Special Programming: Public Affairs

Episode Archive

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 10/05/12

Air date: 
Fri, 10/05/2012 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Fighting the Fluoridation of Portland's Water Supply

On September 12th, the Portland City Council voted 5-0 to add fluoridating chemicals to our Bull Run water. This is a highly contentious issue, as Portlanders have already rejected forced fluoridation three times at the polls.

Joe Meyer hosts a program in two parts:

First he speaks with Howard Patterson, MEM (Masters Degree in Environmental Management), and Jeff Fryer, PhD in fisheries, about the impact of fluoridating chemicals after they go down the drain.

In the second part of the show he interviews Kimberly Kaminski, Executive Director Oregon Citizens for Safe Drinking Water, who is working on a referendum to reverse the City Council decision.

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 10/03/12

Categories:
Air date: 
Wed, 10/03/2012 - 7:00pm - 8:00pm
Short Description: 
Alternative presidential debate

EXPANDING THE DEBATE: Third Party Candidates Participate in Real Time on Democracy Now!’s Live Coverage of First Presidential Debate

Featuring Jill Stein of the Green Party and Rocky Anderson of the Justice Party
October 3rd 8:30-11:30pm ET /5:30-8:30pm PT

Click here for Democracy Now's recording of the debate

KBOO will broadcast this event from 7 to 8 pm on the air (90.7 FM), and will stream the entire event online.

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 10/01/12

Categories:
Air date: 
Mon, 10/01/2012 - 7:00pm - 8:00pm
Short Description: 
Portland Mayoral Candidate Forum

The Center for Intercultural Organizing as hosted a Portland Mayoral Candidate Forum on Monday October 1st before the upcoming runoff election on November 6th.  KBOO was there, and streamed the event live.

Part one - pre-debate discussion with former US Congressional 1st District candidate Saba Ahmed

Part two - Introduction and full debate - Charlie Hales and Jefferson Smith at CIO addressing the concerns of the immigrant and refugee community

Part three - post-debate discussion with both candidates and former state legislator Joanne Hardesty

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 09/11/12

Categories:
Air date: 
Tue, 09/11/2012 - 7:00pm - 7:30pm
Short Description: 
Architects and engineers for 9/11 Truth

This Tuesday marks the 11th anniversary of the September 11th attacks that resulted in thousands of deaths and ushered in an era of prisoner torture, loss of civil liberties and an endless war on terror. And yet, inconsistencies about the official explanation of the attacks themselves have never been adequately addressed by public officials. On September 11th at 7 pm, KBOO hosts a local representative of Architects and Engineers for 9-11 Truth who will address some of these ongoing inconsistencies and share information about local informational events.

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 08/30/12

Air date: 
Thu, 08/30/2012 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
RAMPS Campaign West Virginia

Talk Nation Radio: How Young People Shut Down a Strip Mine in West Virginia and Why

Eva Westheimer was recently arrested for shutting down a strip mine in West Virginia, along with Radical Action for Mountain People's Survival ( http://rampscampaign.org ). Westheimer is a junior at Warren Wilson College in North Carolina. She describes the recent action she took, the ongoing campaign, and what motivates her.

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 08/08/12

Air date: 
Wed, 08/08/2012 - 7:00pm - 8:00pm
Short Description: 
Learn about the 2012 candidates for the KBOO Board of Directors on the Candidates On-Air Forum

Want to know more about the 2012 candidates for the KBOO Board of Directors? Tune in to the Candidate On-Air Forums Tuesday, August 7 and Wednesday, August 8 from 7-8pm.

Tonight's candidates include: Alejandro Ceballos, Damon Isiah Turner, John Mackey, and Jeff Kipilman

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 08/07/12

Air date: 
Tue, 08/07/2012 - 7:00pm - 8:00pm
Short Description: 
Learn about the 2012 candidates for the KBOO Board of Directors on the Candidates On-Air Forum

Want to know more about the 2012 candidates for the KBOO Board of Directors? Tune in to the Candidate On-Air Forums Tuesday, August 7 and Wednesday, August 8 from 7-8pm.

Tonight's candidates include: Michael Papadopoulos, David Haseltine, Matthew Bristow, and Rabia Yeaman

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 08/07/12

Categories:
Air date: 
Tue, 08/07/2012 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Saluting the life of Gore Vidal with excerpts from recorded talks

Both Stage and Studio and Art Focus are off today.

We'll hear "From The Vault," from the Pacifica Radio Archives, a program saluting the life and work of a great American playright, author, actor and commentator Gore Vidal, who died on July 31st, 2012.

This program features an excerpt from a talk by Gore Vidal in 1966 called "The New Novel in the Age of Science," another excerpt from a talk on January 12, 1991 a few days before President George Herbert Walker Bush began operation Desert Storm, and an excerpt from the final recording of Gore Vidal in the Archives. Conducted by Pacifica Radio producer Maria Armoudian in October of 2008 just before the election of President Barack Obama over Republican Candidates John McCain and Sarah Palin.

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 07/04/12

Categories:
Air date: 
Wed, 07/04/2012 - 10:15am - 11:00am
Short Description: 
Radio Ecoshock on Shale Gas Emmissions

Radio Ecoshock reports on how shale gas emissions are as bad as coal. New science from Cornell University Professor Robert Howarth and team: a speech at Peak Oil And Gas conference in Washington; plus a follow-up interview with Howarth by Alex Smith.

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 05/28/12

Air date: 
Mon, 05/28/2012 - 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Short Description: 
Occupy Wall Street Radio

Instead of your regular scheduled PM Newscast, we bring you WBAI produced "Occupy Wall Street Radio." 

The initial Occupy Wall Street Radio aired on October 26, 2011. The show can be heard Monday through Friday from 6:30 to 7 PM on WBAI.   Here is an archive of past shows.  Hear the voices, the heart, the soul of this 99% growing and now global movement.

Audio

Cascadia Rising: Climate Chaos panel

Categories:
program date: 
Wed, 04/30/2014

Climate Chaos and Cascadia: Place-Based Resistance to Global Catastrophe

A Panel featuring Scott Schroder + Friends

clearcutkidsAnthropogenic climate change and the resulting mass extinction, drought, fire, flooding, and skewed weather patterns threaten the Cascadian bioregion, and any of our plans for rehabilitation, restoration, or reinhabitation, more profoundly than any other single industrial act of eco-assualt. Yet because climate change is not an immediately tangible act of destruction restricted to a single place and time, because we can’t see or hear climate change in the same way we can see and hear a dam or clearcut; a visceral sense of the threat of climate change is elusive. This panel breaks from abstract discussion of atmospheric greenhouse gases, and roots the issue in palpable and living things: wolverines, salmon, forests and in rapidly approaching catastrophic effects on the bioregion we call home. We will discuss the effects climate change has already had on the region–increased temperature, rising seas, more precipitation, diminished snowpack–and the landscapes and species that are threatened with extinction or severe alteration by the fossil fuel economy. We will discuss strategies and possibilities for human adaptedness and survival in the face of fundamental ecological changes. We will argue that effective resistance requires reconceiving a nebulous and global catastrophe as an eminent threat to this place and to any living thing who calls Cascadia home.

BIO:Beginning in the late 1990s, Scott Schroder participated in campaigns against industrial logging throughout the western United States with various Earth First! groups, as well as organizing large-scale resistance to clearcutting in the Sierra Nevada with Yuba Nation. Simultaneously, he succeeded in stopping numerous National Forest timber sales with administrative appeals. In 2008, he was a founding member of the Doom School art collective in Portland and later curated music and performances at the Hall of the Woods outside of Olympia, Washington. More recently, he has organized direct action against fossil fuels in California and Oregon and written on the climate policies of both states. He creates a blog and zine, Spring Speaks Truth, and is on probation for blockading tar sands equipment en route through Oregon to Alberta, Canada.

 
  • Length: 70:03 minutes (64.14 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Cascadia Rising: Opening

Categories:
program date: 
Wed, 04/30/2014
Opening of Cascadia Rising: A Bioregional Confluence, with organizers Elona Trogub and Emmalyn Garrett; Alexander Baretich, designer of the Cascadian flag; and Brandon Letsinger of Cascadia Now!
  • Length: 18:38 minutes (17.06 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Cascadia Rising: Biocentric Resistance panel, Part 2

program date: 
Mon, 04/28/2014

Biocentric Resistance as Catalyst for Bioregional Resistance

A workshop led by Karen Coulter

mountainAs the global climate crisis and the spreading radiation from the Fukishima nuclear reactor melt-down demonstrate, the destruction that humans cause to the environment now transcends national boundaries and cannot be repaired with technological solutions or societal value systems that continue to prioritize human desires above ecological limits. For bioregionalism to work in creating a viable future, it is necessary to have a biocentric value system, in which the well-being and flourishing of non-human life has value in itself, independent of the usefulness of the non-human world for human purposes. The richness and diversity of life forms are valuable in themselves.

The philosophy of Deep Ecology posits that humans have no right to reduce the richness and diversity of ecosystems except to satisfy vital human needs. Present human interference with the non-human world is excessive and is rapidly worsening. Policies that need to be changed affect basic economic, technological, and ideological structures. Deep ecologists believe that those who subscribe to these ideas have an obligation to try to implement the necessary changes.

This workshop on Biocentrism and Deep Ecology explains these concepts, explores what changes would need to be made, and examines activist struggles and movements within Cascadia that have pursued these goals.

BIO: Karen Coulter has been part of the Earth First! movement since 1984 and an activist since 1980. She is a naturalist who has spent the last 23 years as co-founder and director of Blue Mountains Biodiversity Project getting to know the forest ecosystems and wildlife of eastern Oregon. She has spent most of every summer in the forests field-surveying thousands of acres of proposed timber sales to protect biodiversity and ecological integrity. She has also been a principal activist with the Program on Corporations, Law, and Democracy; a Board member of the Fund for Wild Nature; and a campaigner for Greenpeace International. She currently volunteers withPortland Rising Tide and works with Blue Mountains Biodiversity Project. She has given workshops on Biocentrism and Deep Ecology at an Earth First! Organizers Conference in Florida and at an Earth First! regional rendezvous in Oregon.

 

Cascadia Rising: Biocentric Resistance panel, Part 1

program date: 
Mon, 04/28/2014
 

Biocentric Resistance as Catalyst for Bioregional Resistance

A workshop led by Karen Coulter

mountainAs the global climate crisis and the spreading radiation from the Fukishima nuclear reactor melt-down demonstrate, the destruction that humans cause to the environment now transcends national boundaries and cannot be repaired with technological solutions or societal value systems that continue to prioritize human desires above ecological limits. For bioregionalism to work in creating a viable future, it is necessary to have a biocentric value system, in which the well-being and flourishing of non-human life has value in itself, independent of the usefulness of the non-human world for human purposes. The richness and diversity of life forms are valuable in themselves.

The philosophy of Deep Ecology posits that humans have no right to reduce the richness and diversity of ecosystems except to satisfy vital human needs. Present human interference with the non-human world is excessive and is rapidly worsening. Policies that need to be changed affect basic economic, technological, and ideological structures. Deep ecologists believe that those who subscribe to these ideas have an obligation to try to implement the necessary changes.

This workshop on Biocentrism and Deep Ecology explains these concepts, explores what changes would need to be made, and examines activist struggles and movements within Cascadia that have pursued these goals.

BIO: Karen Coulter has been part of the Earth First! movement since 1984 and an activist since 1980. She is a naturalist who has spent the last 23 years as co-founder and director of Blue Mountains Biodiversity Project getting to know the forest ecosystems and wildlife of eastern Oregon. She has spent most of every summer in the forests field-surveying thousands of acres of proposed timber sales to protect biodiversity and ecological integrity. She has also been a principal activist with the Program on Corporations, Law, and Democracy; a Board member of the Fund for Wild Nature; and a campaigner for Greenpeace International. She currently volunteers withPortland Rising Tide and works with Blue Mountains Biodiversity Project. She has given workshops on Biocentrism and Deep Ecology at an Earth First! Organizers Conference in Florida and at an Earth First! regional rendezvous in Oregon.

  • Length: 46:00 minutes (42.12 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Cascadia Rising: "Appropriate Appropriation" panel, Part 2

program date: 
Mon, 04/28/2014

Appropriate Appropriation and Ancestral Technology

A Panel with Peter Bauer and Eric Bernardo

glassknapping2-300x200There is growing interest in using ancestral technology as a mechanism for living more sustainably, connecting with ancestral heritage, and providing for yourself with things from nature, or the simple enjoyment of crafting with your hands. While all humans have used various forms of these technologies, there is often friction between Native Americans and non-natives in the United States. This friction stems from the misappropriation of these technologies by non-natives, the privileged position non-native people have of being able to do these things at all (i.e. financial access to schools and gatherings), and a general lack of knowledge of traditional “prehistoric” European traditions among both Native Americans and non-natives. There will never be one right way to practice ancestral technology in a way that appeases everyone’s sensibilities. However, we must spark this discussion on a larger scale to increase the number of people working together and to reach a deeper understanding between different cultures in order to have mutual respect. This panel discussion is a step in that direction.

Questions to be discussed:

  • Where is the line between reclaiming your own ancestral heritage and culturally appropriating from Natives?
  • Is there a way to appropriately appropriate? What technologies have been shared by all human cultures?
  • How does entitlement fit into this discussion?
  • How does privilege fit into this discussion?
  • How do we go about creating alliances and allies between Native Americans and non-natives in using ancestral technologies?

BIOS: Eric Bernardo is a member of the Watlala Band of Chinuk of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. He received my Masters Degree in Education in 2009 from the University of Oregon and a Bachelors of Arts: History from PSU back in 2008. Go Blazers! He is currently teaching his tribe’s indigenous language at their office in Portland and at a community centre in Eugene.

Peter Bauer (formerly writing under the moniker “Urban Scout”) is a multi-disciplinary artist and environmental educator. During his time as urban scout he received local press in the The Oregonian, Portland Mercury, Willamette Week, national press in ReadyMade Magazine and international press in Positive Living Magazine (UK) and Chain Reaction (AU) for his efforts to create and promote the culture of rewilding. He loves basketry, playing the banjo, and is a fluent speaker of Chinuk Wawa (Chinook Jargon), the Native trade language of the Pacific Northwest. During the summer of 2012 he attended Lynx Vilden’s Stone Age immersion program. Bauer has been an environmental educator for over a decade, working with local organizations like Cascadia Wild, Friends of Tryon Creek, Audubon Society, Portland Waldorf, Shining Star Waldorf, Cleveland High School, and is the executive director at Rewild Portland, a non-profit that he founded. Aside from running Rewild Portland, he currently works at Shining Star Waldorf School in Portland as an instructor for their Nature Immersion Program.



  • Length: 40:04 minutes (36.69 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Cascadia Rising:"Appropriate Appropriation" panel, Part 1

program date: 
Mon, 04/28/2014

Appropriate Appropriation and Ancestral Technology

A Panel with Peter Bauer and Eric Bernardo

glassknapping2-300x200There is growing interest in using ancestral technology as a mechanism for living more sustainably, connecting with ancestral heritage, and providing for yourself with things from nature, or the simple enjoyment of crafting with your hands. While all humans have used various forms of these technologies, there is often friction between Native Americans and non-natives in the United States. This friction stems from the misappropriation of these technologies by non-natives, the privileged position non-native people have of being able to do these things at all (i.e. financial access to schools and gatherings), and a general lack of knowledge of traditional “prehistoric” European traditions among both Native Americans and non-natives. There will never be one right way to practice ancestral technology in a way that appeases everyone’s sensibilities. However, we must spark this discussion on a larger scale to increase the number of people working together and to reach a deeper understanding between different cultures in order to have mutual respect. This panel discussion is a step in that direction.

Questions to be discussed:

  • Where is the line between reclaiming your own ancestral heritage and culturally appropriating from Natives?
  • Is there a way to appropriately appropriate? What technologies have been shared by all human cultures?
  • How does entitlement fit into this discussion?
  • How does privilege fit into this discussion?
  • How do we go about creating alliances and allies between Native Americans and non-natives in using ancestral technologies?

BIOS: Eric Bernardo is a member of the Watlala Band of Chinuk of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. He received my Masters Degree in Education in 2009 from the University of Oregon and a Bachelors of Arts: History from PSU back in 2008. Go Blazers! He is currently teaching his tribe’s indigenous language at their office in Portland and at a community centre in Eugene.

Peter Bauer (formerly writing under the moniker “Urban Scout”) is a multi-disciplinary artist and environmental educator. During his time as urban scout he received local press in the The Oregonian, Portland Mercury, Willamette Week, national press in ReadyMade Magazine and international press in Positive Living Magazine (UK) and Chain Reaction (AU) for his efforts to create and promote the culture of rewilding. He loves basketry, playing the banjo, and is a fluent speaker of Chinuk Wawa (Chinook Jargon), the Native trade language of the Pacific Northwest. During the summer of 2012 he attended Lynx Vilden’s Stone Age immersion program. Bauer has been an environmental educator for over a decade, working with local organizations like Cascadia Wild, Friends of Tryon Creek, Audubon Society, Portland Waldorf, Shining Star Waldorf, Cleveland High School, and is the executive director at Rewild Portland, a non-profit that he founded. Aside from running Rewild Portland, he currently works at Shining Star Waldorf School in Portland as an instructor for their Nature Immersion Program.



  • Length: 44:49 minutes (41.03 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Cascadia Rising: Calling Ourselves Home, led by Rain Crowe

program date: 
Sun, 04/27/2014
 

Calling Ourselves Home: Feeling the Path of Right Relationship

A workshop led by Rain Crowe

callinourselveshomeFeeling for the Path of Right Relationship

To those of us of Indo-European descent, living here on unceded indigenous lands, I offer this inquiry and framing, that we might together find a courage to face, what we must, for the sake of the imperiled web of life.

What is “whiteness” and how do we accountably reckon with the privileges of settler colonialism as we endeavor to cultivate a sacred relationship to lands that are not our biological and cultural forebears’?

How do we recognize the patterns of conquest, slavery, entitlement, and estrangement in our lives and work to intervene in replicating them?

What are the relationships between grief, shame, vulnerability, and action, in the context of decolonizing ourselves?

How do we continue to simultaneously compost the culture of Empire and regenerate non-appropriated Earth cultures?

What are some approaches to collectively healing inter-generational trauma and cross-cultural trauma?

Note: in this forum, we’ll endeavor upon a meandering process of a journey, not a high speed arrival at a predetermined destination. I’ll be presenting some of my own explorations and beliefs (not answers) about these questions, and we’ll have space for arising reflections and inquiries amongst the group. This time is meant to demonstrate a template for discussion and to inspire the participants to carry on with these questions and more outside of this forum. We are working with a finite amount of time, and to the best of my ability I’ll ensure that we have a healthy closure to our time together.

BIO: rain crowe is the founder of Calling Ourselves Home, a body of work dedicated to cultivating the arts of interdependent relationships through group facilitation, mediation, and educational opportunities. She is a regenerative culture events organizer who works with spiritual, political, rewilding, and intentional communities all over the country. She teaches and writes about magic and ritual, the ancestral skills of council making and restorative conflict transformation, systems thinking in radical organizing, and ecstatic connection to the sacred. callingourselveshome.weebly.com

Cascadia Rising: Emergency Preparedness, Community Resilience and Sustainability

program date: 
Sun, 04/27/2014

Emergency Preparedness, Community Resilience & Sustainability: Same Idea, Different Timescales

A panel featuring Jeremy O’Leary, Charla Chamberlain and Leif Brecke, 11 AM, Room 236

tool-box-iconJeremy O’Leary will be speaking from his experience working with federal, state, and local programs that are meant to help communities prepare for disasters. As a permaculturalist, his methods for disaster preparedness integrate general community resilience and not solely emergency preparedness, or what he calls, “the long emergency”. Charla Chamberlain will speak to her experience having been a community organizer with City Repair in Portland for over a decade. She will discuss the successes and challenges she found in getting neighbors to work together towards common goals. Leif will be discussing how the formation of a Cascadia Resilience Network is taking place the direction he envisions it going.

BIOS: If there is an organization in Portland that has to do with livability and sustainability issues, chances are Jeremy O’Leary is involved with it to some degree. With prior experiences with the city’s Peak Oil Task Force, along withTransition PDX, overseeing TheDirt.orgPortland Permaculture Guild, participating with the City’s Local Energy Assurance Plan (LEAP), and also the FooDiversity group that looks at food and garden issues in East Portland. Jeremy is also an IT staffer for Multnomah County, for which he served on the steering committee for the Multnomah Food Initiative.

Charla Chamberlain grew up in the suburbs of Seattle, Washington as a mixed race woman in a primarily white population in the 1970′s. She was a founding Board member, Co-Director, Intersection Repair Program, T-Horse, Volunteer, and Earth Day Celebration Coordinator with The City Repair Project from 1997-2004. She studied Community Development at Portland State University and is passionate about neighborhoods and cities building collaborative networks of relationship. She is currently the Development Co-Manager, Communications at Sisters Of The Road, a nonprofit cafe building authentic relationships to alleviate the hunger of isolation in Old Town/Chinatown. She enjoys making her own yogurt, kimchi, and shrub, singing in the sunshine of her backyard, and talking to strangers in restaurants.

Leif Brecke is a long time activist and fifth generation Cascadian forest worker. He is a veteran of the bioregion’s forest defense and anti-corporate globalization movements. Leif is the Program Coordinator of the Resilient Communities Project and the Social Systems Facilitator at the Cascadian Resilience Network. A graduate of the University of Oregon with a B.S. in Cultural Anthropology, his research interests are network theory, complex systems, community resilience, and community resistance.

 
  • Length: 70:39 minutes (80.85 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 160Kbps (CBR)

Cascadia Against Empire: Bioregional Organizing from a Decolonizing Perspective (Part 2)

program date: 
Wed, 04/16/2014
2014 Public Interest Environmetal Law Conference panel. Part 2, Q & A/discussion. For panelists, see Part !.
  • Length: 35:25 minutes (81.07 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 320Kbps (CBR)

Cascadia Against Empire: Bioregional Organizing from a Decolonizing Perspective

program date: 
Tue, 04/15/2014
2014 Public Interest Environmental Law Conference panel, with Alexander Reid Ross, Earth First! Journal Collective Member; Paul Roland, KBOO Radio Public Affairs programmer, Earth First!er and member of Cascadia Portland Branch; Casey Corcoran, bioregional and food sovereignty organizer in Bend, OR, co-editor or "Autonomy Cascadia: A Journal of Bioregional Decolonization" and co-producer of "Occupied Cascadia" film; Kayla Godow Tufti, member of Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, activist in Eugene and contributing writer to Eugene Weekly.

 

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