Environment

The Abe and Joe Talk Radio Show on 10/27/09

Air date: 
Tue, 10/27/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Abe and Joe discuss President Obama's inexplicable reluctance to abandon Bush-era detention and surv

 

Book Review: Timothy Egan and The Big Burn

program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Mon, 10/26/2009

Host Ed Goldberg interviews writer and journalist Timothy Egan about his most recent book, "The Big Burn," a true tale of the massive forest fire that changed America.

27:08 minutes (24.85 MB)

Radiozine on 10/26/09

Categories:
Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Mon, 10/26/2009 - 11:30am - 12:00pm

Host Ed Goldberg interviews writer and journalist Timothy Egan about his most recent book, "The Big Burn," a true tale of the massive forest fire that changed America.

Oregon's Use of Coal Devastating to Powder River Basin Rancher

Categories:
program date: 
Wed, 10/21/2009

Kathleen Stephenson's guests include LJ Turner, a rancher whose livelihood, for more than 40 years, has been threatened by the water depletion and strip mining that result from coal extraction.    Also present,  Robin Everett, an organizer with the Sierra Club's Move Beyond Coal Campaign.

23:44 minutes (10.87 MB)

Locus Focus on 10/26/09

Categories:
Program: 
Locus Focus
Air date: 
Mon, 10/26/2009 - 10:00am - 11:00am
Short Description: 
A closer look at Portland's Urban Growth Boundary

PORTLAND'S URBAN GROWTH BOUNDARY: THIRTY YEARS LATER

In the late 1970s, an imaginary line was drawn around the Portland area. Inside the line, urban development could flourish. Outside that line the farms and forestland that characterize western Oregon would remain intact. This line, called the urban growth boundary, has saved much of the natural landscape that surrounds the city. But in the thirty years since the UGB was first drawn, it has expanded more than once. Now a lot of people in the region are saying it doesn't need to grow anymore.
 

Voices from the Edge on 10/22/09

Air date: 
Thu, 10/22/2009 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Why is 350 an important number? A discussion on climate change.

 

 

This Saturday, Portlanders will be gathering in Pioneer Courthouse Square to convince other Oregonians that 350 is a very important number. That's the maximum safe level of parts per million of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The 350 movement, initiated by author-activist Bill McKibbon, is having actions in over 140 nations this Saturday to pressure governments to take serious action to curb climate change. In the United States, the call to action comes as the U.S.

Karen Coulter: Logging in Deschutes Forest near Bend

Categories:
program date: 
Wed, 10/21/2009

KBOO's Jenka Soderberg speaks with Karen Coulter of the Blue Mountains Biodiversity Project, discussing a proposed logging plan in the Pringle Falls Experimental Forest, southwest of Bend in Central Oregon.  The Forest Service says this land must be logged because of the pine bark beetle, despite there being no evidence of an infestation.  Karen talks about how the government applies a one-size fits all approach to managing pine bark beetle infestations – that is, once a forest reaches a certain density, the government requires thinning of that forest – regardless of whether there is actual evidence of a beetle infestation, and disregarding other factors that impact a forest’s health.

 

24:30 minutes (22.44 MB)

Political Perspectives on 10/21/09

Categories:
Air date: 
Wed, 10/21/2009 - 9:00am - 10:00am

Guests include LJ Turner, a rancher whose livelihood, for more than 40 years, has been threatened by coal mining. He will be speaking at Pioneer Square at noon as part of a rally to help end the use of coal in Oregon. And Jenka Soderberg speaks with Karen Coulter of the Blue Mountains Diversity Project about the movement to save the forest from logging in the Pringle Falls area in Central Oregon.
 

Friends of Family Farmers

Categories:
program: 
Locus Focus
program date: 
Mon, 10/19/2009
Eating locally has become a national movement. But how can we eat locally produced food if our nearby family farms are plowed under for subdivisions?

Eating locally has become a national movement. But how can we eat locally produced food if our nearby family farms are plowed under for subdivisions?

42:23 minutes (38.81 MB)

Senate Climate Change Bill-Final

Categories:
program: 
Evening News
program date: 
Thu, 10/08/2009

 

4:41 minutes (2.14 MB)
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