Special Programming: Public Affairs

Episode Archive

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 07/19/13

Air date: 
Fri, 07/19/2013 - 4:00pm - 8:00pm
Short Description: 
One-day Flash Drive Fundraiser: Part Three - South America

Brazil’s Landless Workers MovementAt 4 pm we shift gears again and move westward to South America. We'll begin with an interview with Eduardo Galeano, author of Open Veins of Latin America: Five Centuries of the Pillage of a Continent, which set a new standard for historical scholarship of Latin America by organizing the various facets of Latin American history according to the patterns of five centuries of exploitation. We'll hear about the struggle against dams in Chile, how climate change is impacting Amazonia, and then focus on land rights and people's movements, including the current Brazilian people's uprising.

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 07/19/13

Air date: 
Fri, 07/19/2013 - 12:00pm - 4:00pm
Short Description: 
One-day Flash Drive Fundraiser: Part two - southern Africa

At Noon, we'll shift focus to sub-equatorial Africa:

12:00 - interview with Map of African land rush.Fred Pearce, author and environmental journalist based in London, about his latest book The Land Grabbers: The New Fight over Who Owns the Earth. Then it's our first musical interlude, featuring a short set from one of the hosts of our Thursday African music program.

1:30 - Kambali Museveli with Friends of the Congo will speak about the student movement in the Democratic Republic of Congo and how people are organizing to end the decades-long conflict that has torn that region apart.

We'll have a set of African music produced by KBOO deejays, then at 3, we're off to Kenya for a look at their Green Belt Movement and then South Africa to check in on labor movements there, as well as the situation regarding Nelson Mandela and his legacy.

 

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 07/19/13

Air date: 
Fri, 07/19/2013 - 8:00am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
One-day Flash Drive Fundraiser: Part One - Oceania/Climate Change


Antarctica mapAt 8am
, we'll begin our tour in Oceania / Australia / Antarctica focusing on topics related to global warming and climate change, including a call from Palmer Station on Antarctica's peninsula (map). We'll air this week's talk by noted environmental activist, author and speaker Bill McKibben of 350.org, as well as an update on gay rights and culture in New Zealand, plus a story about Asian Pacific Islanders.

 8 am - More Talk Radio: hosts Ani and Theresa take on the issue of worldwide climate change from an anarcha-feminist perspective

9 am - Bill McKibben: Summer Heat! How to take decisive, immediate action to confront climate change

10 am - Australian and South Pacific activists speak about the fight against coal terminals and rising sea levels, speaking from ground zero - the part of the world most impacted by climate change

10:40 am - Host Joe Meyer interviews Bob DeValentino, the winter site manager at Palmer Station, located on Anvers Island along the Antarctic Peninsula. Palmer Station, where Bob is spending the winter, is primarily the site of biological research because it is located far enough north (closer to the equator) to have open water much of the year, allowing an abundance of animals.

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 07/18/13

Air date: 
Thu, 07/18/2013 - 5:30pm - 8:00pm
Short Description: 
National Town Hall on Converting our Economy

The Santa Cruz, CA based non-profit, Article V Convention for Our Children’s Future (AVC4OCF), announced, today, the date of their first national, radio/internet town-hall meeting in a planned series of similar events that they are calling their National Campaign for Jobs in America.

 

On July 18, AVC4OCF will co-produce, with radio partners from Oregon to Texas, a collaborative broadcast that will create a national, town-hall forum in which citizens will have the opportunity to listen to experts on the subject of defense (or economic) conversion.  Congressional representatives are also receiving invitations from the non-profit requesting their attendance in this town-hall meeting.

 

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 07/18/13

Air date: 
Thu, 07/18/2013 - 9:00am - 9:30am
Short Description: 
Author & teacher Stuart Perrin interviewed on trafficking women, and what's being done to stop it.

Trafficking women and girls into sexual slavery is a global nightmare.  Over half a million women are sold across international borders, the vast majority of them are sold into sexual slavery.  This happens the world over, and the US is no exception.

Stuart Perrin was working in Nepal when he became acutely aware of this issue.  In response he started The Bahini Foundation, and created a safe place for girls escaping trafficking in Nepal.  

Stuart has re-established The Bahini Foundation in Oregon, and is continuing to find ways to educate the public on the horrors faced by girls sold into sexual exploitation.  He has written the novel Little Sisters based on his work in this area.

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 07/17/13

Categories:
Air date: 
Wed, 07/17/2013 - 7:30pm - 9:00pm
Short Description: 
Bill McKibben live

As the planet lurches past 400 parts per million concentrations of CO2, the moment has come for all of us to do hard, important, powerful things to combat climate change. The last two weeks of July are, statistically, the hottest stretch of the year.  As part the nationally coordinated Summer Heat actions, Bill McKibben, author and co-founder of 350.org, will speak this Wednesday July 17th, in Vancouver, Washington to talk about climate change and the movement to turn it around.  KBOO will broadcast his talk live.

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 07/04/13

Categories:
Air date: 
Thu, 07/04/2013 - 9:00am - 10:00am
Short Description: 
The American Dream and the Chinese Dream

Theresa Mitchell, host of Presswatch, and Per Fagereng, host of Fight the Empire, combine forces to host a special program for July 4th on "The American Dream and the Chinese Dream."

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 06/17/13

Air date: 
Mon, 06/17/2013 - 10:00am - 10:15am
Short Description: 
Local News

Host Per Fagereng interviews Moji Agha about the results of the Iranian elections.

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 05/30/13

Air date: 
Thu, 05/30/2013 - 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Short Description: 
Indigenous Experience NW

LIVE BROADCAST from the Indigenous Experience NW

Community, Family, and Tradition are MEDICINE WITHIN.

Scottish Rite Center

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 05/24/13

Air date: 
Fri, 05/24/2013 - 9:00am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
The Vanport flood and racism in Portland: sixty five years later

Sixty five years ago, the Columbia River flooded into the largest public housing project in the U-S at the time, leaving 18,500 people homeless, a large number of whom were black.  The event changed race relations in Portland forever.

On Friday May 24th, from 8 am to noon, KBOO presented a special program on the Vanport flood and racism in Portland, sixty five years later.

We featured historians and archived audio, as well as a discussion led by PSU professor and activist Walidah Imarisha asking ‘Why are there so few black people in Oregon’.

Listen to the full three hours by clicking the link above, or individual segments below:

Audio

Cascadia Rising: Biocentric Resistance panel, Part 2

program date: 
Mon, 04/28/2014

Biocentric Resistance as Catalyst for Bioregional Resistance

A workshop led by Karen Coulter

mountainAs the global climate crisis and the spreading radiation from the Fukishima nuclear reactor melt-down demonstrate, the destruction that humans cause to the environment now transcends national boundaries and cannot be repaired with technological solutions or societal value systems that continue to prioritize human desires above ecological limits. For bioregionalism to work in creating a viable future, it is necessary to have a biocentric value system, in which the well-being and flourishing of non-human life has value in itself, independent of the usefulness of the non-human world for human purposes. The richness and diversity of life forms are valuable in themselves.

The philosophy of Deep Ecology posits that humans have no right to reduce the richness and diversity of ecosystems except to satisfy vital human needs. Present human interference with the non-human world is excessive and is rapidly worsening. Policies that need to be changed affect basic economic, technological, and ideological structures. Deep ecologists believe that those who subscribe to these ideas have an obligation to try to implement the necessary changes.

This workshop on Biocentrism and Deep Ecology explains these concepts, explores what changes would need to be made, and examines activist struggles and movements within Cascadia that have pursued these goals.

BIO: Karen Coulter has been part of the Earth First! movement since 1984 and an activist since 1980. She is a naturalist who has spent the last 23 years as co-founder and director of Blue Mountains Biodiversity Project getting to know the forest ecosystems and wildlife of eastern Oregon. She has spent most of every summer in the forests field-surveying thousands of acres of proposed timber sales to protect biodiversity and ecological integrity. She has also been a principal activist with the Program on Corporations, Law, and Democracy; a Board member of the Fund for Wild Nature; and a campaigner for Greenpeace International. She currently volunteers withPortland Rising Tide and works with Blue Mountains Biodiversity Project. She has given workshops on Biocentrism and Deep Ecology at an Earth First! Organizers Conference in Florida and at an Earth First! regional rendezvous in Oregon.

 

Cascadia Rising: Biocentric Resistance panel, Part 1

program date: 
Mon, 04/28/2014
 

Biocentric Resistance as Catalyst for Bioregional Resistance

A workshop led by Karen Coulter

mountainAs the global climate crisis and the spreading radiation from the Fukishima nuclear reactor melt-down demonstrate, the destruction that humans cause to the environment now transcends national boundaries and cannot be repaired with technological solutions or societal value systems that continue to prioritize human desires above ecological limits. For bioregionalism to work in creating a viable future, it is necessary to have a biocentric value system, in which the well-being and flourishing of non-human life has value in itself, independent of the usefulness of the non-human world for human purposes. The richness and diversity of life forms are valuable in themselves.

The philosophy of Deep Ecology posits that humans have no right to reduce the richness and diversity of ecosystems except to satisfy vital human needs. Present human interference with the non-human world is excessive and is rapidly worsening. Policies that need to be changed affect basic economic, technological, and ideological structures. Deep ecologists believe that those who subscribe to these ideas have an obligation to try to implement the necessary changes.

This workshop on Biocentrism and Deep Ecology explains these concepts, explores what changes would need to be made, and examines activist struggles and movements within Cascadia that have pursued these goals.

BIO: Karen Coulter has been part of the Earth First! movement since 1984 and an activist since 1980. She is a naturalist who has spent the last 23 years as co-founder and director of Blue Mountains Biodiversity Project getting to know the forest ecosystems and wildlife of eastern Oregon. She has spent most of every summer in the forests field-surveying thousands of acres of proposed timber sales to protect biodiversity and ecological integrity. She has also been a principal activist with the Program on Corporations, Law, and Democracy; a Board member of the Fund for Wild Nature; and a campaigner for Greenpeace International. She currently volunteers withPortland Rising Tide and works with Blue Mountains Biodiversity Project. She has given workshops on Biocentrism and Deep Ecology at an Earth First! Organizers Conference in Florida and at an Earth First! regional rendezvous in Oregon.

  • Length: 46:00 minutes (42.12 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Cascadia Rising: "Appropriate Appropriation" panel, Part 2

program date: 
Mon, 04/28/2014

Appropriate Appropriation and Ancestral Technology

A Panel with Peter Bauer and Eric Bernardo

glassknapping2-300x200There is growing interest in using ancestral technology as a mechanism for living more sustainably, connecting with ancestral heritage, and providing for yourself with things from nature, or the simple enjoyment of crafting with your hands. While all humans have used various forms of these technologies, there is often friction between Native Americans and non-natives in the United States. This friction stems from the misappropriation of these technologies by non-natives, the privileged position non-native people have of being able to do these things at all (i.e. financial access to schools and gatherings), and a general lack of knowledge of traditional “prehistoric” European traditions among both Native Americans and non-natives. There will never be one right way to practice ancestral technology in a way that appeases everyone’s sensibilities. However, we must spark this discussion on a larger scale to increase the number of people working together and to reach a deeper understanding between different cultures in order to have mutual respect. This panel discussion is a step in that direction.

Questions to be discussed:

  • Where is the line between reclaiming your own ancestral heritage and culturally appropriating from Natives?
  • Is there a way to appropriately appropriate? What technologies have been shared by all human cultures?
  • How does entitlement fit into this discussion?
  • How does privilege fit into this discussion?
  • How do we go about creating alliances and allies between Native Americans and non-natives in using ancestral technologies?

BIOS: Eric Bernardo is a member of the Watlala Band of Chinuk of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. He received my Masters Degree in Education in 2009 from the University of Oregon and a Bachelors of Arts: History from PSU back in 2008. Go Blazers! He is currently teaching his tribe’s indigenous language at their office in Portland and at a community centre in Eugene.

Peter Bauer (formerly writing under the moniker “Urban Scout”) is a multi-disciplinary artist and environmental educator. During his time as urban scout he received local press in the The Oregonian, Portland Mercury, Willamette Week, national press in ReadyMade Magazine and international press in Positive Living Magazine (UK) and Chain Reaction (AU) for his efforts to create and promote the culture of rewilding. He loves basketry, playing the banjo, and is a fluent speaker of Chinuk Wawa (Chinook Jargon), the Native trade language of the Pacific Northwest. During the summer of 2012 he attended Lynx Vilden’s Stone Age immersion program. Bauer has been an environmental educator for over a decade, working with local organizations like Cascadia Wild, Friends of Tryon Creek, Audubon Society, Portland Waldorf, Shining Star Waldorf, Cleveland High School, and is the executive director at Rewild Portland, a non-profit that he founded. Aside from running Rewild Portland, he currently works at Shining Star Waldorf School in Portland as an instructor for their Nature Immersion Program.



  • Length: 40:04 minutes (36.69 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Cascadia Rising:"Appropriate Appropriation" panel, Part 1

program date: 
Mon, 04/28/2014

Appropriate Appropriation and Ancestral Technology

A Panel with Peter Bauer and Eric Bernardo

glassknapping2-300x200There is growing interest in using ancestral technology as a mechanism for living more sustainably, connecting with ancestral heritage, and providing for yourself with things from nature, or the simple enjoyment of crafting with your hands. While all humans have used various forms of these technologies, there is often friction between Native Americans and non-natives in the United States. This friction stems from the misappropriation of these technologies by non-natives, the privileged position non-native people have of being able to do these things at all (i.e. financial access to schools and gatherings), and a general lack of knowledge of traditional “prehistoric” European traditions among both Native Americans and non-natives. There will never be one right way to practice ancestral technology in a way that appeases everyone’s sensibilities. However, we must spark this discussion on a larger scale to increase the number of people working together and to reach a deeper understanding between different cultures in order to have mutual respect. This panel discussion is a step in that direction.

Questions to be discussed:

  • Where is the line between reclaiming your own ancestral heritage and culturally appropriating from Natives?
  • Is there a way to appropriately appropriate? What technologies have been shared by all human cultures?
  • How does entitlement fit into this discussion?
  • How does privilege fit into this discussion?
  • How do we go about creating alliances and allies between Native Americans and non-natives in using ancestral technologies?

BIOS: Eric Bernardo is a member of the Watlala Band of Chinuk of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. He received my Masters Degree in Education in 2009 from the University of Oregon and a Bachelors of Arts: History from PSU back in 2008. Go Blazers! He is currently teaching his tribe’s indigenous language at their office in Portland and at a community centre in Eugene.

Peter Bauer (formerly writing under the moniker “Urban Scout”) is a multi-disciplinary artist and environmental educator. During his time as urban scout he received local press in the The Oregonian, Portland Mercury, Willamette Week, national press in ReadyMade Magazine and international press in Positive Living Magazine (UK) and Chain Reaction (AU) for his efforts to create and promote the culture of rewilding. He loves basketry, playing the banjo, and is a fluent speaker of Chinuk Wawa (Chinook Jargon), the Native trade language of the Pacific Northwest. During the summer of 2012 he attended Lynx Vilden’s Stone Age immersion program. Bauer has been an environmental educator for over a decade, working with local organizations like Cascadia Wild, Friends of Tryon Creek, Audubon Society, Portland Waldorf, Shining Star Waldorf, Cleveland High School, and is the executive director at Rewild Portland, a non-profit that he founded. Aside from running Rewild Portland, he currently works at Shining Star Waldorf School in Portland as an instructor for their Nature Immersion Program.



  • Length: 44:49 minutes (41.03 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Cascadia Rising: Calling Ourselves Home, led by Rain Crowe

program date: 
Sun, 04/27/2014
 

Calling Ourselves Home: Feeling the Path of Right Relationship

A workshop led by Rain Crowe

callinourselveshomeFeeling for the Path of Right Relationship

To those of us of Indo-European descent, living here on unceded indigenous lands, I offer this inquiry and framing, that we might together find a courage to face, what we must, for the sake of the imperiled web of life.

What is “whiteness” and how do we accountably reckon with the privileges of settler colonialism as we endeavor to cultivate a sacred relationship to lands that are not our biological and cultural forebears’?

How do we recognize the patterns of conquest, slavery, entitlement, and estrangement in our lives and work to intervene in replicating them?

What are the relationships between grief, shame, vulnerability, and action, in the context of decolonizing ourselves?

How do we continue to simultaneously compost the culture of Empire and regenerate non-appropriated Earth cultures?

What are some approaches to collectively healing inter-generational trauma and cross-cultural trauma?

Note: in this forum, we’ll endeavor upon a meandering process of a journey, not a high speed arrival at a predetermined destination. I’ll be presenting some of my own explorations and beliefs (not answers) about these questions, and we’ll have space for arising reflections and inquiries amongst the group. This time is meant to demonstrate a template for discussion and to inspire the participants to carry on with these questions and more outside of this forum. We are working with a finite amount of time, and to the best of my ability I’ll ensure that we have a healthy closure to our time together.

BIO: rain crowe is the founder of Calling Ourselves Home, a body of work dedicated to cultivating the arts of interdependent relationships through group facilitation, mediation, and educational opportunities. She is a regenerative culture events organizer who works with spiritual, political, rewilding, and intentional communities all over the country. She teaches and writes about magic and ritual, the ancestral skills of council making and restorative conflict transformation, systems thinking in radical organizing, and ecstatic connection to the sacred. callingourselveshome.weebly.com

Cascadia Rising: Emergency Preparedness, Community Resilience and Sustainability

program date: 
Sun, 04/27/2014

Emergency Preparedness, Community Resilience & Sustainability: Same Idea, Different Timescales

A panel featuring Jeremy O’Leary, Charla Chamberlain and Leif Brecke, 11 AM, Room 236

tool-box-iconJeremy O’Leary will be speaking from his experience working with federal, state, and local programs that are meant to help communities prepare for disasters. As a permaculturalist, his methods for disaster preparedness integrate general community resilience and not solely emergency preparedness, or what he calls, “the long emergency”. Charla Chamberlain will speak to her experience having been a community organizer with City Repair in Portland for over a decade. She will discuss the successes and challenges she found in getting neighbors to work together towards common goals. Leif will be discussing how the formation of a Cascadia Resilience Network is taking place the direction he envisions it going.

BIOS: If there is an organization in Portland that has to do with livability and sustainability issues, chances are Jeremy O’Leary is involved with it to some degree. With prior experiences with the city’s Peak Oil Task Force, along withTransition PDX, overseeing TheDirt.orgPortland Permaculture Guild, participating with the City’s Local Energy Assurance Plan (LEAP), and also the FooDiversity group that looks at food and garden issues in East Portland. Jeremy is also an IT staffer for Multnomah County, for which he served on the steering committee for the Multnomah Food Initiative.

Charla Chamberlain grew up in the suburbs of Seattle, Washington as a mixed race woman in a primarily white population in the 1970′s. She was a founding Board member, Co-Director, Intersection Repair Program, T-Horse, Volunteer, and Earth Day Celebration Coordinator with The City Repair Project from 1997-2004. She studied Community Development at Portland State University and is passionate about neighborhoods and cities building collaborative networks of relationship. She is currently the Development Co-Manager, Communications at Sisters Of The Road, a nonprofit cafe building authentic relationships to alleviate the hunger of isolation in Old Town/Chinatown. She enjoys making her own yogurt, kimchi, and shrub, singing in the sunshine of her backyard, and talking to strangers in restaurants.

Leif Brecke is a long time activist and fifth generation Cascadian forest worker. He is a veteran of the bioregion’s forest defense and anti-corporate globalization movements. Leif is the Program Coordinator of the Resilient Communities Project and the Social Systems Facilitator at the Cascadian Resilience Network. A graduate of the University of Oregon with a B.S. in Cultural Anthropology, his research interests are network theory, complex systems, community resilience, and community resistance.

 
  • Length: 70:39 minutes (80.85 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 160Kbps (CBR)

Cascadia Against Empire: Bioregional Organizing from a Decolonizing Perspective (Part 2)

program date: 
Wed, 04/16/2014
2014 Public Interest Environmetal Law Conference panel. Part 2, Q & A/discussion. For panelists, see Part !.
  • Length: 35:25 minutes (81.07 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 320Kbps (CBR)

Cascadia Against Empire: Bioregional Organizing from a Decolonizing Perspective

program date: 
Tue, 04/15/2014
2014 Public Interest Environmental Law Conference panel, with Alexander Reid Ross, Earth First! Journal Collective Member; Paul Roland, KBOO Radio Public Affairs programmer, Earth First!er and member of Cascadia Portland Branch; Casey Corcoran, bioregional and food sovereignty organizer in Bend, OR, co-editor or "Autonomy Cascadia: A Journal of Bioregional Decolonization" and co-producer of "Occupied Cascadia" film; Kayla Godow Tufti, member of Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, activist in Eugene and contributing writer to Eugene Weekly.

Paul Roland talks with Keith Farnish, author of "Underminers," by phone from Scotland

Categories:
program date: 
Fri, 02/14/2014
From the website www.underminers.org:

"Industrial Civilization is likely to be the last great empire humanity will ever see. If it is allowed to continue in its ravenous way then there is no future for humanity, for the natural systems and processes that allow humans to exist on Earth are the very things that Industrial Civilization is destroying. In fact, no form of civilization has ever been sustainable nor ever will be. In order for humanity to continue on Earth then civilization has to stop, and people allowed to return to a way of living that is connected to the real world.

We are not able to do this. At least not until we become Underminers. The industrial system depends, for its survival, on humans being disconnected from the real world and mentally attached to the machine that we fuel with our civilized lives. The Tools of Disconnection keep us in that state, and the only way to prevent us from being responsible for our demise is to undermine those Tools of Disconnection. Once we are free from the grip of the machine and reconnected with the real world then the myth of Industrial Civilization will die, and humanity will be able to continue.

Underminers is the timely follow-up to Time’s Up! An Uncivilized Solution to a Global Crisis. It takes up where that book left off, with a detailed, highly practical approach to the process of undermining in all its many hues. At once entertaining, shocking and inspiring, Underminers draws on the author’s own experience dealing at first hand with the lies of the industrial machine, and that of a wide range of other people who have their own unique take on the swath of topics covered in the book.

From the reasons we are unable to act, to the nitty-gritty of keeping ourselves and others safe during the undermining process, the first half of the book is an invaluable guide to navigating the industrial system and becoming a fully-formed Underminer. The second half details, with surprising openness how the reader can utilize their abilities and new-found determination to be an effective Underminer; whether that be undermining the advertising industry or the political machine, turning symbolic protestors into real activists, building self-determined communities or simply being ourselves – connected, free human beings."

In addition to the underminers.org site, Farnish also hosts www.KeithFarnish.com and www.theearthblog.com.

 

Interview with Keith Farnish by phone from Scotland

Categories:
program date: 
Fri, 02/14/2014
From the website www.underminers.org:

Industrial Civilization is likely to be the last great empire humanity will ever see. If it is allowed to continue in its ravenous way then there is no future for humanity, for the natural systems and processes that allow humans to exist on Earth are the very things that Industrial Civilization is destroying. In fact, no form of civilization has ever been sustainable nor ever will be. In order for humanity to continue on Earth then civilization has to stop, and people allowed to return to a way of living that is connected to the real world.

We are not able to do this. At least not until we become Underminers. The industrial system depends, for its survival, on humans being disconnected from the real world and mentally attached to the machine that we fuel with our civilized lives. The Tools of Disconnection keep us in that state, and the only way to prevent us from being responsible for our demise is to undermine those Tools of Disconnection. Once we are free from the grip of the machine and reconnected with the real world then the myth of Industrial Civilization will die, and humanity will be able to continue.

Underminers is the timely follow-up to Time’s Up! An Uncivilized Solution to a Global Crisis. It takes up where that book left off, with a detailed, highly practical approach to the process of undermining in all its many hues. At once entertaining, shocking and inspiring, Underminers draws on the author’s own experience dealing at first hand with the lies of the industrial machine, and that of a wide range of other people who have their own unique take on the swath of topics covered in the book.

From the reasons we are unable to act, to the nitty-gritty of keeping ourselves and others safe during the undermining process, the first half of the book is an invaluable guide to navigating the industrial system and becoming a fully-formed Underminer. The second half details, with surprising openness how the reader can utilize their abilities and new-found determination to be an effective Underminer; whether that be undermining the advertising industry or the political machine, turning symbolic protestors into real activists, building self-determined communities or simply being ourselves – connected, free human beings.

In addition to the underminers.org, Farnish also hosts www.KeithFarnish.com and www.theearthblog.org.

 

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