Black Book Talk

Monthly program featuring interviews and discussions of works by African American authors. Co-hosts Emma Jackson Ford, O B Hill and Patricia Welch review works in all genres by well-known and emerging authors. Occasional call-in shows allow audience members to talk directly to authors and/or share their opinions on works by Black authors.

Hosted by

Episode Archive

BATTY BWOY by Max-Arthur Mantle

Program: 
Black Book Talk
Air date: 
Thu, 06/04/2015 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
A young black, gay, Jamaican comes to the US for sexual freedom only to find greater challenges.

The coming of age story of Mark Palmer, a black, gay, Jamaican where "Boom bye bye inna batty bwoy head" (meaning, gunshot to gay men) has replaced the island's motto "Out of many one people." The son of an overbearing, absentee, neglectful mother, he is thrust in an environment that requires a thick skin from torments and socio-economic disparities. Suppressing his "gay tendencies" to detract being bashed or murdered, he migrates to America and breaks free from the closet to a world where he is disenfranchised and arrested. As his life spirals from bad choices, he clings to desperate measures and finds hope.

Black Book Talk on 05/07/15

Program: 
Black Book Talk
Air date: 
Thu, 05/07/2015 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Monthly program featuring interviews and discussions of works by African American authors

Patricia, O.B. and Emma speak with David Dante Troutt about his book, "The Price of Paradise: The Costs of Inequality and a Vision for a More Equitable America."
David Dante Troutt is Professor of Law and Justice John J. Francis Scholar at the Rutgers University-Newark Law School. He also serves as Director of the Center on Law in Metropolitan Equity at Rutgers Law School. 

Debrena Jackson Gandy

Program: 
Black Book Talk
Air date: 
Thu, 04/02/2015 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Interview with author, life coach Debrena Jackson Gandy
Debrena Jackson Gandy is a two-time national best-selling author of Sacred Pampering Principles(HarperCollins) and All the Joy You Can Stand (Random House), and her newest book, The Love Lies.  She is a transformational Speaker; Love Relationships Mentor; Business Consultant, and Personal Success Coach. She’s been Featured in Oprah’s O magazine, Ebony, Essence, Black Enterprise, Woman’s Day, Heart & Soul, and on Oprah.com and Redbook.com.

Renee Watson, This Side of Home

Program: 
Black Book Talk
Air date: 
Thu, 03/05/2015 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Author Renee Watson discusses novel This Side of Home

Renée Watson is the author of This Side of Home (Bloomsbury 2015) and Harlem’s Little Blackbird: The Story of Florence Mills (Random House 2012). Her work has received several honors including an NAACP Image Award nomination in children’s literature. Her novel, What Momma Left Me, (Bloomsbury 2010), debuted as the New Voice for 2010 in middle grade fiction. Her one woman show, Roses are Red Women are Blue, debuted at the Lincoln Center at a showcase for emerging artists.

Black Book Talk on 02/05/15

Program: 
Black Book Talk
Air date: 
Thu, 02/05/2015 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Monthly program featuring interviews and discussions of works by African American authors

Are We There, Yet? The Ultimate Challenge

Program: 
Black Book Talk
Air date: 
Thu, 12/04/2014 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Interview with Martin Davis, author, Are We There, Yet?

Martin Davis, author of Are We There Yet? The Ultimate Challenge provides his blue print of  what People of Color need to do in order to change their  standing in American society. The book delivers anoutline that speaks directly to the ills black  people are facing today in America, and how they can remedy those ills internally, without the help, permission, or assistance of anyone else.

William Wells Brown, An American Life

Program: 
Black Book Talk
Air date: 
Thu, 11/06/2014 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Interview with author Ezra Greenspan, author of William Wells Brown: an American Life
Born into slavery and "rented" out in adolescence to a succession of steamboat captains, William Wells Brown (1814–1884) ended his life as an accomplished writer and activist.  A hugely popular speaker on antislavery circuits (both American and British), Brown went on to write Clotel; or, The President's Daughter, the first novel published by an African-American.   The fictional tale of Clotel, fathered by PresidentThomas Jefferson,  echoed well-known 19th century rumors that Jefferson had several children by his slave Sally Hemings.  He also practiced medicine, ran for office, and campaigned for black uplift, temperance, and civil rights.

Remembering J California Cooper

Program: 
Black Book Talk
Air date: 
Thu, 10/02/2014 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Re-broadcast of January 7, 2010, interview with author J California Cooper who died September 20.

Described by the Los Angeles Times as "a voice for the struggles of Black women in novels and short stories prized for their folksy wisdom and original voices,"   J California Cooper died last week at 82 years old.  The Times continued with a quote from Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Alice Walker:  "I just loved her writing," said Walker, who discovered Cooper in the mid-1980s and became her first publisher.  "She wanted to show the richness of the lives of people who often don't have much exposure.

I Thought I Wouldn't Tell It: A Memoir of Hard Life and Hope.

Program: 
Black Book Talk
Air date: 
Thu, 08/07/2014 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
A Jamaican immigrant flees home to beat the odds to build a better life for herself and her family.

Portland author, Deloris Dallas will discuss her memoir, I Thought I Wouldn't Tell  It:  A Memoir of Hard Life and Hope.  Her story starts  on Jamaica, an island whose beauty often contradicts ugly moments in her childhood.

ReShonda Tate Billingsley

Program: 
Black Book Talk
Air date: 
Thu, 07/03/2014 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
Short Description: 
Interview with author ReShonda Tate Billingsley

ReShonda Tate Billingsley is the national bestselling author of 30 books. Her sophomore novel, Let the Church Say Amen, has been made into a movie, directed by actress Regina King and produced by Queen Latifah’s Flava Unit Productions. 

In addition to adult novels, she has also penned a teen series, Good Girlz. This winner of the 2012 NAACP Award for Outstanding Literary Work will discusses her works with the Black Book Talk co-hosts.

Audio

Novelist Jacqueline E. Luckett: "Searching for Tina Turner"

Categories:
program: 
Black Book Talk
program date: 
Thu, 02/03/2011

The guest is Jacqueline E. Luckett, author of Searching for Tina Turner.  In the novel Lena Harrison Spencer is in her mid-fifties, and the time has come for her to face the hard truths of what it means to have it all and still find oneself unfulfilled. When Lena determines that what she needs is the strength to change directions, Tina Turner becomes the icon from whose story she derives strength, even as everyone else tells her she's crazy for giving up her cashmere cocoon.

Black Book Talk on 12/02/10

Categories:
program: 
Black Book Talk
program date: 
Thu, 12/02/2010

Hosts Emma Jackson Ford and O.B. Hill review good books by black authors.

Author Isabel Wilkerson, "The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration"

program: 
Black Book Talk
program date: 
Thu, 11/04/2010

Hosts Patricia Hill Welch, Emma Jackson Ford and O.B. Hill talk with Pulitzer Prize winning author Isabel Wilkerson about her new book “The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration.”

Isabel Wilkerson won the 1994 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing. She is the first black woman to win a Pulitzer in journalism and the first African American to win for individual reporting.

She is currently Professor of Journalism and Director of Narrative Nonfiction at Boston University. 

Good summer reads

Categories:
program: 
Black Book Talk
program date: 
Thu, 08/05/2010

In the July Black Book Talk,  Emma Jackson Ford, O B Hill and Patricia Welch host a discussion for summer reading, and readers call in with their favorites.  Books include Yellow Moon, a novel

Children's author Renee Watson writes about resiliency and hope

Categories:
program: 
Black Book Talk
program date: 
Thu, 07/01/2010

Hosts Patricia Welch, and Emma Jackson Ford speak with children's author Renee Watson, who discusses her two newly-released books: "What Mama Taught Me" and "A Place Where Hurricanes Happen," a tale of Katrina as children saw it.  Renee Watson was born in New Jersey but grew up in Portland and attended Jefferson High School. 
She studied creative writing at The New School in Manhattan and graduated with a certificate in drama therapy.

 

Recommended books by black authors

Categories:
program: 
Black Book Talk
program date: 
Thu, 04/01/2010

Emma Jackson Ford, Patricia Welch, O.B. Hill and callers share their recommendations about books by african-american, african-european and other black authors.

Shoshana Johnson: "I'm Still Standing: From Captive U.S. Soldier to Free Citizen--My Journey Home"

program: 
Black Book Talk
program date: 
Thu, 03/04/2010

 Hosted by: Emma Jackson Ford, Patricia Welch. The guest is Shoshana Johnson, author of I'm Still Standing: From Captive U.S. Soldier to Free Citizen--My Journey Home.  In March of 2003 world headlines were made when a U.S. army convoy was attacked in the city of An-Nasiriyah en route to Baghdad. Several soldiers were killed and others were taken prisoner.  Jessica Lynch became the face and name associated with this tragedy, but another female soldier, Shoshana Johnson, was also wounded and captured in the ambush. Shoshana became the first black female prisoner of war in United States history. She was held for twenty-two days.  When Shoshana returned to the United States, she received numerous awards for her valor, including the Bronze Star, Purple Heart, and Prisoner of War medals. She was bound by a military gag order. She was unable to discuss what really happened in Iraq -- until now.

In this account she reveals decisions made by higher-ups that may have led to the capture, describes the pain of post-traumatic stress disorder, and shares the surprising story of how a specialist in a maintenance company ended up on the front lines of war.

Shoshana Nyree Johnson was born in the Republic of Panama and moved to the United States with her family when she was a child. A second-generation Army veteran, she did not plan a career in the military, but became a JROTC cadet in 1991 and joined the U.S. Army in September 1998 while attending classes at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP).

On March 23rd, 2003, during Operation Iraqi Freedom, Shoshana was in a convoy that was ambushed in the city of an-Nasiriyah. Wounded, she and five fellow soldiers were captured and taken as prisoners of war, making world news headlines. The POWs were rescued by U.S. Marines on the morning of April 13, and Shoshana returned to the U.S., retiring from the Army on a Temporary Disability Honorable Discharge in December 2003. Her awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart Medal, and the Prisoner of War Medal. U.S. Army officials also identified Shoshana as the first female POW of Operation Iraqi Freedom, and the first black female POW in U.S. war history.

 

Arnold Adoff talks about his late wife, author Virginia Hamilton

Categories:
program: 
Black Book Talk
program date: 
Thu, 02/04/2010

Hosts Patricia Welch, Emma Ford and O.B. Hill speak with poet Arnold Adoff about his late wife Virginia Hamilton, author of the classic works: "M.C. Higgins, the Great;" "Zeely;" "The People Could Fly," and many more award winning novels. Adoff co-edited "Virginia Hamilton: Speeches, Essays and Conversations."

  • Length: 28:47 minutes (13.18 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 64Kbps (CBR)

Author J. California Cooper: "Life Is Short, But Wide"

Categories:
program: 
Black Book Talk
program date: 
Thu, 01/07/2010

Hosts Patricia Welch, O.B. Hill and Emma Jackson Ford speak with J. California Cooper about her most recent novel Life Is Short, But Wide.  From Publisher's Weekly: "Cooper's characteristic motherly wit carries an appealing raft of characters through a world tougher than it is tender, but touched with beauty and wisdom." Cooper has been described as "telling stories before she could write," and is the author of plays, short stories and novels. She was honored as the Black Playwright of 1978.

Hot Summer Reading

Categories:
program: 
Black Book Talk
program date: 
Thu, 07/02/2009

In July, Black Book Talk hosted a call-in discussion with picks for summer time reading. 

  • Title: Hot Summer Reading
  • Length: 25:21 minutes (10.16 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 22kHz 56Kbps (CBR)

 

Copyright © 2012 KBOO Community Radio | Copyright Policy | Community Guidelines | Website Illustration & Design by: KMF ILLUSTRATION