community Media's 2009 international conference recently took place in Portland, where hundreds of media activists discussed new concepts in community media and challenge old ones. Is community media reaching and reflecting the community? Are there lessons to be learned from the professional media? What is the future of community media?

Jo Ann and Dave talk with Erik Mollberg , chair of the Indiana Chapter of the Alliance for Community Media, and director of Ft Wayne's Public, Educational and Governmental television services. Mollberg, one of the organizers of the conference, lobbies and writes extensively for greater realization of public access to media. Also joining the conversation is Phil Busse, founder of the Northwest Institute for Social Change, and two participants in the institutes's summer media camp, a program for learning how to use art and media to create social change.

 The conversation doesn't end when the program does. You can join in additional discussion of the week's issue on our blog at kboo.fm/voicesfromtheedge (click on the "blog" tab). You'll find additional information, important links, comments from other listeners and commentary from Jo Ann and Dave. Have a question for our guests, but can't call in during the program? Post your questions on line so we can make them a part of the Voices discussion.

Is health care reform in critical condition?

program date: 
Wed, 07/08/2009

Over 75 percent of Americans want health care reform according to a new Pew Research poll. President Obama remains committed to reforming our health care system this year. But as Congress struggles to craft legislation, the voice of concerned voters is getting drowned out by a vocal minority working from the same play book. Will serious health care reform die on the operating table at the hands of congressional Republicans, conservative pundits, and industry spin doctors?

Dave speaks with local health care reform advocates about what progress is being made to overhaul the nation's health care system. How will budget concerns be addressed? Will a public option survive Republican opposition? Is single-payer dead? How will federal reforms fit with recent actions by the Oregon legislature? Joining in the conversation will be Oregon Center for Public Policy's health care advocate, Janet Bauer, and Oregon Health Action Campaign's Director of Community Engagement, Onofre Contreras.

The conversation doesn't end when the program does. You can join in additional discussion of the week's issue on our blog at kboo.fm/voicesfromtheedge (click on the "blog" tab). You'll find additional information, important links, comments from other listeners and commentary from Jo Ann and Dave. Have a question for our guests, but can't call in during the program? Post your questions on line so we can make them a part of the Voices discussion.

Does reorganizing Portland's high schools make sense?

program date: 
Wed, 07/01/2009

Portland's high school dropout rate is the highest in the metropolitan area. While the statewide rate declined last year, Portland high school students are dropping out at twice the rate - 8.2 percent - of students in other Oregon communities. The city's high schools are also grappling with other issues: a growing number of students opting for GED credentials, budget shortfalls, and demands from parents for greater accountability to the community.

Portland Public School Superintendent Carole Smith has launched a major reorganization of the high school system to address these and other issues. The plan calls for closing some high schools, restructuring others, creating more magnet schools and restricting the ability of students to attend schools outside the district in which they reside. Can the reorganization address the problems facing Portland's high schools? Is it still viable in today's economic environment? How will it affect communities that feel they've been short-changed by the school system in the past?

 Jo Ann and Dave talk with Sarah Singer, project manager of the Portland Public School District's high school redesign team and Sarah Carlin Ames, communications coordinator with the team about their plan, its goals and whether it will meet the needs of all Portland students in the coming years.

Jo Ann and Dave also talk with David Fidanque, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Oregon about the recent Supreme Court rulings on affirmative action and on strip searches of school students.

 The conversation doesn't end when the program does. You can join in additional discussion of the week's issue on our blog at kboo.fm/voicesfromtheedge (click on the "blog" tab). You'll find additional information, important links, comments from other listeners and commentary from Jo Ann and Dave. Have a question for our guests, but can't call in during the program? Post your questions on line so we can make them a part of the Voices discussion.

 

Voices from the Edge 06/25/2009

program date: 
Wed, 06/24/2009
Hosted by: Dave Mazza, joannb
Closing Portland's affordable housing gap: a talk with Portland Community Land Trust

The real estate bubble may have burst but many Portlanders still find homeownership beyond their reach. Even with today's lower housing costs, affordable housing for a family earning the median family income ($66,900) would be priced at $200,000 - a price limited to very few homes currently available, and even fewer at that price with the space available for a family of four. For low income families earning less than 60 percent of the median family income, the opportunities are nearly non-existent. Is it important to make home ownership available? How do we close the affordable housing gap in Portland?

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