Special Programming: Public Affairs

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A look at the state of homelessness today through the voices of homeless people and organizers

Episode Archive

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 07/04/13

Categories:
Air date: 
Thu, 07/04/2013 - 9:00am - 10:00am
Short Description: 
The American Dream and the Chinese Dream

Theresa Mitchell, host of Presswatch, and Per Fagereng, host of Fight the Empire, combine forces to host a special program for July 4th on "The American Dream and the Chinese Dream."

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 06/17/13

Air date: 
Mon, 06/17/2013 - 10:00am - 10:15am
Short Description: 
Local News

Host Per Fagereng interviews Moji Agha about the results of the Iranian elections.

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 05/30/13

Air date: 
Thu, 05/30/2013 - 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Short Description: 
Indigenous Experience NW

LIVE BROADCAST from the Indigenous Experience NW

Community, Family, and Tradition are MEDICINE WITHIN.

Scottish Rite Center

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 05/24/13

Air date: 
Fri, 05/24/2013 - 9:00am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
The Vanport flood and racism in Portland: sixty five years later

Sixty five years ago, the Columbia River flooded into the largest public housing project in the U-S at the time, leaving 18,500 people homeless, a large number of whom were black.  The event changed race relations in Portland forever.

On Friday May 24th, from 8 am to noon, KBOO presented a special program on the Vanport flood and racism in Portland, sixty five years later.

We featured historians and archived audio, as well as a discussion led by PSU professor and activist Walidah Imarisha asking ‘Why are there so few black people in Oregon’.

Listen to the full three hours by clicking the link above, or individual segments below:

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 05/22/13

Air date: 
Wed, 05/22/2013 - 7:00pm - 8:30pm
Short Description: 
Panel on The Portland Women’s Movement: Fighting for Ideas and Dollars

Live Broadcast on KBOO: Panel on The Portland Women’s Movement, Part 3: Building: Fighting for Ideas and Dollars

Organized by the History of Social Justice Organizing & the Center for Women, Politics and Policy

Where: 2nd floor Gallery, Urban Affairs Building, Portland State University, 506 SW Mill, Portland

Free and open to the public

Ten years before gaining official recognition as a program, female students and professors met to plan and implement the inclusion of Women's Studies courses at Portland State University. They held an event in the school’s ballroom and began offering ad hoc classes., later hiring a coordinator. Eventually Women’s Studies became an official program and then a department offering a major.

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 05/17/13

Air date: 
Fri, 05/17/2013 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Carrie Mae Weems

Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video - exhibit at Portland Art Museum ends on Sunday May 19, 2013

At the February 3 opening lecture for Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video, internationally noted contemporary artist Carrie Mae Weems reflected on some of the major themes in her thought-provoking photographic and video work, including an overarching commitment to promote justice as it relates to race, gender, and class issues.

Born and raised in Portland, Ore., Carrie Mae Weems is internationally recognized for her powerful photography-based art that investigates issues of race, gender, and societal class.

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 05/08/13

Air date: 
Wed, 05/08/2013 - 7:00pm - 8:00pm
Short Description: 
Illahee lecture LIVE on KBOO

Jeffrey Clements: Who Owns Our Government?

Live broadcast of the final talk in the 2013 Illahee Lecture Series.

AN ATTORNEY AND AUTHOR, Clements is the co-founder of Free Speech for People, a national, non-partisan campaign challenge the creation of Constitutional rights for corporations, overturn Citizens United v. FEC, and strengthen American democracy and self-government. Clements is the author of Corporations Are Not People (2012).

Links to the past 2013 Illahee lectures broadcast on KBOO

http://illahee.org/

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 04/24/13

Air date: 
Wed, 04/24/2013 - 7:00pm - 8:00pm
Short Description: 
2013 Illahee Lecutre, Who Owns Our Economy with Catherine Austin Fitts

Live, on location broadcast of the 2013 Illahee Lecture Series. Tonight, hear Catherine Austin Fitts on Who Owns Our Economy?

In 2013, the Illahee Lectures are looking into who influences, controls, and owns other key aspects of our lives:  what we eat, the information we access, the environment, our own finances,  and our politicians? In short, who owns us? And what can we do about it?

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 04/22/13

Categories:
Air date: 
Mon, 04/22/2013 - 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Short Description: 
Earth Day Special

We hear Radio Ecoshock with host Alex Smith

Canadian scientist Paul Beckwith explains how the Arctic warming emergency is changing your weather. But first, the story of an anti-pipeline media warrior, John Bolenbaugh in his own words. The leaks, scandals and deaths behind Tar Sands pipelines. 

http://www.ecoshock.org/

 

Special Programming: Public Affairs on 04/22/13

Air date: 
Mon, 04/22/2013 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Short Description: 
Paul Roland interviews activist and author John Stauber on politics and the environmental movement.

Paul Roland interviews John Stauber, long-time activist, investigative reporter and author. They discuss Stauber's beginnings and history as an activist, from protesting the Viet Nam war and organizing a teach-in at his high school on the first Earth Day in 1970, to fighting herbicide spraying in the National Forests and against genetically modified growth hormones for cows, to exposing government and industry propaganda.

Audio

Food Justice And The Civil Rights Movement a Know your City and People's Coop Panel

program date: 
Mon, 01/18/2016
On Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Know Your City and People’s Food Co-op are hosting a community dialogue with speakers who organize for food justice and racial justice in our local community. Topics include gentrification, displacement, culturally responsive food gardens, and equity in local food policy.
 
Speakers include: Jamilah Bourdon, Edward Hill,  Shannon Cogan, Shantae Johnson, and Nick Sauvie.
 

From Civil Rights to Human Rights
An Oregon farmer from the Chicago projects
White guilt
Black guilt
Brown University guilt
Long term struggle and 
Love is a powerful ally 

Thirsty for Justice: The Struggle for the Human Right to Water

program date: 
Mon, 09/28/2015
Like the residents of Hood River County opposed to a planned Nestle water bottling plant in Cascade Locks, local activists in Mount Shasta, just south of the Oregon border, are trying to stop a Crystal Geyser bottling operation from opening in their community. A growing movement to stop the corporate takeover of water resources is coming together regionally, nationally and internationally. In the Pacific Northwest, activists are working towards a regional water alliance to share experience, energy and resources to stop new water bottling plants from opening up.

Paul Roland interviewed Vicky Gold, of Water Flows Free, a Mount Shasta resident who is helping organize an event on Saturday, September 26 featuring a full line-up of speakers and musicians. She has years of experience from fighting Nestle's attempt to open a plant in Mccloud, not far from Mt. Shasta, and offers a valuable perspective on the situation in Northern California.

Facebook page for the Mt. Shasta event: https://www.facebook.com/events/885213588216127/

Articles:
http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-shasta-bottled-water-20150510-story.html
http://www.mtshastanews.com/article/20150325/NEWS/150329822
http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/Crystal-Geyser-to-tap-Siskiyou-County-groundwater-6253314.php
http://www.triplepundit.com/topic/bottled-water-vs-tap-water/
 

  • Length: 17:32 minutes (16.05 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

'Nchee Wana Fishing People Against Nestle, Part 2

program date: 
Wed, 09/16/2015
150 to 200 tribal fishing people and Oregon residents gathered yesterday on the
120 tribal member, Gorge residents, and concerned citizens rallied in Salem calling on Gov. Kate Brown to protect Oregon's water from Nestlé.

120 tribal member, Gorge residents, and concerned citizens rallied in Salem calling on Gov. Kate Brown to protect Oregon’s water from Nestlé.

State Capitol steps to urge Governor Kate Brown to protect Oregon’s water, fish and communities from a water grab that would allow Nestlé to profit from bottling the public’s water in the Columbia River Gorge.

Last month, a five-day fast by Anna Mae Leonard helped galvanize a movement within the Warms Springs and three other Columbia River tribes. Leonard organized the rally as a platform for tribal members who depend on the Columbia River for sustenance fishing of wild salmon. Together, the tribes are taking a stand and demanding that the State of Oregon respect tribal fishing rights and put a stop to a Nestlé’s water grab in the Gorge.

“The Cascade Mountains have always been our home; we are still here,” said Warm Springs Chief Johnny Jackson. “Most importantly, is that spring: we were always taught, when we were young, to have great respect and care of our springs of the mountains. It is a part of us and we are a part of it. It is not for us to give away. It’s spiritual and sacred to our people. The White man calls it a usable resource and that’s all it is to them.”

The rally and Leonard’s fasting protest in August came after the Warm Springs Tribal Council sent a letter to Governor Kate Brown expressing their concern over both the idea of Nestlé bottling Columbia Gorge spring water, and the process the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has undertaken to make that water available to the multinational corporation. Warms Springs Tribal Council member Carlos Smith said “the Tribal Council unanimously voted yes to send a letter to both Governor Kate Brown and the City of Cascade Locks opposing to the water rights swap for Nestlé’s water bottling proposal.” The letter stated that the Tribe was not adequately involved in the process and that they view the State-led water rights swap as a threat to a water source sacred to their people.

Hundreds of tribal members agree with Leonard’s sentiments that, “The Transfer of water rights, inherently violates the Treaty of 1855 between the United States and the Four Columbia River Tribes.” The Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife’s application to swap water rights with the City of Cascade Locks would make public and tribal water resources available to Nestlé; it sets a dangerous precedent for future water resources in Hood River County and the state. “The tribes are supposed to have Senior Water Rights,” said Skeweacuks a Warm Springs tribal member. “We have to have enough water to sustain the fish species; the salmon runs.”

Fed up with the State’s process to make public water resources available to a multinational corporation, Wilbur Slockish, a Klickitat Chief said, “The People, the salmon and our natural food supply – we are trying to survive your economic policies. We are tired of being the invisible people.”

Alongside the dozens of tribal fishing people, local residents and representatives of local and statewide groups spoke and delivered over quarter million petitions to Governor Kate Brown’s office. The Local Water AllianceFood & Water Watchand Bark, a watchdog group for the Mt. Hood National Forest, delivered some 4,000 petitions and letters to the Governor while the SumOfUs campaign delivered 251,963 petitions signatures from across the globe calling on Governor Kate Brown to protect Oregon’s water from Nestlé.

For more information:
https://keepnestleout.wordpress.com/
https://www.facebook.com/events/884669421580265/
http://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/water/bottled/
http://bark-out.org/project/nestle-water-bottling-proposal
http://www.critfc.org/

  • Length: 62:21 minutes (85.62 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 192Kbps (CBR)

'Nchee Wana Fishing People Against Nestle, Part 1

program date: 
Wed, 09/16/2015
150 to 200 tribal fishing people and Oregon residents gathered yesterday on the
120 tribal member, Gorge residents, and concerned citizens rallied in Salem calling on Gov. Kate Brown to protect Oregon's water from Nestlé.

120 tribal member, Gorge residents, and concerned citizens rallied in Salem calling on Gov. Kate Brown to protect Oregon’s water from Nestlé.

State Capitol steps to urge Governor Kate Brown to protect Oregon’s water, fish and communities from a water grab that would allow Nestlé to profit from bottling the public’s water in the Columbia River Gorge.

Last month, a five-day fast by Anna Mae Leonard helped galvanize a movement within the Warms Springs and three other Columbia River tribes. Leonard organized the rally as a platform for tribal members who depend on the Columbia River for sustenance fishing of wild salmon. Together, the tribes are taking a stand and demanding that the State of Oregon respect tribal fishing rights and put a stop to a Nestlé’s water grab in the Gorge.

“The Cascade Mountains have always been our home; we are still here,” said Warm Springs Chief Johnny Jackson. “Most importantly, is that spring: we were always taught, when we were young, to have great respect and care of our springs of the mountains. It is a part of us and we are a part of it. It is not for us to give away. It’s spiritual and sacred to our people. The White man calls it a usable resource and that’s all it is to them.”

The rally and Leonard’s fasting protest in August came after the Warm Springs Tribal Council sent a letter to Governor Kate Brown expressing their concern over both the idea of Nestlé bottling Columbia Gorge spring water, and the process the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has undertaken to make that water available to the multinational corporation. Warms Springs Tribal Council member Carlos Smith said “the Tribal Council unanimously voted yes to send a letter to both Governor Kate Brown and the City of Cascade Locks opposing to the water rights swap for Nestlé’s water bottling proposal.” The letter stated that the Tribe was not adequately involved in the process and that they view the State-led water rights swap as a threat to a water source sacred to their people.

Hundreds of tribal members agree with Leonard’s sentiments that, “The Transfer of water rights, inherently violates the Treaty of 1855 between the United States and the Four Columbia River Tribes.” The Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife’s application to swap water rights with the City of Cascade Locks would make public and tribal water resources available to Nestlé; it sets a dangerous precedent for future water resources in Hood River County and the state. “The tribes are supposed to have Senior Water Rights,” said Skeweacuks a Warm Springs tribal member. “We have to have enough water to sustain the fish species; the salmon runs.”

Fed up with the State’s process to make public water resources available to a multinational corporation, Wilbur Slockish, a Klickitat Chief said, “The People, the salmon and our natural food supply – we are trying to survive your economic policies. We are tired of being the invisible people.”

Alongside the dozens of tribal fishing people, local residents and representatives of local and statewide groups spoke and delivered over quarter million petitions to Governor Kate Brown’s office. The Local Water AllianceFood & Water Watchand Bark, a watchdog group for the Mt. Hood National Forest, delivered some 4,000 petitions and letters to the Governor while the SumOfUs campaign delivered 251,963 petitions signatures from across the globe calling on Governor Kate Brown to protect Oregon’s water from Nestlé.

For more information:
https://keepnestleout.wordpress.com/
https://www.facebook.com/events/884669421580265/
http://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/water/bottled/
http://bark-out.org/project/nestle-water-bottling-proposal
http://www.critfc.org/

 

Max Blumenthal speaks to KBOO about 'The 51-Day war'

program date: 
Wed, 07/01/2015
Last summer, during the 51 days of conflict that began when Israel launched air strikes on Hamas-controlled Gaza, journalist Max Blumenthal was embedded on the ground. His reportage followed the fighting and the deaths of more than 2,000 people, most of whom were Palestinian civilians, in what he called an "entirely avoidable catastrophe." In his new book, The 51 Day War: Ruin and Resistance in Gaza, Blumenthal explores the conditions and deceptions that led to war.
  • Length: 10:50 minutes (9.91 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Mauna Kea protests continue

program date: 
Thu, 04/23/2015
A four-week long protest which has halted construction of  the proposed TMT or Thirty Meter Telescope on Mauna Kea on the big island of Hawaii continues with several new developments this week.
On Tuesday activists took to the streets of Honolulu to bring their message to the centers of state and commercial power in the archipelago.
The thirty-meter telescope would be housed in a massive eighteen-story high structure atop the highest mountain in Hawaii.
It’s a project of the TMT Observatory Corporation, a joint venture of Institutions  from the United States, Canada, China, India and Japan.
There are already thirteen other telescopes sited on the mountain, which have also drawn opposition  from Native Hawaiians and environmentalists.
But this new, massive telescope has drawn the largest opposition to date.
Some 200 people continue to camp out on Mauna Kea and are drawing increased attention in Hawaii, on the continental United States and internationally.
A moratorium put in place three weeks ago by the company in response to the opposition has been extended twice.
This afternoon, the Board of trustees of the Office of hawaiian affairs, which had signed off on the project in 2012, had an emotional meeting to discuss the controversy, with  trustees speaking out strongly on both sides of the issue.
they plan to meet again on april 30 to fully discuss the issue and apparently will revisit their earlier decision.
On Wednesday Talk Radio http://kboo.fm/whythemountainastruggleforautonomydignit0, Paul Roland talked with Native Hawaiian filmmaker, journalist and activist Keala Kelly about the evolving situation.
Earlier  today he spoke with one of the Mauna Kea protestors, Kahookahi  Kanuha, who had come down from the encampment on Mauna Kea and travelled to Oahu for the protest on Tuesday.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott tries to keep rising sea at bay by not letting state employees talk about it

program date: 
Thu, 03/19/2015
As south Florida begins to sink below rising sea levels, the Governor Scott administration appears to be building a wall to protect itself from damaging information about the role that climate change is actually having.  His offices in Tallahassee, located somewhat inland, appear to be safe for now from harsh reality. 
Florida appears to be on the dangerous cutting edge of  denialism and the suppression of inconvenient truth. A climate of fear, insecurity and stasis seems to pervade agencies charged with environmental protection and regulation.
In this complete version of an interview done by Paul Roland for the KBOO News on March 18, we hear about the case of a Florida state employee who was reprimanded and put on unpaid leave for two days for speaking publicly about climate change. Roland interviews Jerry Phillips, Director of the Florida office of Public Employees for Environmental responsibility (PEER).
Barton Bibler is a long-time Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) employee who serves as Land Management Plan Coordinator in the Division of State Lands.
When attending a public hearing, Bibler was directed by his superiors to remove any hot button issues, especially references to climate change.
He was then given a letter of reprimand for supposedly misrepresenting that the “official meeting agenda included climate change.”
The employee was suspended for two days and then given a “Medical Release Form” requiring that his doctor supply his boss with an evaluation of unspecified “medical condition and behavior” issues before being allowed to return to work.
On March 18, PEER sent a letter asking the Florida state government to open an investigation into how Bibler was handled.

More information: http://www.peer.org/news/news-releases/2015/03/18/scott%E2%80%99s-climate-change-gag-order-claims-a-victim/

Pasco’s Consejo Latino Leader Calls for DOJ Investigation in #PascoShooting

program date: 
Mon, 02/16/2015

From Latino Rebels website http://www.latinorebels.com/2015/02/16/pascos-consejo-latino-leader-calls-for-doj-investigation-in-pascoshooting/:

Last night, Latino Rebels Radio discussed the shooting death of Antonio Zambrano-Montes in Pasco, Washington, with leaders of Pasco’s Consejo Latino. Rick Rios, Gabriel Portugal and Felix Vargas joined the show to share the latest about a story that has gotten national and international attention. In addition, Eddie De La Cruz of Oregon added insights as to how his community had begun to change community relationships with law enforcement, a model being followed by Consejo Latino. A lot was discussed last night —including more about Zambrano-Montes, his family’s reaction, Saturday’s march and one the previous record of one of the Pasco officers involved in the shooting— so you can hear the entire show below.
  • Length: 60:28 minutes (27.68 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 64Kbps (CBR)

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz on KPFA's "Letters and Politics" program (not yet aired on KBOO)

program date: 
Mon, 02/09/2015
Radical Indigenous movement activist, feminist and scholar Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz talks about her powerful new book, An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States. The book reframes United States history from the perspective of the Indigenous peoples who were living here for millenia before the arrival of Europeans. For those who haven't yet made or attempted this perceptual and conceptual shift, her book  can serve as a valuable aid and guide. Now more than ever we need to radically re-examine the flawed and unjust foundations upon which this nation-state was built and continues to be maintained.

From the book's Introduction: "Writing US history from an Indigenous peoples' perspective requires rethinking the consensual national narrative. That narrative is wrong or deficient, not in its facts, dates, or details but rather in its essence. Inherent in the myth we've been taught is an embrace of settler colonialism and genocide. The myth persists, not for a lack of free speech or poverty of information but rather for an absence of motivation to ask questions that challenge the core of the scripted narrative of the origin story. How might acknowledging the reality of US history work to transform society? that is the central question this book pursues."

"This may well be the most important US history book you will read in your lifetime."--Robin D.G. Kelley, Freedom Dreams: The Black Radical Imagination

"An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States is a fiercely honest, unwavering, and unprecedented statement, one which has never been attempted by any other historian or intellectual."--Simon Ortiz, Poet and Professor of English and American Indian Studies, Arizona State University

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz grew up in rural Oklahoma, the daughter of a tenant farmer and part-Indian mother. She has been active in the international Indigenous movement for over four decades. From 1967 to 1974, she was a full-time activist living in various parts of the United States, traveling to Europe, Mexico, and Cuba. She is also a veteran of the women's liberation movement. Outlaw Woman: Memoir of the War Years outlines this time of her life, chronicling the years 1960-1975. After receiving her PhD in history at UCLA, she taught in the newly established Native American Studies Program at Cal State, Hayward, and helped found the departments of Ethnic Studies and Women's Studies. Her 1977 book The Great Sioux Nation was the fundamental document at the first international conference on Indigenous peoples at the United Nations in Geneva. She is the author or editor of seven other books, including Roots of Resistance: A History of Land Tenure in New Mexico. She lives in San Francisco.

See her website: http://www.reddirtsite.com/ and for her book: http://www.beacon.org/An-Indigenous-Peoples-History-of-the-United-States-P1041.aspx
  • Length: 58:23 minutes (53.46 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

A forum on police unions and their role in the culture of police violence in the United States

program date: 
Wed, 02/04/2015

A KBOO Special Forum on Police Unions and their role in perpetuating a culture of police violence. This will be an in-depth look into the history, role and politics of police unions in the light of the post-Ferguson nation-wide uprising against police killings, abuse and impunity.

Three panel discussions hosted by Paul Roland will expore this issue from a variety of angles. First will be an overview of the history and role of police unions, going back to the early part of the 20th Century. Guests will include Joseph Slater, Professor of Law and Values at the University of Toledo College of Law (http://www.utoledo.edu/law/faculty/fulltime/slater.html) and Kristian Williams of Portland, author of Our Enemies in Blue: Police and Power in America http://www.kristianwilliams.com/.
The second panel will discuss the status and role of police unions from a labor perspective. Guests will includeJonathan Tasini, long-time labor activist in New York (http://www.workinglife.org/); Jamie Partridge, local community activist with the Letter Carriers' Union and Jobs with Justice; Ahjamu Umi, local activist with the All African Peoples' Revolutionary Party and union organizer http://www.abetterworld.me/me.html.
The third panel will look at police accountability/reform/abolition, citzen review and oversight and alternatives to policing. Guests will include Flint Taylor, long-time people's attorney with the People's Law Office in Chicago (http://peopleslawoffice.com/about-civil-rights-lawyers/attorney-staff-bios/flint-taylor/Ashlee Albies, attorney with the National Lawyers' Guild and with the Albina Ministerial Alliance in their ongoing involvement with the Department of Justice Settlement Process stemming from their lawsuit against the Portland Police Bureau http://www.civilrightspdx.com/?attorney=6;Teressa Raiford of Don't Shoot Portland https://www.facebook.com/DontShootPDXAhjamu Umi 

Further reading on these issues:

 
 
 
http://www.buzzfeed.com/evanmcsan/organized-labor-ferguson#.wizej3r1YB

https://www.jacobinmag.com/2014/01/the-bad-kind-of-unionism/

http://colorlines.com/archives/2014/10/organized_labor_takes_on_race_and_michael_brown.html

http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2014/12/how-police-unions-keep-abusive-cops-on-the-street/383258/

http://www.thenation.com/blog/194537/police-unions-dont-serve-people-can-labor-movement-force-them

http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2014/12/22/police-unions-havealwaysbeenalabormovementapart.html

http://www.buzzfeed.com/evanmcsan/organized-labor-ferguson#.pvWYyq8Yy

http://lawcha.org/wordpress/2014/12/29/stop-kidding-police-created-control-working-class-poor-people/

http://www.blackagendareport.com/node/14591

http://socialistworker.org/2014/12/16/armed-occupation-inside-the-empire

http://newpol.org/content/teachers-unions-police-and-real-new-civil-rights-movement

http://www.buzzfeed.com/jacobfischler/police-demilitarization-pits-police-union-against-top-labor#.vb54Zd04Z

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2015/01/29/1360927/-Jeff-Roorda-St-Louis-Police-Union-spokesman-wearing-Darren-Wilson-bracelet-assaults-cuts-woman

https://worxintheory.wordpress.com/2014/12/07/origins-of-the-police
 
To contact the host of this program, Paul Roland: paulakroland@gmail.com

 

 

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