Radiozine

Tune in to KBOO's Morning Radiozine for intriguing Public Affairs programming every Monday through Friday!

 

Coming Soon

Founder Hank Patton & students discuss stewardship learning at World Steward in the Columbia Gorge
Moms Demand Action and Promoting Health and Safety and Measures to Keep Children Safe from Violence
 

Episode Archive

Nick Turse, author of "Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam"

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Fri, 01/31/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
Nick Turse, author of "Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam"

Host Per Fagereng interviews Nick Turse, author of "Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam"  about US war crimes during the war in Viet Nam.
Nick Turse is an award-winning journalist, historian, essayist, the managing editor of TomDispatch.com, the co-founder of Dispatch Books, and a fellow at the Nation Institute.

Nick Turse speaks at Powell's City of Books on Friday, January 31st at 7: 30PM.

http://www.nickturse.com/

OSU Divest and the Faculty Senate Approval of Resolution for Divestment of Fossil Fuel Stocks

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Wed, 01/29/2014 - 11:00am - 11:30am
Short Description: 
OSU Divest and the Faculty Senate Approval of Resolution for Divestment of Fossil Fuel Stocks

Oregon State University Divestment

Roberta Hall hosts a feature on the success of OSU Divest in obtaining Faculty Senate approval of a resolution asking the OSU Foundation to divest of fossil fuel stocks and the student government's role in continuing to develop the momentum for divestment.  Jesse Pettibone, OSU sophomore, talks with Roberta about student involvement. We hear the case for divestment made by Ken Winograd, the faculty member who chairs the OSU Divest Committee, and three other faculty members; Mike O'Malley, Cora Borradaile and Richard Clinton.

Photo above Jesse Pettibone; Photo below Ken Winograd.

Health Impacts of Environmental Hazards Such as Toxins with Laurel Kincl

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Mon, 01/27/2014 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Health Impacts of Environmental Hazards Such as Toxins

Health and Health Care Forum 

Host Roberta Hall speaks with Laurel Kincl, who directs the Outreach and Engagement core of OSU's Environmental Health Science Center. The conversation centers on the interdisciplinary research the Center conducts to determine the health impacts of environmental hazards, such as toxins, and this Center's connections to other research across the country. Laurel Kincl is shown above.

Historian Nathaniel Philbrick on His Book "Why Read Moby-Dick?"

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Thu, 01/16/2014 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Historian Nathaniel Philbrick on His Book "Why Read Moby-Dick?"

Host Gene Bradley interviews historian Nathaniel Philbrick about his book "Why Read Moby-Dick?" 

Moby-Dick is perhaps the greatest of the Great American Novels, yet its length and esoteric subject matter create an aura of difficulty that too often keeps readers at bay. In his National Book Award- winning bestseller, "In the Heart of the Sea," Nathaniel Philbrick unpacked the story of the wreck of the whaleship Essex, the real-life incident that inspired Melville to write Moby- Dick. Now, he sets his sights on the fiction itself, offering a cabin master’s tour of a spellbinding novel rich with adventure and history.

The Physiology, Sociology and Politics of compassion.

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Mon, 01/13/2014 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Scholars' Circle Panel on Compassion

From the series Scholars' Circle we feature a panel discussion looking at the physiology, sociology and politics of compassion. 
Featured speakers include Iain Wilkinson, Sociology, University of Kent; Paul Gilbert, Clinical Psychology, University of Derby; James Doty, founder, Director of the Center for Compassion & Altruism Research and Education.

Journalist Mirta Ojito on her book Hunting Season: Immigration and Murder in an All-American Town

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Fri, 01/03/2014 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Journalist Mirta Ojito on her book Hunting Season: Immigration and Murder in an All-American Town

Host Sarika Mehta interviews journalist and author Mirta Ojito about her most recent book Hunting Season: Immigration and Murder in an All-American Town, In November of 2008, which looks at the case of Marcelo Lucero, a 
thirty-seven-year-old undocumented Ecuadorean immigrant, was brutally attacked and murdered by a group of teenagers as he walked the streets of Patchogue, a quiet Long Island town. 

Fukushima/Hanford nuclear panel, Part 2

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Mon, 12/30/2013 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Fukushima/Hanford nuclear panel, Part 2

This morning we will hear part one of a two-part series on Fukushima, Hanford and the Columbia Generating station.  This is the question and answer section of a panel discussion recorded on December 10th, 2013 here in Portland.
Listen to part one here: http://kboo.fm/content/fukushimahanfordnuclearpanelpart1

Fukushima/Hanford nuclear panel, Part 1

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Fri, 12/27/2013 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Fukushima/Hanford nuclear panel, Part 1

This morning we will hear part one of a two-part series on Fukushima, Hanford and the Columbia Generating station. This is a panel discussion recorded on December 10th, 2013 here in Portland.
The Speakers you will hear today are: Miriam German of Radcast.org - introducing the panel
Lloyd Marbet - anti-nulcear activist
John Bertucci of the Fukushima Response campaign
Dan Serres of Columbia Riverkeeper
Chuck Johnson of Physicians for Social Responsibility
and Malcolm Chaddock with Portland Veterans for Peace and No Nukes Northwest

Part 2 of this program will air on Monday, December 30th, at 11AM.
 

Health and Health Care Forum: Oregon Public Health Association, Part 3

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Mon, 12/23/2013 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Looking at health transformation and better integration of personal medical care and public health

Health and Health Care Forum: Oregon Public Health Association (OPHA) Part 3

Host Roberta Hall speaks with Lillian Shirley, as of December 1st, the Director of the Public Health division at the Oregon Health Authority. They discuss health transformation and ways to better integrate personal medical care with public health.

Later Roberta interviews several researchers about their posters at OPHA -- one concerning medical ethics in general and Physicians Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (POLST) in particular; one on public health work with the Hmong community in California; and one on public health education in Tanzania.

Salman Rushdie on his Memoir "Joseph Anton"

Program: 
Radiozine
Air date: 
Fri, 12/20/2013 - 11:00am - 11:45am
Short Description: 
Justin Miller interviews Salman Rushdie about his latest work, “Joseph Anton: A Memoir"

Host Justin Miller speaks with renowned author Salman Rushdie about his latest work, “Joseph Anton: A Memoir,” an intimate look at his life in hiding from death threats after the publication of “The Satanic Verses.” Mr. Rushdie talks about how he viewed the threats of radical fundamentalism against artists and art; his classic American immigration experience; and how Wikileaks, Manning, and Snowden fit into the global struggle for free speech.

Audio

Linda Neale on the Earth and Spirit Council and Grandmother Maria Alice

program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Mon, 11/22/2010

 Linda Neale on the Earth and Spirit Council and Grandmother Maria Alice

Host Sue Supriano interviews Linda Neale of the Earth and Spirit Council about their event with Grandmother Maria Alice Campos Freire on Tuesday, November 23, 2010, 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. She will be speaking on Our Sacred Planet, Our Sacred Mother: The Preservation of Spirit and Nature

The Natural Way-Indigenous Voices Speaker Series is to honor all traditions that value the earth. The Natural Way provides a forum for those who strive to preserve and enhance earth-based, sustainable living to share their traditions, knowledge and beliefs about the earth.”

Maria alice

Grandmother Maria Alice is a member of the International Council of 13 Indigenous Grandmothers that represent a global alliance of prayer, education and healing for our Mother Earth and all her inhabitants. One of the Council's goals is to “. . protect our diverse cultures: lands, medicines, language and ceremonial ways of prayer through projects that educate and nurture our children.” Addressing the Grandmothers Council for the first time, Grandmother Maria Alice Campos Freire said, “I believe we have all been guided to be here and we will be guided to do what we came here to do. We cannot say we are of this race or that one. We have all been everything in our many lives, and now our paths cross for us to connect from many different faiths and cultures. But we are all the same flame in life.”

 

Harold McGee and Keys to Good Cooking: A Guide to Making the Best of Food and Recipes.

Categories:
program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Mon, 11/15/2010

 Hosted by Eugene Bradley

Host Eugene Bradley interviews Harold McGee, noted food expert and award-winning author of the culinary bible "On Food and Cooking" and "The Curious Cook" column in The New York Times. They discuss McGee's new book, "Keys to Good Cooking: A Guide to Making the Best of Food and Recipes."

Robert Scheer on his latest book: "The Great American Stickup"

Categories:
program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Fri, 10/22/2010

Per Fagereng hosts. The guest is veteran journalist Robert Scheer, editor in chief of Truthdig. They will discuss Scheer’s latest book, “The Great American Stickup: How Reagan Republicans and Clinton Democrats Enriched Wall Street While Mugging Main Street” (Nation Books), which was released on September 7, 2010.
Scheer has built a reputation for strong social and political writing over his 30 years as a journalist. His columns appear in newspapers across the country, and his in-depth interviews have made headlines. He conducted the famous Playboy magazine interview in which Jimmy Carter confessed to the lust in his heart and he went on to do many interviews for the Los Angeles Times with Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton and many other prominent political and cultural figures.
Between 1964 and 1969 he was Vietnam correspondent, managing editor and editor in chief of Ramparts magazine. From 1976 to 1993 he served as a national correspondent for the Los Angeles Times, writing on diverse topics such as the Soviet Union, arms control, national politics and the military. In 1993 he launched a nationally syndicated column based at the Los Angeles Times, where he was named a contributing editor.  That column ran weekly for the next 12 years and is now based at Truthdig.
Scheer  is currently a clinical professor of communications at the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. Scheer has written nine books, including “Thinking Tuna Fish, Talking Death: Essays on the Pornography of Power”; “With Enough Shovels: Reagan, Bush and Nuclear War”; “America After Nixon: The Age of Multinationals”; with his son Christopher and Lakshmi Chaudhry, “The Five Biggest Lies Bush Told Us about Iraq”; “Playing President: “My Close Encounters with Nixon, Carter, Bush I and Clinton—and How They Did Not Prepare Me for George W. Bush”; and “The Pornography of Power: How Defense Hawks Hijacked 9/11 and Weakened America.

Michael Shuman on The Small-Mart Revolution: How Local Businesses Are Beating the Global Competition

program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Fri, 10/22/2010

This is Part 1 of a talk by Michael Shuman, Director for Research and Public Policy for the Business Alliance for Local Living Economies. An economist, attorney, author, and entrepreneur, Shuman is one of the nation’s leading experts on community economics. He has authored, coauthored, or edited seven books, including The Small Mart Revolution: How Local Businesses Are Beating the Global Competition and Going Local: Creating Self-Reliant Communities in the Global Age . He spoke in Portland after the publication of The Small Mart Revolution in 2006.

http://small-mart.org/

  • Length: 35:53 minutes (32.85 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Michael Shuman on The Small-Mart Revolution: How Local Businesses Are Beating the Global Competition, Part 2

program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Fri, 10/22/2010

This is Part 2 of a talk by Michael Shuman, Director for Research and Public Policy for the Business Alliance for Local Living Economies. An economist, attorney, author, and entrepreneur, Shuman is one of the nation’s leading experts on community economics. He has authored, coauthored, or edited seven books, including The Small Mart Revolution: How Local Businesses Are Beating the Global Competition and Going Local: Creating Self-Reliant Communities in the Global Age . He spoke in Portland after the publication of The Small Mart Revolution in 2006.

http://small-mart.org/

  • Length: 72:36 minutes (49.85 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 96Kbps (CBR)

Leslie Marmon Silko talks about her new memoir, "The Turquoise Ledge"

program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Mon, 10/18/2010

Host Kathleen Stephenson speaks with Leslie Marmon Silko, a former professor of English and fiction writing and the author of novels, short stories, essays, poetry, articles, and filmscripts. She has won prizes, fellowships, and grants from such sources as the National Endowment for the Arts and The Boston Globe. She was the youngest writer to be included in The Norton Anthology of Women's Literature, for her short story "Lullaby." Ms. Silko now lives in Tucson, Arizona.

Silko's work is primarily concerned with the relations between different cultures and between humans and the natural world. Silko was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and grew up at Laguna Pueblo. The Pueblo has been home to members of her family for generations and is where she learned traditional stories and legends from her grandmother Lilly and her aunt Susie.

Leslie Marmon Silko will talk about her new memoir, "The Turquoise Ledge," which combines memoir with family history and reflections on the creatures that command her attention and inform her vision of the world, taking readers along on her daily walks through the arroyos and ledges of the Sonoran desert in Arizona.

 

Robert Michael Pyle chronicles search for 800 butterflies in "Mariposa Road"

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program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Thu, 09/30/2010

Host Kathleen Stephenson interviews Robert Michael Pyle, the author of fourteen books, including Chasing Monarchs, Where Bigfoot Walks, and Wintergreen, which won the John Burroughs Medal. A Yale-trained ecologist and a Guggenheim fellow, he is a full-time writer living in southwestern Washington. He'll talk about his new book, Mariposa Road, which tracks his search for as many of the 800 American butterflies as he can find.   Like Pyle’s classic Chasing Monarchs, Mariposa Road recounts his adventures, high and low, in tracking down butterflies in his own low-tech, individual way. Accompanied by Marsha, his cottonwood-limb butterfly net; Powdermilk, his 1982 Honda Civic with 345,000 miles on the odometer; and the small Leitz binoculars he has carried for more than thirty years, Bob ventured out in a series of remarkable trips from his Northwest home.

Writer Yiyun Li on her book, "Gold Boy, Emerald Girl"

Categories:
program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Wed, 09/29/2010

Host Bruce Silverman speaks with Yiyun Li about her new collection of short stories, "Gold Boy, Emerald Girl."

Yiyun Li grew up in Beijing and came to the United States in 1996. Her stories and essays have been published in The New Yorker, Best American Short Stories, O Henry Prize Stories, and elsewhere. She has received fellowships and awards from Lannan Foundation and Whiting Foundation. Her debut collection, A Thousand Years of Good Prayers, won the Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award, PEN/Hemingway Award, Guardian First Book Award, and California Book Award for first fiction; it was also shortlisted for Kiriyama Prize and Orange Prize for New Writers. Her novel, The Vagrants, won the gold medal of California Book Award for fiction. She was selected by Granta as one of the 21 Best Young American Novelists under 35, and was named by The New Yorker as one of the top 20 writers under 40. She is a contributing editor to the Brooklyn-based literary magazine, A Public Space. She lives in Oakland, California with her husband and their two sons, and teaches at University of California, Davis.

  • Length: 26:07 minutes (23.91 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Dr. Catherine Thomasson on the health effects of global warming.

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program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Mon, 09/27/2010

Hosted by Roberta Hall

Today's show features Part 2 of an interview with Dr. Catherine Thomasson, past president ofPhysicians for Social Responsibility, on the health effects of global warming.

Catherine Thomasson is the author of Health Implications of a Nuclear Crisis with Iran, World Affairs Journal. Summer 2007, vol 11.

"Dream of the Turquoise Bee" - Cultural diplomacy in Tibet

program: 
Radiozine
program date: 
Wed, 09/22/2010

Stephanie Potter interviews Dianne Aigaki who is a botanical artist and consultant for nonprofit organizations worldwide, who lives between India, Tibet and Mexico. Aigaki moved to Dharamsala, India at the foot of the Himalayas in 1996, and began working as a volunteer consultant for the Tibetan Exile Government.

During her years in Dharamsala, Aigaki learned to speak Tibetan and built a stone house with extensive gardens. She trained over 300 members of the Tibetan Exile Government and Tibetan nonprofit organizations to write project management plans and funding proposals, and has served as an intermediary for them in securing funding. These projects have ranged from water sanitation, pesticide- free agriculture, electric fencing to keep elephants out of crops, medical care and counseling for torture survivors, to building schools for thousands of Tibetan refuges who are orphans.

In 2000 and 2001, she coordinated and was the primary spokesperson for the highly successful Gyudmed Tantric Monastery Compassion Tours in the United States — traveling with six Tibetan Buddhist monks to thirteen cities each year and raising $500,000 for needed infrastructure, educational and health projects at their monastery in South India.

Diane Aigaki is presenting "The Dream of the Turquoise Bee: Cultural Diplomacy in Eastern Tibeta Slideshow/Presentation on Wednesday, September 22nd at 7PM at the Mazama Mountaineering Center at 527 SE 43rd Ave. in Portland.

Comments

Correction

 A typo occured with one of our guests, Todd Dalotto on Radiozine this past Friday. Our apologies for the oversight.

 

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