Radiozine

Tune in to KBOO's Morning Radiozine for intriguing Public Affairs programming every Monday through Friday!

 

Coming Soon

David Rolf, President of SEIU 775 on the connections between economic and environmental health
 

Episode Archive

Radiozine on 05/29/09

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Radiozine
Air date: 
Fri, 05/29/2009 - 11:00am - 11:30am

Host Cris Andreae interviews Toby Hemenway about his updated classic, GAIA'S GARDEN: A Guide to Home-Scale Permaculture. Toby Hemenway is the author of the first major North American book on permaculture, Gaia's Garden: A Guide to Home-Scale Permaculture, and an adjunct professor at Portland State University. He is also Scholar in Residence at Pacific University. His current project is developing urban sustainability resources in Portland, where he now lives. He teaches permaculture and consults and lectures on ecological design throughout the country.

Radiozine on 05/28/09

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Program: 
Radiozine
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Thu, 05/28/2009 - 11:30am - 12:00pm

Students from the Pulse of Portland Music Project at Renaissance Arts Academy on the Marshall Campus will be on KBOO to share their work from the year. Listen in on how they feel about music, school culture & some of the interviews they have performed with various artists from our hip town. Part 1 of 2. Hear Part 2 tomorrow at 11:30AM.

Radiozine on 05/27/09

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Wed, 05/27/2009 - 11:30am - 12:00pm

Kate Welch hosts an interview and call-in with Mary Fetsch, TriMet Communications Director since 1995. 

Radiozine on 05/25/09

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Radiozine
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Mon, 05/25/2009 - 11:30am - 12:00pm

Pete Anderson hosts another in a series of programs honoring all living things, especially nonhuman beings.

Radiozine on 05/22/09

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Radiozine
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Fri, 05/22/2009 - 11:00am - 11:30am

Todd Wilson hosts a round-table discussion with representatives from Free Geek, the Red and Black Cafe, and City Bikes. They'll discuss how their business runs and how they interact with their community. City Bikes and the Red and Black Cafe are worker owned cooperatives and Free Geek is volunteer-based non-profit organization.

 

Radiozine

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Radiozine
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Thu, 05/21/2009 - 11:30am - 12:00pm

Host Michelle Schroeder Fletcher interviews Russell Leigh Sharman and Cheryl Harris Sharman, authors of Nightshift NYC. In the book they tell the stories of New York City nightshift workers. This ethnography of the night investigates familiar sites, such as diners, delis and taxis, as well as some unexpected corners of the night, such as a walking tour of homelessness in Manhattan and a fishing boat out of Brooklyn. The Sharmans show how the nightshift is more than simply out of phase, it is another social space altogether, highly structured, inherently subversive, and shot through with inequalities of power. NIGHTSHIFT presents the narratives of those who sleep too little and work too much, revealing the soul of a city hidden in the graveyard shift of 24-hour commerce when the sun goes down and the lights come up.

Radiozine

Program: 
Radiozine
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Mon, 05/11/2009 - 11:30am - 12:00pm

Host Marianne Barisonek speaks with Peter Ward, author of "The Medea Hypothesis: Is Life on Earth Ultimately Self-Destructive?" Peter Ward will be speaking about his work tonight, Monday, May 11, 2009 at 07:30 PM at Powell's City of Books on Burnside.

In The Medea Hypothesis, renowned paleontologist Peter Ward proposes a revolutionary and provocative vision of life's relationship with the Earth's biosphere--one that has frightening implications for our future, yet also offers hope. Using the latest discoveries from the geological record, he argues that life might be its own worst enemy. This stands in stark contrast to James Lovelock's Gaia hypothesis--the idea that life sustains habitable conditions on Earth. In answer to Gaia, which draws on the idea of the "good mother" who nurtures life, Ward invokes Medea, the mythical mother who killed her own children. Could life by its very nature threaten its own existence?

Radiozine

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Fri, 05/08/2009 - 11:30am - 12:00pm

Host Marianne Barisonek speaks with producers of the film "Good Food"Good Food introduces us to the farmers, ranchers, stores and restaurants that are building a more sustainable food system. The film captures the beautiful rural landscapes and spectacular bounty from the high deserts of eastern Oregon to the lush, fertile valleys of the Pacific coast. It introduces us to the leaders who are bringing good food to tables across the region, including New Seasons, Country Natural Beef and Burgerville.

Radiozine on 05/08/09

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Fri, 05/08/2009 - 11:00am - 11:30am

 

Host Marianne Barisonek speaks with Brad Friedman of the Restore Justice At Justice Campaign.

Broad Coalition Of Organizations And Individuals Launches “Restore Justice At Justice” Campaign

The Campaign Demands Redress For Those Politically Prosecuted Under Bush Administration, Beginning With Governor Don Siegelman And Paul Minor.

Radiozine on 05/04/09

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Mon, 05/04/2009 - 11:30am - 12:00pm

Stephanie Potter hosts a special interview with Dr. Larry Dossey, a physician who is deeply rooted in the scientific world and has become an internationally influential advocate of the role of the mind in health and the role of spirituality in healthcare. He discusses his latest book, "The Power of Premonitions: How Knowing the Future Can Shape Our Lives." Dr. Dossey discusses the human capacity for knowing the future. He says experiments consistently show that human beings are as wired to know what's coming next as we are to see, feel, hear and think. Dossey uses cutting-edge science to show readers how to cultivate their natural abilities.

Audio

Itafari Foundation

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Radiozine
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Thu, 05/31/2012

Vicky Trabosh, co-founder of the Itafari Foundation talks about a fundraiser Friday, June 1st, for this local nonprofit organization that works to help communities in Rwanda.

The event, Building Hope and a School Brick by Brick is Friday, June 1st at 7PM (Doors open at 6) at World Forestry Center, Miller Hall with desserts, drinks, music and Rwandan dancers.

Vicky Trabosh took a trip 7 years ago that changed her life. Seeing the people of Rwanda living on 1 dollar a day without complaining, and all that they have suffered in their past inspired Vicky. She started her own nonprofit and named it Itafari, meaning brick in Rwanda language. She has started several programs to help the community, families, children and women and is now building a high school.

http://www.itafari.org

Fresh Start offers free education on natural health topics

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Radiozine
program date: 
Wed, 05/23/2012

Americans have a lower life expectancy rate, higher rates of heart disease and cancer, and an infant mortality rate that is twice as high as other rich industrialized nations. With the intention of restoring "the nation to natural optimum health," a nonprofit health organization Fresh Start, was recently founded here in Portland to provide free education to the public on natural health topics. "We believe that America's health crisis can be turned around, and we can do that through making the best information available to the people."

With host Stephanie Potter, join co-founders Robert Gordon, Jr., Fresh Start manager; Amy Rutherford-Close, Certified Personal Trainer/Sports Nutritionist; Michael Hunter Fitness Enthusiast/Patient Advocate, and find out what they're up to. 

"The Great Divergence: America's Growing Inequality Crisis and What We Can Do about It"

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Radiozine
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Fri, 05/18/2012
Host Michelle Schroeder Fletcher speaks with Timothy Noah, author of "The Great Divergence: America's Growing Inequality Crisis and What We Can Do about It."

For the past three decades, America has steadily become a nation of haves and have-nots. We have less equality of income than Venezuela, Kenya, or Yemen.

In "The Great Divergence", Timothy Noah explains not only how the Great Divergence has come about, but why it threatens American democracy—and most important, how we can begin to reverse it.

 

 

 

 

Klamath Basin Refuge - water conflicts and bird die-offs

program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Mon, 04/30/2012

Hosted by Stephanie Potter

Most of the lakes and marshes of the Lower Klamath were drained for agriculture nearly 100 years ago, but the Klamath Basin National Wildlife Refuge in Southern Oregon and Northern California is still the most important waterfowl habitat on the Pacific Flyway. However, last month 10,000 or more birds died there from overcrowding as a result of a water cut-off by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. This was the biggest die-off in a decade. The refuge is last in line for water, behind farmers and endangered fish, and as global warming heats up, scarce water supplies are likely to become even scarcer.

Tune in and join the discussion as a representative from the US Fish and Wildlife Service provides an initial overview, and then host Stephanie Potter is joined by Steve Pedery of Oregon Wild and Jim McCarthy of WaterWatch to talk about the issues and what needs to be done.

 
 
 

 

Klamath Wildlife Refuges -- for the birds?

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Radiozine
program date: 
Mon, 04/30/2012

Most of the lakes and marshes of the Klamath Basin were "reclaimed" and drained for agriculture nearly 100 years ago--only 20% remain, but the Klamath Basin National Wildlife Refuge Complex on the Oregon/California border, is still the most important waterfowl habitat on the Pacific Flyway. However, last month over 10,000 birds died there from overcrowding as a result of a water cut-off by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. This was the biggest die-off in a decade. The refuges there are last in line for water, behind farmers and endangered fish, and as global warming heats up, scarce water supplies are likely to become even scarcer.  Matt Braun, spokesperson for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) provides an initial overview, and then host Stephanie Potter is joined by Steve Pedery of Oregon Wild and Jim  McCarthy  of WaterWatch.

(Unique among the more than 500 wildlife refuges in the National Wildlife Refuge System, the USFWS allows broad-scale commercial agriculture within the Tule Lake and Lower Klamath refuges that provides no benefit to wildlife. View interactive maps here to see how the Klamath Basin has been altered by development.)

CALIFORNIA 90420, a documentary on Oaksterdam University

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Radiozine
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Fri, 04/27/2012

Host Jay Thiemeyer interviews filmmaker Dean Shull about his new documentary CALIFORNIA 90420 which  looks at Oaksterdam University, the nation's only college preparing students for work in the medical marijuana industry. The film shows at the Clinton Street Theater in Portland starting Friday, April 27th.

90420 focuses on the rapidly open and growing marijuana trade in the State of California. The film explores the burgeoning 'above ground' industry through the eyes of four, 20-something characters whose real lives are caught up in the changing green landscape.

The film follows faculty and students at California's Oaksterdam University, the nation's first college to prepare students for careers in the ever changing marijuana industry and the epicenter of legalization efforts in California. Recently federal agents from the DEA and IRS raided Oaksterdam University as well as the home of Oaksterdam University Founder, Richard Lee. Although medical marijuana is legal in California, it is still prohibited under federal law, leaving Oaksterdam in a precarious legal limbo.

CALIFORNIA 90420 is a New Coast Productions Film directed by Dean Shull (Waiting...) and produced and written by Dean Shull, Steve Roberts and Colin Goldman. The film features Dale Sky Jones and Oaksterdam co-founders Richard Lee and Jeff Jones.

For more information on CALIFORNIA 90420, including a complete list of theaters showing the film, please visit: www.90420.com.

Clinton Street Theater, Portland

4-27 @7pm, 9pm

4-28 @7pm, 9pm

4-29 @7pm, 9pm

4-30 @7pm, 9pm

5-1 @7pm, 9pm

5-2 @7pm, 9pm

5-3 @7pm, 9pm

 

  • Length: 25:15 minutes (23.12 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

The Developmental Origins of Obesity

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Radiozine
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Mon, 04/23/2012

 Health and Health Care Forum

Host Roberta Hall presents Dr. Jerrold Heindel, a scientist at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences in North Carolina. He spoke about the Developmental Origins of Obesity at the Northwest Environmental Health conference.

Radiozine

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Radiozine
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Fri, 04/20/2012

 Dan Johnson interviews Mya Chamberlin and Glen Ulmer about the upcoming 4th annual Gay & Grey Expo 2012, taking place at Friendly House on Saturday May 12th from 9am til 4pm.

  • Length: 27:47 minutes (25.44 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Larry Merculieff on indigenous elder wisdom and modern day personal to global challenges.

program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Thu, 04/19/2012

Host Michelle Schroeder Fletcher interviews Larry Merculieff who is won of the presenters at the Earth and Spirit Council's Earthday Conference this Friday, April 20th and Saturday, April 21st.

Larry Merculieff has almost four decades of experience serving his people, the Aleuts of the Pribilof Islands and other Alaska Native peoples in a number of capacities. His reach has been broad and varied—a few of the positions he’s held include: City Manager of St. Paul Island, Commissioner of the Alaska Department of Commerce and Economic Development, President and CEO of Tanadgusix Corporation, Chairman of the Board of The Aleut Corporation, and General Manager of the Central Bering Sea Fishermen’s Association (one of the six Community Development Quota groups created by Congress to receive fish allocations in Alaska).

From 2000–2003, Merculieff served as the Director of the Department of Public Policy and Advocacy in the Rural Alaska Community Action Program. As Director, Merculieff led the largest subsistence rights march in Alaska’s history and emceed the subsistence rally after the march. The march was instrumental in protecting Alaska Native subsistence rights.

Merculieff has helped found and lead numerous environmental organizations. He has also won numerous awards for his work. In 2007 he received the Buffet Finalist Award for Indigenous Leadership, and the Alaska Forum on the Environment Award for Environmental Excellence, for lifetime achievements in environment.

Close to Merculieff’s heart are issues related to cultural and community wellness, traditional ways of living, Elder wisdom, and the environment. Having had a traditional upbringing, Merculieff has been, and continues to be, a strong voice advocating the meaningful application of traditional knowledge and wisdom obtained from Elders.

  • Length: 29:09 minutes (26.69 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Duane Elgin on Great Transition Stories for Earth Day and Beyond

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Radiozine
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Wed, 04/18/2012

We live in a time of converging crises -- climate change, financial disruption, energy shortages, species extinctions, the list goes on. "Life as usual" is on the verge of implosion. How do we enter this new era? How can we make sense of it? Visionary author and speaker, Duane Elgin acknowledges the threats, and yet speaks of hope. He points to trends in society and science that can help us to see an even bigger picture, what he calls "our larger story as a human family." Duane shares how a radical shift to sustainability and community is at hand if we can embrace the Great Transition Stories that could help us to become consciously transformed by the challenges of our time. Hosted by Stephanie Potter.

Duane will be presenting a workshop Our World in Transition at the Earth Day Conference 2012: for the Next Seven Generations, which is being offered by the Earth and Spirit Council in partnership with the Sylvania Campus of Portland Community College. KBOO is a proud co-sponsor of the Earth Day 2012 Conference & Celebration.

Friday, April 20 – At 6 p.m. in the Performing Arts Center there will be an evening fund raiser for the Earth and Spirit Council. Entrance is $5 for PCC students. Besides Duane Elgin, speakers include Grandmother Agnes Pilgrim, oldest living member of the Takelma Indians of Southern Oregon and world-renowned spiritual leader.

Saturday, April 21 – From 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. it’s the Sylvania Campus Earth Day Conference. Free for students, the conference features 24 workshops and speakers including Kim Smith, environmental sociologist. Other presenters include: John Kallas, North American authority on edible plants; Peter Michael Bauer, founder of ReWild Portland; and Sean Cruz, co-founder of Friends of Celilo Falls.

Duane Elgin's books include Voluntary SimplicityThe Living UniversePromise Ahead, and Awakening Earth. In 2006, Duane received the international “Goi Peace Award” in recognition of his contribution to a global “vision, consciousness, and lifestyle” that fosters a “more sustainable and spiritual culture.

Comments

Correction

 A typo occured with one of our guests, Todd Dalotto on Radiozine this past Friday. Our apologies for the oversight.

 

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