More Talk Radio

Cecil and Celeste welcome your calls. This program is open to local, national and international issues ranging from poverty in Portland to politics in Africa.

 

Episode Archive

More Talk Radio on 06/17/13

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More Talk Radio
Air date: 
Mon, 06/17/2013 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
he United States of the United Races: A Utopian History of Racial Mixing
 
Hosts Celeste Carey and Cecil Prescod interview Greg Carter about his new book "The United States of the United Races: A Utopian History of Racial Mixing."
 
Barack Obama’s historic presidency has re-inserted mixed race into the national conversation. While the troubled and pejorative history of racial amalgamation throughout U.S. history is a familiar story, Greg Carter asks us to reconsider an understudied optimist tradition, one which has praised mixture as a means to create a new people, bring equality to all, and fulfill an American destiny.

More Talk Radio on 06/10/13

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Program: 
More Talk Radio
Air date: 
Mon, 06/10/2013 - 8:00am - 9:00am
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Maintaining Integrity in a Hostile World

Join Celeste and Cecil for a discussion about the nature and role of integrity in our personal, social, and political lives. All of us are confronted with insincerity in our workplace, double dealing by our political allies, and dishonesty by people closest to us. How do you deal with these realities while maintaining faith in the possibility of positive transformation? How do we resist cynicism and defeatism in a hostile world? Call us at 503-231-8187 or email at moretalkradio@gmail.com with your ideas and questions.

More Talk Radio on 06/03/13

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More Talk Radio
Air date: 
Mon, 06/03/2013 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Cultural Influences on Our Social and Political Lives

What is the soundtrack of your life? What movies and television shows had a lasting impact on you? Celeste and Cecil invite your calls to talk about how television, movies, and music influence you and your circle.  Join us in a discussion about the role of traditional and new media in shaping our political and cultural landscapes.  Our phone number is 503-231-8187.  Email us at moretalkradio@gmail.com

More Talk Radio on 05/20/13

Program: 
More Talk Radio
Air date: 
Mon, 05/20/2013 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
We Will Shoot Back: Armed Resistance in the Mississippi Freedom Movement
Hosts Celeste Carey and Cecil Prescod speak with scholar and activist Akinyele Umoja about his book We Will Shoot Back: Armed Resistance in the Mississippi Freedom Movement.
 
The notion that the civil rights movement in the southern United States was a nonviolent movement remains a dominant theme of civil rights memory and representation in popular culture. Yet in dozens of southern communities, Black people picked up arms to defend their leaders, communities, and lives.

More Talk Radio on 05/13/13

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Program: 
More Talk Radio
Air date: 
Mon, 05/13/2013 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
The Folly of Technological Solutionism

Join us Monday at 8am when our guest will be Evgeny Morozov, author of "To Save Everything, Click Here: The Folly of Technological Solutionism". Mr. Morozov, author of the well received "The Net Delusion", considers our inordinate love affair with "technological solutionism"as threatening to fundamental democratic ideals and practices. 

The temptation of the digital age is to fix everything—from crime to corruption to pollution to obesity—by digitally quantifying, tracking, or gamifying behavior. But when we change the motivations for our moral, ethical, and civic behavior we may also change the very nature of that behavior.

More Talk Radio on 05/06/13

Program: 
More Talk Radio
Air date: 
Mon, 05/06/2013 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Call-in Talk Radio

More Talk Radio on 04/29/13

Program: 
More Talk Radio
Air date: 
Mon, 04/29/2013 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Why people react differently to panhandlers

Why do people react differently to panhandlers?  A recent article by Alyssa Figueroa reflected on people's various responses to panhandlers.  Join us as we discuss Ms. Figueroa's article.  Are you a panhandler? Do you give to all those who ask? Share your views  by calling or emailing to join the conversation.  503-231-8187, moretalkradio@gmail.com.


http://www.alternet.org/hard-times-usa/why-people-react-differently-panh...

More Talk Radio on 04/22/13

Program: 
More Talk Radio
Air date: 
Mon, 04/22/2013 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Robert Bullard on How the Government Response to Disaster Endangers African American Communities

Hosts Celeste Carey and Cecil Prescod speak with Robert Bullard, the Dean of the Barbara Jordan-Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University. Robert Bullard is often described as the father of environmental justice. He is the author of seventeen books that address sustainable development, environmental racism, urban land use, industrial facility siting, community reinvestment, housing, transportation, climate justice, emergency response, smart growth, and regional equity. He'll discuss his most recent book "The Wrong Complexion for Protection: How the Government Response to Disaster Endangers African American Communities."  

 

More Talk Radio on 04/15/13

Program: 
More Talk Radio
Air date: 
Mon, 04/15/2013 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
The Unknown History of the Death Penalty

Hosts Cecil Prescod and Celeste Carey speak with Stephen John Hartnett about his book EXECUTING DEMOCRACY: CAPITAL PUNISHMENT & THE MAKING OF AMERICA.

Even the most ardent death penalty supporter doesn’t claim that capital punishment is a deterrent to crime. We know that it’s not. We also know that innocent people have landed on death row. But what else do we know about the death penalty, and about its fraught history in the U.S.? Tune in to find out more.

More Talk Radio on 04/08/13

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More Talk Radio
Air date: 
Mon, 04/08/2013 - 8:00am - 9:00am
Short Description: 
Rules of Engagement: Gender-Sensitivity

Rules of Engagement: Gender-Sensitivity in Society. Women continue to battle sexism . At a recent fundraiser President Obama stated that California Attorney General Kamala Harris was "brilliant," "dedicated," "tough," and "exactly what you'd want in anybody who is administering the law" .  He then refered to her as "by far the best-looking attorney general in the country".  The president, criticized by many for his remarks about the Attorney General 's appearance, subsequently apologized.  The incident became the subject of many discussions  about the struggles of women to be accepted in society.

Audio

Open forum on KBOO, community radio and community in general

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More Talk Radio
program date: 
Mon, 08/26/2013
This proram aired on August 26, 2013, just before the last KBOO Board election and during a contentious time at the station.During that time  Paul Roland produced a number of programs which looked at the history, importance and value of community radio, and its role socially and politically. This was one of the few (and very tentative) attempts on air to open up discussion with the listeners about issues involving KBOO itself.
  • Length: 50:52 minutes (46.57 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Nuclear Issues in our Nuclear Age

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More Talk Radio
program date: 
Mon, 08/05/2013

Hosted by Cecil Prescod and Celeste Carey.

Today's Guests are Artists Kerry Davis, Anna Daedalus, and Yukiyo Kawano, along with Activist, Chuck Johnson.  Kerry, Anna, and Yukiyo are artists and will talk about their exhibit at the Nikkei Legacy Center and Chuck Johnson will talk about his work related to Hanford and its connection to to Hiroshima, Nagasaki, and Fukushima.

Visual artists Anna Daedalus and Kerry Davis began working together in 2011 as part of 13 Hats, a collective of Portland artists and writers. 13 Hats came together for two years to pursue interdisciplinary work and creative dialogue through collaboration. In that time the group mounted three exhibitions and various readings, produced numerous publications and seeded collaborative projects that continue today. In August 2012, Daedalus and Davis developed and demonstrated a prototype Shadow Box as part of the Portland Shadows Project, an outdoor public reading organized by fellow 13 Hats member David Abel, in commemoration of Hiroshima Day.

Their work together has sparked a larger multidisciplinary project, Mapping the Shadows, a collective exploration and meditation on such interrelated concerns as the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, radioactive contamination at Hanford and Fukushima, climate change, the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, water politics, and global economic justice.

Kerry Davis studied photography & filmmaking at PSU, PCC and Oregon College of Art and Craft and works in many photographic formats such as pinhole, toy camera & digital, using contact printing & alternative processes. His works have shown at Blackfish and 12×16 Galleries, Portland Art Center, and other galleries in Portland and the Pacific Northwest.

Anna Daedalus’s large-scale photographic prints have been shown in Portland and Seattle, and her work can be found in various collections, including the John Wilson Special Collections at the Multnomah County Library in Oregon and the Beinecke Library at Yale University.

Yukiyo Kawano, a third generation hibakusha (nuclear bomb survivor) grew up decades after the bombing of Hiroshima. Her work is personal, reflecting lasting attitudes towards the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Kawano’s main focus is her/our forgetfulness, her/our dialectics of memory, issues around cultural politics, and historical politics.

Chuck Johnson is the  Oregon/Washington PSR Joint Nuclear Power Task Force Director

Chuck Johnson is an activist, writer, and development professional with roots in the anti-nuclear movement dating back to the 1970s. He was an active member of Trojan Decommissioning Alliance and was the co-author of a ballot measure which passed in 1980, placing a moratorium on nuclear power plant construction in Oregon until a permanent disposal site could be established for the high-level waste from that plant. Chuck served as a Regional Coordinator for the national office of PSR in the 1980s and as Executive Director of a national anti- nuclear clearinghouse, Nuclear Free America, based in Baltimore in the 1990s.  After a hiatus to work raising funds for Western Oregon University and Portland State University – and complete a book, “Standing at the Water’s Edge: Bob Straub’s Battle for the Soul of Oregon,” coming out from Oregon State University Press in November 2012 – Johnson is happy to be back working to end the nuclear power experiment in the Pacific Northwest.

 

Paul Roland talks with Bruce Levine about recovering collective self-confidence

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More Talk Radio
program date: 
Mon, 02/18/2013
Today's guest is Bruce Levine--psychologist, social critic and author of several books and numerous articles. His most recent book is "Get Up, Stand Up: Uniting Populists, Energizing the Defeated and Battling the Corporate Elite." He has also written "Surviving Depression" and "Commonsense Rebellion: Taking Back Your Life from Drugs, Shrinks, Corporations and a World Gone Crazy."

Jane McAlevey on Making Unions Matter Again

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More Talk Radio
program date: 
Mon, 12/17/2012

 Host Cecil Prescod interviews labor activist Jane McAlevey about the state of the labor movement and how to make unions matter again. McAlevey has been an organizer in the labor and environmental justice movements for the last twenty years. She is a PhD candidate at CUNY Graduate Center and lives in the San Francisco Bay Area. Her latest book is Raising Expectations (and Raising Hell): My Decade Fighting for the Labor Movement, a look at how one militant union organizer fought the bosses—and national labor leaders. It is published by Verso.

  • Length: 54:40 minutes (50.04 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Brenton Mock and the future of the Voting Rights Act of 1965

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More Talk Radio
program date: 
Mon, 12/03/2012

Hosts Cecil and Celeste are joined by Colorlines columnist Brenton Mock, to reflect on the election and the future status of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Brenton Mock is a New Orleans-based investigative journalist, Voting Rights Fellow for Colorlines.com, and former senior editor for The Loop 21, where he covered electoral politics and reporting on voter ID issues. Mock also works as web editor for the online, citizen-journalist driven blogsite "Bridge the Gulf" and helped launch the New Orleans online investigative news site "The Lens." He previously worked at The American Prospect as a reporter and blogger covering environmental justice issues through a fellowship awarded by the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting. His work has been published in GOOD, The Root, The Daily Beast, Newsweek.com, The Grio, The Atlantic, Next American City, Truthout.org, Alternet, Vibe.com, XXL, The Source, and Religion Dispatches.

  • Length: 54:00 minutes (24.72 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 64Kbps (CBR)

50th Anniversary of Hiroshima Portland Memorial

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More Talk Radio
program date: 
Thu, 08/09/2012

Today on Hiroshima Day hosts Cecil Prescod and Celeste Carey speak with participants in the Portland event marking 50 years of remembering Hiroshima and Nagasaki and calling for end to nuclear weapons.

Peace and community groups in Portland will mark their 50th year of commemorating the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki with a program of speakers and performers featuring Washington State Poet Laureate Kathleen Flenniken beginning at 6pm on August 6th, at the Japanese American Historical Plaza on the Portland Waterfront at NW Naito Parkway & Couch Street. http://kboo.fm/2012psr

  • Length: 52:18 minutes (47.88 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

American Canopy: Trees, Forests and the Making of a Nation

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More Talk Radio
program date: 
Mon, 07/30/2012

Hosts Celeste Carey and Cecil Prescod speak with Eric Rutkow about his new book American Canopy: Trees, Forests and the Making of a Nation. The book tells the story of the relationship between Americans and their trees across the entire span of our nation’s history.

Eric Rutkow reads at Powell's on Burnside on Monday, 7/30, at 7:30PM and at the Hoyt Arboretum at 4000 SW Fairview Boulevard on Tuesday, 7/31, at 6pm. 

The history of trees in America is no less remarkable than the history of the United States itself. Eric Rutkow’s epic account shows how trees were essential to the early years of the republic and indivisible from the country’s rise as both an empire and a civilization. Among American Canopy’s many fascinating stories: the Liberty Trees, where colonists gathered to plot rebellion against the British; Henry David Thoreau’s famous retreat into the woods; the creation of New York City’s Central Park; the great fire of 1871 that killed a thousand people in the lumber town of Peshtigo, Wisconsin; the fevered attempts to save the American chestnut and the American elm from extinction; and the controversy over spotted owls and the old-growth forests they inhabited. Rutkow also explains how trees were of deep interest to such figures as George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Teddy Roosevelt, and FDR, who oversaw the planting of more than three billion trees nationally in his time as president.

As symbols of liberty, community, and civilization, trees are perhaps the loudest silent figures in our country’s history. America started as a nation of people frightened of the deep, seemingly infinite woods; we then grew to rely on our forests for progress and profit; by the end of the twentieth century we came to understand that the globe’s climate is dependent on the preservation of trees. Today, few people think about where timber comes from, but most of us share a sense that to destroy trees is to destroy part of ourselves and endanger the future.

Eric Rutkow, a graduate of Yale University and Harvard Law School, has worked as a lawyer on environmental issues. He splits his time between New York and New Haven, Connecticut, where he is pursuing a doctorate in American history at Yale. American Canopy is his first book.

  • Length: 52:03 minutes (23.83 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 64Kbps (CBR)

Some of My Best Friends Are Black: The Strange Story of Integration in America

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More Talk Radio
program date: 
Mon, 07/23/2012

Hosts Celeste Carey and Cecil Prescod speak with Tanner Colby, author of "SOME OF MY BEST FRIENDS ARE BLACK: The Strange Story of Integration in America," one white man’s unflinching exploration of Jim Crow’s legacy and what it will take to see that legacy undone.

In spite of all the efforts of Martin Luther King, Jr., and a multitude of other Civil Rights leaders and activists, the disheartening reality in today’s America is that black people and white people still don’t spend much time together—at work, school, church, or really anywhere.

After Barack Obama’s historical presidential nomination, and after a long campaign spent fervently supporting the man who would become America’s first black president, Colby—who is perhaps most widely known for his biographies of Chris Farley and John Belushi—realized that, despite his open-minded, liberal attitudes and his hip Brooklyn zip code, he didn’t actually know any black people.

 

So Rich, So Poor - Why It's So Hard to End Poverty in America

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More Talk Radio
program date: 
Mon, 07/16/2012

Hosts Celeste Carey and Cecil Prescod speak with Peter Edelman, author of the new book So Rich, So Poor: Why It's So Hard to End Poverty in America. The income-level disparity in this country is now wider than at any point since the Great Depression. How can some be so rich, while others are so poor? According to Edelman, we have taken important positive steps without which 25 to 30 million more people would be poor, but poverty fluctuates with the business cycle. The structure of today’s economy has stultified wage growth for half of America’s workers—with even worse results at the bottom and for people of color—while bestowing billions on those at the top.

Peter Edelman is professor at Georgetown University Law Center. A top adviser to Senator Robert F. Kennedy from 1964 to 1968, he went on to fill various roles in President Bill Clinton’s administration, from which he famously resigned in protest after Clinton signed the 1996 welfare reform legislation.

  • Length: 56:40 minutes (51.88 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

The Gender Entrapment of Black Women and How VIolence in the Lives of Black Women is Ignored

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More Talk Radio
program date: 
Mon, 07/09/2012

Hosts Celeste Carey and Cecil Prescod speak with Beth Richie, Director of the Institute for Research on Race and Public Policy, Professor of African American Studies and Criminology, Law and Justice at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Her new book is Arrested Justice: Black Women, Violence and America's Prison Nation.

In Arrested Justice Richie shows that the threat of violence to Black women has never been more serious, demonstarting how conservative legal, social, political and economic policies have impacted activism in the US-based movement to end violence against women. She argues that Black women face particular peril because of the ways that race and culture have not figured centrally enough in the analysis of the causes and consequences of gender violence. As a result the extent of physical, sexual and other forms of violence in the lives of Black women are minimized at best, and frequently ignored.

  • Length: 53:49 minutes (49.27 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Comments

Poll Watcher:"High Concetration of People of Color" Voting

If the act of voting -exercising a duty and privilege- evokes this response, we ought recognize that the vote is most valuable and must be protected.

federal reserve

greetings, good show this morning. another good book is "web of debt" and also a podcast going through the basics. a link to the book can be found from the podcast page. folks should get onto this.

http://c-realmpodcast.podomatic.com/entry/449084

My error

Hi, Cecil, I called in to your fine program this morning to give the announcement about Imam Mamadou Toure's presentation at the Quaker Meetinghouse. Apparently I gave the wrong date: the correct date is Friday, January 25. I would greatly appreciate it if you could give that date on next week's program, I'm sorry to have confused things.
Peace, Jim Metcalfe

 

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