Special Programming: Public Affairs

Episode Archive

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 02/11/10

Categories:
Air date: 
Thu, 02/11/2010 - 11:00am - 11:30am

Bruce Silverman hosts a special look at this year's Portland International Film Festival, which begins today.

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 01/29/10

Air date: 
Fri, 01/29/2010 - 7:00pm - 8:30pm

John Perkins: How to remake the global economy

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 01/29/10

Categories:
Air date: 
Fri, 01/29/2010 - 7:00am - 8:30pm

Membership Drive Special: One Year Later – Where Do We Go From Here?
It’s been one year since the inauguration of President Barack Obama. How have progressive goals and proposals fared under his administration? Where do progressives go from here? What’s the future of activism on issues such as ending the wars and occupations in Afghanistan and Iraq? What about healthcare, saving the economy, the environment, trade policy, corporate domination, and education?
As Bill Moyers has said about the U.S., ”We are a very crippled giant suffering from self inflicted wounds that if we do not treat and heal, will in fact bring us to our knees and ultimately to our doom. We are close to losing the moral, financial, economic muscle and wisdom that makes a big nation a great nation.”

7 am - Democracy Now!
8 am – Positively Revolting Talk Radio with host Ani Haines
9 am – Robert McChesney and John Nichols
10 am – Power and Change: Speakers of the Illahee Lecture Series

          The Power to Change Our Minds - Jonah Lehrer
          Power, Change and Energy - Richard Heinberg

10:45 – Obama and Change: Phyllis Bennis, Institute for Public Accuracy

11:00 – Amy Goodman: Take Back the Airwaves
12:00 – Noam Chomsky in Portland
1:30 – Barbara Ehrenreich: on her new book, Bright-Sided: How the Relentless Promotion of Positive Thinking Has Undermined America
Read more: Barbara Ehrenreich Takes on a Plague of Positive Thinking in 'Bright-Sided' 

2:00 - Obama and Change: David Swanson – afterdowningstreet.org
2:30 - Dolores Huerta: Farmworker organizer and rabble rouser for over 50 years
3:00 - Tribute to Howard Zinn, who died on January 27th, 2010 (including a live tribute by radio legend David Barsamian)

Listen to Bill Bigelow interviewing Howard Zinn on January 19th
4:00 - Democracy Now! with Amy Goodman and Juan Gonzalez
5:00 - KBOO Evening News
6:00 - Bread and Roses: Beekeeping!
7:00 - John Perkins: How to remake the global economy

 

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 01/22/10

Categories:
Air date: 
Fri, 01/22/2010 - 11:00am - 12:00pm

A special program featuring anarchist activist Margaret Killjoy and writer Ursula K. Le Guin talking about anarchism, fiction and the new book "Mythmakers and Lawbreakers," a collection of interviews with a wide variety of anarchist fiction writers–some of whom who are tangentially involved in anarchism, or fiction, or both, but all of whom have really fascinating takes on the subject.

Published by AK Press and edited by Margaret Killjoy, "Mythmakers and Lawbreatkers" includes conversations with sci-fi powerhouses Ursula K. Le Guin, Alan Moore, Michael Moorcock, and Lewis Shiner as well as young and emerging writers in a series of interviews that explore fiction's deeply political roots.

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 01/13/10

Air date: 
Wed, 01/13/2010 - 6:00pm - 7:00pm

Tune in this coming Wednesday, January 13th from 6 to 7 pm, for a special on the upcoming Vancouver Winter Olympics, and the coalition of indigenous, environmental and housing activists that have come together to oppose the theft of indigenous land for the Olympic games. 

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 12/30/09

Air date: 
Wed, 12/30/2009 - 9:00am - 8:00pm
Short Description: 
Israel's Gaza Invasion - one year later

Israel's Gaza Invasion: One year later

After a devastating Israeli assault on the Gaza Strip from Dec. 27, 2008 - Jan. 20, 2009 which resulted in over 1400 Palestinians killed by Israelis and 5 Israelis killed by Palestinians, the population of Gaza has been unable to rebuild the 20,000 destroyed homes and buildings due to an ongoing Israeli-imposed siege.  A year after the attack, we look at what role the US has played in the ongoing assault on Gaza, the solidarity marches which will be arriving at the Gaza border as we speak, and examine the history of the refugee population of the Gaza Strip.  Tune in from 8 am to 8 pm on Wednesday, December 30th, for our all day special on Gaza.

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 12/29/09

Air date: 
Tue, 12/29/2009 - 10:00am - 10:15am

KBOO's Jenka Soderberg interviews members of the Gaza Freedom March, who are scheduled to cross into Gaza on December 30th with over 1400 marchers from around the world.

More info on the Gaza Freedom March

CODEPINK recently put out a statement: “Citing escalating tensions on the Gaza-Egypt border, the Egyptian Foreign Ministry informed us on Dec. 20 that the Rafah border will be closed over the coming weeks, into January. We responded that there is always tension at the border because of the siege and that if there are any risks, they are risks we are willing to take. We also said that it was too late for over 1,360 delegates coming from over 42 countries to change their plans now.

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 12/28/09

Air date: 
Mon, 12/28/2009 - 10:00am - 10:15am

KBOO's Jenka Soderberg interviews members of the 'Artery of Life' aid caravan to the Gaza Strip, which is currently stuck on the Jordanian-Egyptian border.

The latest word from the caravan, which has travelled by land from England to bring humanitarian aid to the Gaza Strip:

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 11/30/09

Air date: 
Mon, 11/30/2009 - 8:00am - 8:00pm
Short Description: 
WHOSE STREETS? OUR STREETS!!

WHOSE STREETS?  OUR STREETS!!

Missed the special?  Click here to listen to the audio!

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 11/26/09

Air date: 
Thu, 11/26/2009 - 5:00pm - 6:00pm

5:00 - 6:00 pm Thurs. Nov. 26th

Jenka Soderberg interviews Dhoruba bin Wahad, who is speaking from a hotel in Jordan after being detained and then denied entry into Palestine by Israeli authorities.  bin Wahad is a former political prisoner in the US who was charged in 1971 with the murder of two police officers, but was vindicated nineteen years later when a judge ruled that the FBI had fabricated evidence in order to frame bin Wahad of a crime he didn't commit.

As an African-American, on his way to a conference on political prisoners convened by the Palestinian Authority in the city of Jericho, bin Wahad feels that he was racially profiled, along with his travelling companion Naji Mujahid - the only two African Americans on a busload of white tourists.

Audio

Cascadia Rising: Biocentric Resistance panel, Part 1

program date: 
Mon, 04/28/2014
 

Biocentric Resistance as Catalyst for Bioregional Resistance

A workshop led by Karen Coulter

mountainAs the global climate crisis and the spreading radiation from the Fukishima nuclear reactor melt-down demonstrate, the destruction that humans cause to the environment now transcends national boundaries and cannot be repaired with technological solutions or societal value systems that continue to prioritize human desires above ecological limits. For bioregionalism to work in creating a viable future, it is necessary to have a biocentric value system, in which the well-being and flourishing of non-human life has value in itself, independent of the usefulness of the non-human world for human purposes. The richness and diversity of life forms are valuable in themselves.

The philosophy of Deep Ecology posits that humans have no right to reduce the richness and diversity of ecosystems except to satisfy vital human needs. Present human interference with the non-human world is excessive and is rapidly worsening. Policies that need to be changed affect basic economic, technological, and ideological structures. Deep ecologists believe that those who subscribe to these ideas have an obligation to try to implement the necessary changes.

This workshop on Biocentrism and Deep Ecology explains these concepts, explores what changes would need to be made, and examines activist struggles and movements within Cascadia that have pursued these goals.

BIO: Karen Coulter has been part of the Earth First! movement since 1984 and an activist since 1980. She is a naturalist who has spent the last 23 years as co-founder and director of Blue Mountains Biodiversity Project getting to know the forest ecosystems and wildlife of eastern Oregon. She has spent most of every summer in the forests field-surveying thousands of acres of proposed timber sales to protect biodiversity and ecological integrity. She has also been a principal activist with the Program on Corporations, Law, and Democracy; a Board member of the Fund for Wild Nature; and a campaigner for Greenpeace International. She currently volunteers withPortland Rising Tide and works with Blue Mountains Biodiversity Project. She has given workshops on Biocentrism and Deep Ecology at an Earth First! Organizers Conference in Florida and at an Earth First! regional rendezvous in Oregon.

  • Length: 46:00 minutes (42.12 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Cascadia Rising: "Appropriate Appropriation" panel, Part 2

program date: 
Mon, 04/28/2014

Appropriate Appropriation and Ancestral Technology

A Panel with Peter Bauer and Eric Bernardo

glassknapping2-300x200There is growing interest in using ancestral technology as a mechanism for living more sustainably, connecting with ancestral heritage, and providing for yourself with things from nature, or the simple enjoyment of crafting with your hands. While all humans have used various forms of these technologies, there is often friction between Native Americans and non-natives in the United States. This friction stems from the misappropriation of these technologies by non-natives, the privileged position non-native people have of being able to do these things at all (i.e. financial access to schools and gatherings), and a general lack of knowledge of traditional “prehistoric” European traditions among both Native Americans and non-natives. There will never be one right way to practice ancestral technology in a way that appeases everyone’s sensibilities. However, we must spark this discussion on a larger scale to increase the number of people working together and to reach a deeper understanding between different cultures in order to have mutual respect. This panel discussion is a step in that direction.

Questions to be discussed:

  • Where is the line between reclaiming your own ancestral heritage and culturally appropriating from Natives?
  • Is there a way to appropriately appropriate? What technologies have been shared by all human cultures?
  • How does entitlement fit into this discussion?
  • How does privilege fit into this discussion?
  • How do we go about creating alliances and allies between Native Americans and non-natives in using ancestral technologies?

BIOS: Eric Bernardo is a member of the Watlala Band of Chinuk of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. He received my Masters Degree in Education in 2009 from the University of Oregon and a Bachelors of Arts: History from PSU back in 2008. Go Blazers! He is currently teaching his tribe’s indigenous language at their office in Portland and at a community centre in Eugene.

Peter Bauer (formerly writing under the moniker “Urban Scout”) is a multi-disciplinary artist and environmental educator. During his time as urban scout he received local press in the The Oregonian, Portland Mercury, Willamette Week, national press in ReadyMade Magazine and international press in Positive Living Magazine (UK) and Chain Reaction (AU) for his efforts to create and promote the culture of rewilding. He loves basketry, playing the banjo, and is a fluent speaker of Chinuk Wawa (Chinook Jargon), the Native trade language of the Pacific Northwest. During the summer of 2012 he attended Lynx Vilden’s Stone Age immersion program. Bauer has been an environmental educator for over a decade, working with local organizations like Cascadia Wild, Friends of Tryon Creek, Audubon Society, Portland Waldorf, Shining Star Waldorf, Cleveland High School, and is the executive director at Rewild Portland, a non-profit that he founded. Aside from running Rewild Portland, he currently works at Shining Star Waldorf School in Portland as an instructor for their Nature Immersion Program.



  • Length: 40:04 minutes (36.69 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Cascadia Rising:"Appropriate Appropriation" panel, Part 1

program date: 
Mon, 04/28/2014

Appropriate Appropriation and Ancestral Technology

A Panel with Peter Bauer and Eric Bernardo

glassknapping2-300x200There is growing interest in using ancestral technology as a mechanism for living more sustainably, connecting with ancestral heritage, and providing for yourself with things from nature, or the simple enjoyment of crafting with your hands. While all humans have used various forms of these technologies, there is often friction between Native Americans and non-natives in the United States. This friction stems from the misappropriation of these technologies by non-natives, the privileged position non-native people have of being able to do these things at all (i.e. financial access to schools and gatherings), and a general lack of knowledge of traditional “prehistoric” European traditions among both Native Americans and non-natives. There will never be one right way to practice ancestral technology in a way that appeases everyone’s sensibilities. However, we must spark this discussion on a larger scale to increase the number of people working together and to reach a deeper understanding between different cultures in order to have mutual respect. This panel discussion is a step in that direction.

Questions to be discussed:

  • Where is the line between reclaiming your own ancestral heritage and culturally appropriating from Natives?
  • Is there a way to appropriately appropriate? What technologies have been shared by all human cultures?
  • How does entitlement fit into this discussion?
  • How does privilege fit into this discussion?
  • How do we go about creating alliances and allies between Native Americans and non-natives in using ancestral technologies?

BIOS: Eric Bernardo is a member of the Watlala Band of Chinuk of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. He received my Masters Degree in Education in 2009 from the University of Oregon and a Bachelors of Arts: History from PSU back in 2008. Go Blazers! He is currently teaching his tribe’s indigenous language at their office in Portland and at a community centre in Eugene.

Peter Bauer (formerly writing under the moniker “Urban Scout”) is a multi-disciplinary artist and environmental educator. During his time as urban scout he received local press in the The Oregonian, Portland Mercury, Willamette Week, national press in ReadyMade Magazine and international press in Positive Living Magazine (UK) and Chain Reaction (AU) for his efforts to create and promote the culture of rewilding. He loves basketry, playing the banjo, and is a fluent speaker of Chinuk Wawa (Chinook Jargon), the Native trade language of the Pacific Northwest. During the summer of 2012 he attended Lynx Vilden’s Stone Age immersion program. Bauer has been an environmental educator for over a decade, working with local organizations like Cascadia Wild, Friends of Tryon Creek, Audubon Society, Portland Waldorf, Shining Star Waldorf, Cleveland High School, and is the executive director at Rewild Portland, a non-profit that he founded. Aside from running Rewild Portland, he currently works at Shining Star Waldorf School in Portland as an instructor for their Nature Immersion Program.



  • Length: 44:49 minutes (41.03 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Cascadia Rising: Biocentric Resistance panel, Part 2

program date: 
Mon, 04/28/2014

Biocentric Resistance as Catalyst for Bioregional Resistance

A workshop led by Karen Coulter

mountainAs the global climate crisis and the spreading radiation from the Fukishima nuclear reactor melt-down demonstrate, the destruction that humans cause to the environment now transcends national boundaries and cannot be repaired with technological solutions or societal value systems that continue to prioritize human desires above ecological limits. For bioregionalism to work in creating a viable future, it is necessary to have a biocentric value system, in which the well-being and flourishing of non-human life has value in itself, independent of the usefulness of the non-human world for human purposes. The richness and diversity of life forms are valuable in themselves.

The philosophy of Deep Ecology posits that humans have no right to reduce the richness and diversity of ecosystems except to satisfy vital human needs. Present human interference with the non-human world is excessive and is rapidly worsening. Policies that need to be changed affect basic economic, technological, and ideological structures. Deep ecologists believe that those who subscribe to these ideas have an obligation to try to implement the necessary changes.

This workshop on Biocentrism and Deep Ecology explains these concepts, explores what changes would need to be made, and examines activist struggles and movements within Cascadia that have pursued these goals.

BIO: Karen Coulter has been part of the Earth First! movement since 1984 and an activist since 1980. She is a naturalist who has spent the last 23 years as co-founder and director of Blue Mountains Biodiversity Project getting to know the forest ecosystems and wildlife of eastern Oregon. She has spent most of every summer in the forests field-surveying thousands of acres of proposed timber sales to protect biodiversity and ecological integrity. She has also been a principal activist with the Program on Corporations, Law, and Democracy; a Board member of the Fund for Wild Nature; and a campaigner for Greenpeace International. She currently volunteers withPortland Rising Tide and works with Blue Mountains Biodiversity Project. She has given workshops on Biocentrism and Deep Ecology at an Earth First! Organizers Conference in Florida and at an Earth First! regional rendezvous in Oregon.

 

Cascadia Rising: Calling Ourselves Home, led by Rain Crowe

program date: 
Sun, 04/27/2014
 

Calling Ourselves Home: Feeling the Path of Right Relationship

A workshop led by Rain Crowe

callinourselveshomeFeeling for the Path of Right Relationship

To those of us of Indo-European descent, living here on unceded indigenous lands, I offer this inquiry and framing, that we might together find a courage to face, what we must, for the sake of the imperiled web of life.

What is “whiteness” and how do we accountably reckon with the privileges of settler colonialism as we endeavor to cultivate a sacred relationship to lands that are not our biological and cultural forebears’?

How do we recognize the patterns of conquest, slavery, entitlement, and estrangement in our lives and work to intervene in replicating them?

What are the relationships between grief, shame, vulnerability, and action, in the context of decolonizing ourselves?

How do we continue to simultaneously compost the culture of Empire and regenerate non-appropriated Earth cultures?

What are some approaches to collectively healing inter-generational trauma and cross-cultural trauma?

Note: in this forum, we’ll endeavor upon a meandering process of a journey, not a high speed arrival at a predetermined destination. I’ll be presenting some of my own explorations and beliefs (not answers) about these questions, and we’ll have space for arising reflections and inquiries amongst the group. This time is meant to demonstrate a template for discussion and to inspire the participants to carry on with these questions and more outside of this forum. We are working with a finite amount of time, and to the best of my ability I’ll ensure that we have a healthy closure to our time together.

BIO: rain crowe is the founder of Calling Ourselves Home, a body of work dedicated to cultivating the arts of interdependent relationships through group facilitation, mediation, and educational opportunities. She is a regenerative culture events organizer who works with spiritual, political, rewilding, and intentional communities all over the country. She teaches and writes about magic and ritual, the ancestral skills of council making and restorative conflict transformation, systems thinking in radical organizing, and ecstatic connection to the sacred. callingourselveshome.weebly.com

Cascadia Rising: Emergency Preparedness, Community Resilience and Sustainability

program date: 
Sun, 04/27/2014

Emergency Preparedness, Community Resilience & Sustainability: Same Idea, Different Timescales

A panel featuring Jeremy O’Leary, Charla Chamberlain and Leif Brecke, 11 AM, Room 236

tool-box-iconJeremy O’Leary will be speaking from his experience working with federal, state, and local programs that are meant to help communities prepare for disasters. As a permaculturalist, his methods for disaster preparedness integrate general community resilience and not solely emergency preparedness, or what he calls, “the long emergency”. Charla Chamberlain will speak to her experience having been a community organizer with City Repair in Portland for over a decade. She will discuss the successes and challenges she found in getting neighbors to work together towards common goals. Leif will be discussing how the formation of a Cascadia Resilience Network is taking place the direction he envisions it going.

BIOS: If there is an organization in Portland that has to do with livability and sustainability issues, chances are Jeremy O’Leary is involved with it to some degree. With prior experiences with the city’s Peak Oil Task Force, along withTransition PDX, overseeing TheDirt.orgPortland Permaculture Guild, participating with the City’s Local Energy Assurance Plan (LEAP), and also the FooDiversity group that looks at food and garden issues in East Portland. Jeremy is also an IT staffer for Multnomah County, for which he served on the steering committee for the Multnomah Food Initiative.

Charla Chamberlain grew up in the suburbs of Seattle, Washington as a mixed race woman in a primarily white population in the 1970′s. She was a founding Board member, Co-Director, Intersection Repair Program, T-Horse, Volunteer, and Earth Day Celebration Coordinator with The City Repair Project from 1997-2004. She studied Community Development at Portland State University and is passionate about neighborhoods and cities building collaborative networks of relationship. She is currently the Development Co-Manager, Communications at Sisters Of The Road, a nonprofit cafe building authentic relationships to alleviate the hunger of isolation in Old Town/Chinatown. She enjoys making her own yogurt, kimchi, and shrub, singing in the sunshine of her backyard, and talking to strangers in restaurants.

Leif Brecke is a long time activist and fifth generation Cascadian forest worker. He is a veteran of the bioregion’s forest defense and anti-corporate globalization movements. Leif is the Program Coordinator of the Resilient Communities Project and the Social Systems Facilitator at the Cascadian Resilience Network. A graduate of the University of Oregon with a B.S. in Cultural Anthropology, his research interests are network theory, complex systems, community resilience, and community resistance.

 
  • Length: 70:39 minutes (80.85 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 160Kbps (CBR)

Cascadia Against Empire: Bioregional Organizing from a Decolonizing Perspective (Part 2)

program date: 
Wed, 04/16/2014
2014 Public Interest Environmetal Law Conference panel. Part 2, Q & A/discussion. For panelists, see Part !.
  • Length: 35:25 minutes (81.07 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 320Kbps (CBR)

Cascadia Against Empire: Bioregional Organizing from a Decolonizing Perspective

program date: 
Tue, 04/15/2014
2014 Public Interest Environmental Law Conference panel, with Alexander Reid Ross, Earth First! Journal Collective Member; Paul Roland, KBOO Radio Public Affairs programmer, Earth First!er and member of Cascadia Portland Branch; Casey Corcoran, bioregional and food sovereignty organizer in Bend, OR, co-editor or "Autonomy Cascadia: A Journal of Bioregional Decolonization" and co-producer of "Occupied Cascadia" film; Kayla Godow Tufti, member of Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, activist in Eugene and contributing writer to Eugene Weekly.

Paul Roland talks with Keith Farnish, author of "Underminers," by phone from Scotland

Categories:
program date: 
Fri, 02/14/2014
From the website www.underminers.org:

"Industrial Civilization is likely to be the last great empire humanity will ever see. If it is allowed to continue in its ravenous way then there is no future for humanity, for the natural systems and processes that allow humans to exist on Earth are the very things that Industrial Civilization is destroying. In fact, no form of civilization has ever been sustainable nor ever will be. In order for humanity to continue on Earth then civilization has to stop, and people allowed to return to a way of living that is connected to the real world.

We are not able to do this. At least not until we become Underminers. The industrial system depends, for its survival, on humans being disconnected from the real world and mentally attached to the machine that we fuel with our civilized lives. The Tools of Disconnection keep us in that state, and the only way to prevent us from being responsible for our demise is to undermine those Tools of Disconnection. Once we are free from the grip of the machine and reconnected with the real world then the myth of Industrial Civilization will die, and humanity will be able to continue.

Underminers is the timely follow-up to Time’s Up! An Uncivilized Solution to a Global Crisis. It takes up where that book left off, with a detailed, highly practical approach to the process of undermining in all its many hues. At once entertaining, shocking and inspiring, Underminers draws on the author’s own experience dealing at first hand with the lies of the industrial machine, and that of a wide range of other people who have their own unique take on the swath of topics covered in the book.

From the reasons we are unable to act, to the nitty-gritty of keeping ourselves and others safe during the undermining process, the first half of the book is an invaluable guide to navigating the industrial system and becoming a fully-formed Underminer. The second half details, with surprising openness how the reader can utilize their abilities and new-found determination to be an effective Underminer; whether that be undermining the advertising industry or the political machine, turning symbolic protestors into real activists, building self-determined communities or simply being ourselves – connected, free human beings."

In addition to the underminers.org site, Farnish also hosts www.KeithFarnish.com and www.theearthblog.com.

 

Interview with Keith Farnish by phone from Scotland

Categories:
program date: 
Fri, 02/14/2014
From the website www.underminers.org:

Industrial Civilization is likely to be the last great empire humanity will ever see. If it is allowed to continue in its ravenous way then there is no future for humanity, for the natural systems and processes that allow humans to exist on Earth are the very things that Industrial Civilization is destroying. In fact, no form of civilization has ever been sustainable nor ever will be. In order for humanity to continue on Earth then civilization has to stop, and people allowed to return to a way of living that is connected to the real world.

We are not able to do this. At least not until we become Underminers. The industrial system depends, for its survival, on humans being disconnected from the real world and mentally attached to the machine that we fuel with our civilized lives. The Tools of Disconnection keep us in that state, and the only way to prevent us from being responsible for our demise is to undermine those Tools of Disconnection. Once we are free from the grip of the machine and reconnected with the real world then the myth of Industrial Civilization will die, and humanity will be able to continue.

Underminers is the timely follow-up to Time’s Up! An Uncivilized Solution to a Global Crisis. It takes up where that book left off, with a detailed, highly practical approach to the process of undermining in all its many hues. At once entertaining, shocking and inspiring, Underminers draws on the author’s own experience dealing at first hand with the lies of the industrial machine, and that of a wide range of other people who have their own unique take on the swath of topics covered in the book.

From the reasons we are unable to act, to the nitty-gritty of keeping ourselves and others safe during the undermining process, the first half of the book is an invaluable guide to navigating the industrial system and becoming a fully-formed Underminer. The second half details, with surprising openness how the reader can utilize their abilities and new-found determination to be an effective Underminer; whether that be undermining the advertising industry or the political machine, turning symbolic protestors into real activists, building self-determined communities or simply being ourselves – connected, free human beings.

In addition to the underminers.org, Farnish also hosts www.KeithFarnish.com and www.theearthblog.org.

 

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