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Air Cascadia on 06/05/14

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Air Cascadia on 06/04/14

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Air Cascadia on 06/03/14

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Air Cascadia on 06/02/14

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Air Cascadia on 05/30/14

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Air Cascadia on 05/29/14

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Air Cascadia on 05/28/14

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Air Cascadia on 05/27/14

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Air Cascadia is off today. Flashpoints will start at 10AM.

Air Cascadia on 05/23/14

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Air Cascadia on 05/22/14

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Audio

Syria's Business....

program: 
Air Cascadia
program date: 
Fri, 05/03/2013

 

 

US Drone Wars: The Constitutional and Counterterrorism Implications of Targeted Killing

Submitted to the Senate Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Human Rights

 

Testimony Prepared by: Robert S. McCaw.

Robert McCaw, Farea al-Muslimi and Noam Chomsky walk up to the Gates of Heaven. Saint Peter looks up from the gem-studded, jewel-encrusted, gilded tome witch conceals the latest edition of Hustler rather in the same manner that a Kardashian conceals not much.

SP: Do you have a reservation?

Chomsky: Do we look like Indians?

SP: Hm. Depends…Hey, if this is a trick question designed to entrap me for racial profiling…

Al-Muslimi: No entrapment required. 

SP slams the book shut, sighs, lights a cigarette and speaks into a small cloud hovering above and to the left of his desk: Gwen? Listen, hold my calls and shit for, oh, I guess 30 , 45 minutes? Make it an hour.  I’ll need to decompensate…

(SP listens)

Uh, yoga. Keeps my Shaktis aligned…What?…..Of course I know what a ‘Shakti’ is..Right;; and Jesus invented yoga like Al Gore invented the Internet…

Al-Muslimi: That’s good!

Chomsky: Wish I’d said it.

McCaw: Or Edward Said – peace be upon him -  wrote the Koran…or

Saint Peter: (Leaps to his feet, upending desk, book, cloud.  Magazine falls out.

McCaw: or Obama wrote ‘Who Wrote the Book of Love’

Al-Muslimi: Wish I’d said that…

Saint Peter: Shut up. Just shut the fuck up.  For Christ’s sake, this is it the Big H…

Chomsky:  Heroin?

SP: (Shakes head.  The question is too stupid to deflect) not a Three Stooges Special. God, why do parents let their kids watch that shit anyway.  A whole lost generation…several.

(Gigantic, thunderous voice off-stage: Because either it’s a single family househoid or else both parents work, or the kids are teenagers experimenting with amphetamines.  Anything else?)

  • Length: 17:30 minutes (16.02 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

The Future as the Prison We Purchased With Our Past

program: 
Air Cascadia
program date: 
Tue, 04/30/2013

I'd love to leave links in my tracks through the woods

 

www.Forestdefensenow.com

Jacki Dingfelder, 503-986-1723

http://www.prwatch.org/news/2013/04/12073/having-spent-millions-influencing-three-branches-government-kochs-look-buy-fourth

 

Thirty people were  arrested protesting against unmanned aerial drones outside Hancock Field Air Force National Guard Base. 

Syracuse, New York, y’know…

After a series of sleepless rallies and workshops held in Syracuse over the weekend by the Upstate Coalition to Ground the Drones and End the Wars.The Post-Standard reports that the arrests Sunday came

A group of people lying on the base's driveway were arrested. Charges include disorderly conduct, obstructing governmental administration and loitering. About 250 people had marched to the gates,

“ some pounding drums and chanting.” Yes, but what color were their knickers? That’s for you ladies.  Boys; are you athletic supporters? Of course you are.

But, getting arrested. Over. And. Over. And Over. Again. While the rest of the country’s got its head in a bag of Doritos and its arse translated into ones and zeros that spark and flash across the sky over Wall Street, The City, Hong Kong, Singapore.

Look! Up in the sky! It’s your arse making money for Rupert Murdoch.

They go to jail – and in some cases prison – for their beliefs, on your behalf, in the name of some semblance of a future…

And all the other arses should go jail.  For being addicted that rots body and soul faster than heroin ever did.

And I should know…

The base is home to the 174th Attack Wing of the New York Air National Guard, which operates unmanned, armed drones. They are used for intelligence gathering and bombing ground targets.

  • Length: 15:34 minutes (6.24 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 22kHz 56Kbps (CBR)

It's All 1's and 0's: the CEO's won and the rest of us get 0's

program: 
Air Cascadia
program date: 
Mon, 04/29/2013

Hubris is one of the great renewable resources.

 

-   P. J. O'Rourke

 

 

 

We have a gaggle of over-paid under-achievers roaming the tunnels of our medical care delivery apparatus.  We have a state microbe…and we have this: School of the Americas Watch (SOA Watch) shoots and scores.   Yes.  SOA Watch won a hard-ass court case against the Pentagon!

 

The judge ruled that the Pentagon has no grounds for its refusal to disclose the names of graduates and instructors of the SOA/WHINSEC  (the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation). This is another setback for the Pentagon, following the withdrawal announcements by Nicaragua and Ecuador.

 

And the Department of Justice, which represented the Pentagon in the lawsuit, did not immediately respond to an Associated Press request for comment on Wednesday. The Obama administration has 90 days to appeal the judge's order to release the names of SOA/ WHINSEC graduates and instructors to SOA Watch.

 

 

 

In a rare reflection of judicial independence, United States District Judge Phyllis J. Hamilton from the Northern District of California ordered the Pentagon to release the names of who trains and teaches at SOA/WHINSEC, a U.S. military training school for Latin American soldiers that has been connected to torturers, death squads and military dictators throughout the Americas. Human rights activists had taken the U.S. government to court over its refusal to release the information, and won.

 

 

Read the court ruling here: SOAW.org/judgment

  • Length: 14:54 minutes (13.64 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

'Call It, Friend-o': Why "Gun Control" Will Kick Down Your Door and Take You Away.

program: 
Air Cascadia
program date: 
Thu, 04/25/2013

Has anyone stopped to question why the federal government - that greater part of which represents private interests and the hyper-private transfer of power from people to corporations?

In the not too distant future, expect the knock on that door in your head and the voice in your ear saying: It's too late; I'm already in the house...

Yes, You are not alone.  And Yes, Catherine Austin Fitts told us that there is really only one plausible reason that the administration is betting the House (pun intended) on "gun control"....

And Yes Again: Corporations are people too.  And people put other people in prison all the Time

Private police

Private prisons

Private planet.

That's 'Cop-italism', Baby. Feel it swell and harden

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Length: 14:39 minutes (13.41 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Musical Chairs : Wyden Dueling and Dealing on the Sen. Finance Committee

program: 
Air Cascadia
program date: 
Wed, 04/24/2013

Oregon’s gift to the  Senate Finance Committee  is about to be Sen. Ron Wyden.  Wyden at the front of the  line if his fellow Democrats keep control of the Senate in the 2014 elections.

The pending chairmanship offers Wyden the chance to be a key player on issues affecting a huge chunk of the economy and of government: taxes, health care, international trade and Social Security.  To say nothing of the pressure, that slight twist in the groin administered by AIPAC operatives.  But a name means nothing til you sign it.  And Ron signed on long ago.  Ask Bob Packwood; the former Senator was the last Oregonian to hold the committee's chairmanship before his resignation in 1995.

 

Packwood said that besides shaping legislation on some of the biggest issues in Washington, Wyden will be in a position to extract favors from the chairmen of other committees – all of whom also want provisions in the tax code that have a particular impact on their states.

Right: that’s how they get it done in Washington.  Chairman a Chairman duels and deals.

  • Length: 15:27 minutes (14.15 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

A Painful Brainful: That was Earth Day; Now It's Back to World Day

program: 
Air Cascadia
program date: 
Tue, 04/23/2013

 

If it’s Tuesday…

Then the Constitution subcommittee of the Senate Judiciary Committee is holding a hearing on the ethics, legality, constitutionality, and political costs of the drone strike policy.

 

This will be the first time in the history of the drone strike policy that there has been a public Congressional hearing like this focused on the policy.

The history of drone strike policy: now there’s a painful brainful.

The House Judiciary Committee says it postponed its meeting to authorize the issuance of a subpoena to the Department of Justice for documents pertaining to the legal justification of drone strikes on alleged terrorists overseas, after DOJ agreed to provide the requested documents to the committee. Once arrangements are made for viewing the documents, the Committee will cancel the meeting to authorize the subpoena, its statement says. [The statement notes that some - but not all -of these documents have been provided to the House and Senate Intelligence Committees and the Senate Judiciary Committee, so it will be striking to see whether House Judiciary will stop pushing when it gets what the other committees got, or whether it will keep pushing.]

The House Judiciary Committee says it postponed its meeting to authorize the issuance of a subpoena to the Department of Justice for documents pertaining to the legal justification of drone strikes on alleged terrorists overseas, after DOJ agreed to provide the requested documents to the committee. Once arrangements are made for viewing the documents, the Committee will cancel the meeting to authorize the subpoena, its statement says. [The statement notes that some - but not all -of these documents have been provided to the House and Senate Intelligence Committees and the Senate Judiciary Committee, so it will be striking to see whether House Judiciary will stop pushing when it gets what the other committees got, or whether it will keep pushing.]

 

  • Length: 15:05 minutes (13.8 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Earth Day 2013: The Environment is a State of Mind; Mind is Cellular Soul

program: 
Air Cascadia
program date: 
Mon, 04/22/2013

Lessons from Lost Valley

Sociocracy: A Permaculture Approach to Community Evolution

 

By Melanie Rios

(Published in the Winter 2011 issue of Communities magazine – Issue #153.)

 

Partial diagram of sociocratic organizational structure at Lost Valley Center. The water circle was a temporary circle that has since disbanded. The arrows stand for people who are representatives of one circle to the other circle.

 

In 2008 Lost Valley took decision-making power away from its consensus-based intentional community and transformed into a hierarchical business. The organization (a 501(c)3 nonprofit operating an 87-acre permaculture education and conference center outside Dexter, Oregon) hoped to become more economically solvent through this change, but it continued to struggle financially.

 

Two years later, in dire economic straits, we began integrating top-down and flat-hierarchical governance systems by adopting a system called sociocracy, which I learned about at a workshop by John Schinnerer at the Northwest Permaculture Convergence. Here is how our conversion to a sociocratic governance system at Lost Valley can be viewed as a form of social permaculture that has helped our 21-year-old community thrive both socially and economically.

 

Observe First, then Interpret and Interact

 

The first principle of permaculture is observation. In the visible world, for example, we are advised to observe flows of water and other characteristics of a newly acquired property for a full year before taking steps to change what is there. I have been observing Lost Valley for a decade, first as a visitor and a student, then as a guest permaculture teacher, and now in the role of Executive Director. I see the succession of governance systems at Lost Valley as a natural progression from what the spiral dynamics folk call the green vmeme to the yellow vmeme.

 

The Lost Valley that I first entered 10 years ago came straight out of the green vmeme. The community valued cooperation over competition, process over product, equality in decision-making, and expressions of affection more than economic profit. There were many wonderful aspects to this way of being. Hugs and empathy were plentiful, and folks knew how to talk about and support each other having feelings. People felt included and empowered to participate in making decisions that affected them. Lost Valley folk lived simply and frugally while helping our planet and living in close connection with each other.

 

But there were shadow sides to this way of being. Long meetings with few decisions eventually discouraged members with initiative from pursuing their dreams at Lost Valley. The whole group often had difficulty achieving consensus on a given proposal, and so individuals who wanted to accomplish things in the world moved away. Others left because decisions were mediocre; someone who knew nothing about fire safety would have as much power to make a decision on that topic as someone who was an expert. These departures of high-powered, competent members contributed to economic stagnation. The community was barely scraping by, with mounting deferred maintenance on buildings and a high turnover of community members.

 

About three years ago, Lost Valley made a transition intended to call in the yellow vmeme values of effectiveness, ease, and excellence. A few folks stood up at a meeting and said they were all leaving the community if the consensus-based governance structure weren’t changed to give more power to those who were more competent and responsibly engaged in supporting the business side of the community. After discussion, the community agreed to the changes they proposed, and a newly invigorated nonprofit board of directors assumed leadership of the community, creating a hierarchical structure of governance. The board hired an executive director and managers to accomplish the work of Lost Valley’s nonprofit organization, including hosting permaculture educational programs and conferences.

 

I enjoyed many of the changes that came out of this transition. Staff meetings were less likely to be derailed by a long detour into exploring someone’s feelings. The organization established systems of accountability and defined tasks and roles, while staff management learned how to write and follow budgets. These changes set the stage for moving the community forward.

 

But there were shadow sides to this transition, taking the community on a detour back to the orange vmeme, which values hierarchical decision-making, product over process, and profit over heart-centered goals. Volunteers and staff were afraid of speaking truthfully to those above them in the hierarchy for fear of being asked to leave. Managers made autonomous decisions without the input or knowledge of those who were affected by these decisions, and gossip and resentments ran rampant. Community morale was low, which negatively affected the experience of our students in addition to those who lived here. In September 2010 word arrived from the chairman of the board that the community would run out of funds in December, and that unlike other similar challenging moments in previous years, no one had energy or ideas for borrowing funds to make it through the winter.

 

Upon hearing this news, I thought of the many people who have enjoyed and contributed to Lost Valley’s land and mission, and the many more who would like to do so. I felt sad to think that our planet’s ecological movement might lose the zoning of this land, which allows us to live collectively, to host educational programs and conferences, and even to build more homes in an ecovillage cluster rather than on a grid. Saving Lost Valley as a nonprofit dedicated to environmental education felt like a project that was both doable and sufficiently challenging to be of interest. So I stepped up to invest funds and other forms of energy to help keep Lost Valley alive, and I invited others to join me in this project. Our challenge was to figure out what we could do to help Lost Valley finally make the transition to the yellow vmeme, a place of both joy and effectiveness.

 

Small and Slow Solutions

 

The permaculture principle “use small and slow solutions” helped us at this stage. Applied to our homesteads, for example, this principle suggests that we make changes to our land starting at our doorstep, and only slowly implement more sustainable elements of our design as time and funds allow. I saw that Lost Valley was a microcosm containing the world’s challenges, and that I may or may not be able to help solve these problems. Wisdom from an Eckert Tolle book steadied me for the journey ahead: “Whatever is born of stillness, the outcome will be good.” It wouldn’t do any good to give up my meditation practice and run around exuding anxiety about the dire straits we were in. I could move slowly, one step at a time, practicing non-attachment to outcome, finding satisfaction in simply doing my best.

 

Out of this awareness, a “Positive Action Team” was born at Lost Valley. The seven members of this team were folks I felt closest to at the time, and we began by each choosing one small action to implement unilaterally at Lost Valley. One person decided to tell folks she met during the course of her day what she appreciated about them. Another chose to clean up messes he didn’t make. Another decided to build beautiful altars out of natural objects. These individual small actions had a rapid effect on morale at Lost Valley. We felt more connected and hopeful within the first week of beginning this experiment, and within two weeks it appeared that others who weren’t yet part of us were feeling better as well.

 

Our next step was to study and practice sociocracy, a governance system based on a pattern of inter-linked decision-making circles that each contains a small number of people. Meeting together in small groups is more engaging than larger ones because there is more space for each participant to actively participate in the conversational flow. And small groups of five to 10 members are more effective than larger ones at making good decisions quickly.

 

The Positive Action Team became the first sociocratic circle at Lost Valley, and it would later give birth to other circles above and below it in the governance hierarchy before finally disbanding. Rather than have circles expand to include lots of new members, a new sociocratic circle arises when an existing circle elects a representative to start another circle with a mission to focus on a defined aspect of the organization. That representative becomes the voice of the original group to the new group, and selects people to serve on the new group. The new group then elects a representative to the original group. The circles thus become “double-linked,” as shown in the diagram of Lost Valley’s current governance structure.

 

For example, Colin, our representative from the stewardship circle to the community circle, shares decisions that the stewardship circle has made that impact the community. Justin, elected to represent the community circle on the stewardship circle, keeps the stewardship circle informed about what’s happening in the community, and advocates on the community’s behalf. This allows information to flow both ways in the hierarchy of circles, with folks in the lower circles sending information about proposals and decisions to the circles above, and vice versa.

 

Apply Self-Regulation and Accept Feedback

 

These double-linked circles facilitate the feedback referred to in the permaculture principle “apply self-regulation and accept feedback.” An example of this principle in the visible world is placing electric meters at the entrance to one’s house, rather than behind some bushes in an obscure corner outside the house. That way residents can see how much power is being used as they leave home, and respond to this feedback by regulating how many appliances they leave plugged in.

 

A sociocratic example of this flow of feedback was when someone informed the community circle that some people were getting ill, and they thought it might be due to problems with our well water. The community circle formed a temporary circle called the “water circle,” tasked with researching the issue and coming up with a proposed solution. The water circle reported back their suggested course of action to the community circle, who liked it enough to refer it up to the stewardship circle, who liked it enough to refer it up to the Board of Directors. The folks in the water circle presented their ideas in each of these circles, and in the space of just a few weeks, the Board approved their suggestions for funding.

 

The “apply self-regulation and accept feedback” principle benefits from transparency, one of sociocracy’s core values. Sociocratic governance calls for open, honest communication about everything from financial books to feelings people hold about each other. With this value in mind, I met with the chairman of the board when the Positive Action Team was just starting up to request access to economic information about Lost Valley so that we could make informed backup plans in case Lost Valley ran out of funds.

 

Sociocracy also encourages groups to apply self-regulation and accept feedback by requiring three steps of those charged with accomplishing tasks: planning, implementation, and evaluation. Before electing someone to do something, the circle clearly defines the nature of the task, establishes a timetable, and creates a plan for evaluating the results. Sociocratic circles consist of folks with expertise and/or strong stakes in the task at hand, and they receive creative latitude to accomplish their task as they deem best without being micromanaged by the circle above them in the hierarchy. The higher circle can intervene, however, if the circle charged with a task goes sufficiently off track or doesn’t get the job done on schedule. When tasks or meetings are finished, we take time to evaluate both the process and product so that the group can learn to do things better in the future.

 

Sociocratic elections encourage people to give positive feedback to each other by asking members of circles to talk openly about why they want to elect someone for a task. The Positive Action Team employed a sociocratic election to create a financial circle charged with learning about the economic situation at Lost Valley. To elect the Positive Action Team’s representative to this financial circle, we passed around slips of paper upon which each person wrote their name and the name of the person they wanted to head up this new circle. Then a facilitator asked each person why they nominated the person they chose. During a second go-round, people were allowed to change their nominations based on the reasons they had heard from others. The facilitator then suggested someone to head up the circle based not strictly on the number of nominations, but rather on the strength of the reasons, and asked each person whether they had any “reasoned and paramount objections” to this suggested person. In other words, a person would have to have a good and strong reason to block someone’s election, not simply that he or she would prefer someone else. Once someone is elected, he or she is asked if they want to accept the job.

 

This sociocratic nominating method resembles the consensus decision-making process, but the wording “Do you have any reasoned or paramount objections?” encourages even untrained people to use a block well. If someone does have an objection, or if the person who is elected doesn’t want to serve, then the facilitator suggests someone else. We’ve found in practice that objections have been rare and fairly easy to respond to, and that almost everyone who is asked to serve chooses to do so. The mood of a group after elections is often one of connection and trust because we’ve taken time to tell each other why we love and respect each other. The person who is charged with creating a new circle and executing the assigned tasks knows he or she is supported by the group, and can act with well-earned authority. In this way, sociocracy is both participatory, in that each person in a circle has an equal voice in selecting someone to do the work, and effective, in that those who are selected to do the work are given the power to act.

 

Creatively Use and Respond to Change

 

This permaculture principle keeps us light on our feet, looking for the good in even challenging situations. The local and organic food movements, for example, are creative responses to the toxicity and increasing expense of using petroleum products for growing food. Sociocracy is also known by another name, dynamic governance, because it is especially useful in times of rapid change. In the year since we formed our first sociocratic circle at Lost Valley, much has improved here in our morale, our facilities, and our quality of life. From a community that had dwindled to just a handful of folks over the winter, we now have 40 people living here and a couple of new businesses to provide employment for them. We’ve renovated many buildings, cleaned and de-cluttered everywhere else, and upgraded our water systems. Several households plan to build their own homes on the land, so that we will no longer be a community exclusively of renters. Our cash flow has been positive since the beginning of this year, even through the winter when Lost Valley has typically lost money. I feel grateful for the sociocratic governance methods that have facilitated this joyful and effective progress.

  • Length: 45:08 minutes (41.31 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

The Pathology of Fear: Blowback is an 'Ill Wind'...

program: 
Air Cascadia
program date: 
Fri, 04/19/2013

“This entire week we’ve been in a pretty direct confrontation with evil,” Secretary of State John Kerry

 

“Direct confrontation with evil”? Is that what we call it?  Is that how we are supposed to understand the events in Boston?

When a woman in a village in Waziristan, attending a family wedding, wakes up in the rubble to find her children’s poor ruined bodies strewn around her among the broken flowers, does she think, ‘Good thing they weren’t Americans or this would have been a tragic confrontation with evil…’ And yet he drone strikes continue.  The US continues to pour military hardware into Israel which in turn pours it down on the Palestinian people.  The number of the dead grows.  Palestinians languish in prisons built on their own land.

Around the world the carnage continues; we wreak horror on our own habitat, rendering it uninhabitable – except by the poor who have no choice.

That’s terror.  That’s it’s real face.

What we suffer here in ‘The Homeland’ is madness.

And nothing more.

This morning the country woke to learn that

‘The suspects have been widely identified by law enforcement officials as brothers from a Russian region near Chechnya. But an uncle, Ruslan Tsarni, who lives in the Washington suburb of Montgomery Village, said the men had emigrated almost a decade ago and had lived near Boston ever since.

 

Tamerlan Tsarnaev was killed following a convenience store robbery  overnight, during a car chase and gun battle in Watertown in which improvised hand grenades were tossed from a carjacked Mercedes and one police officer was killed; he was 26 and was the one wearing the black baseball cap in the surveillance footage the FBI released Thursday.

 

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, the one filmed wearing a white ball cap backwards, escaped and was the focus of a phenomenal manhunt that prompted officials to stop all mass transit systems and order everyone in Boston and several suburbs to stay indoors.’

  • Length: 14:43 minutes (13.47 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Americans Gone Wilding: The Ambient Terror Between the Lines

program: 
Air Cascadia
program date: 
Thu, 04/18/2013

It's all there...but we are hypnotized by the bright beads.  Our demons are in the twisted connections in between.  Our demons are not looking in the windows while we sleep.

They are windows and they are also the sleep.

  • Length: 29:08 minutes (26.68 MB)
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'Improvised Exploitation Device'? the Explosive Power of the Words We Choose to Use...

program: 
Air Cascadia
program date: 
Tue, 04/16/2013

Monday, April 15th, marked Patriot's Day (or Patriots' Day) 2013.  The holiday  commemorates the battles of Lexington and Concord, which were fought near Boston in 1775. Patriot's Day is annually held on the third Monday of April. It should not be confused with Patriot Day, held on September 11 to mark the anniversary of terrorist attacks in the USA in 2001.  It especially should not be confused with Patriot Day..  So, putting Humpty Dumpty back together we have Patriots day/ Patriot Day, Tax Day and one of America's pre-eminent sporting events, the Boston Marathon. 

 

With little official information to guide them and no advance warning, , members of Congress strongly suggested on Monday that the deadly Boston Marathon explosions were acts of terrorism and vowed to bring anyone responsible to justice.

Okay, but whence the terrorists? 

 

It looks a lot like a Love Letter from the Sovereign Citizens movement. But since consumers of mainstream media are more familiar with the stereotypical Middle Eastern Arabic bad guy with the hot-wired vest, that is exactly what is being sold to a cowed and highly suggestible public.

Why the plain hell did they have to call the things “I.E.D.”s?  Most people’s first thought upon hearing those three little letters, is ‘Yikes! Iraqis!’

Why?

 

Before you think too hard and too long about the answer to that one, take a look at this:

A 36-year-old software engineer who shot and killed a California Highway Patrol (CHP) officer last fall was bipolar and held antigovernment “sovereign citizen” views, an investigation by the Contra Costa County Sheriff’s Office has concluded.

Christopher Lacy’s ideological ties to the sovereign citizen movement, whose adherents generally believe they are immune to federal tax and many criminal laws, were documented with more than 100 interviews and search warrants. But the seven-month investigation failed to determine why he shot CHP Trooper Kenyon Youngstrom on September 4th.

 

The trooper was fatally shot at close range moments after stopping Lacy’s vehicle, which had an “obstructed license plate” as it traveled on busy Interstate 680 near Alamo, Calif., the sheriff’s office said in a just-released summary statement. That was only the latest murder of a law enforcement official during a traffic stop by a sovereign citizen, most of whom believe the government has no right to regulate their driving. On May 20, 2010, two West Memphis, Ark., police officers were slain by a father-son team of sovereigns during a routine traffic stop.

The FBI has publicly classified the sovereign citizens movement as “domestic terrorist” in nature.

As part of their investigation into the police shooting, Contra Costa County sheriff’s detectives searched Lacy’s trailer in Corning, Calif., about 200 miles from the shooting, where they seized six computers containing encrypted files.

“Investigators found a large amount of literature on Libertarianism and the sovereign citizen movement,” the sheriff’s office summary statement said.  Lacy, it added, “had strong views” about gun rights and didn’t “agree with the role of government.” “Lacy downloaded literature on sovereign citizen [beliefs],” Detective Sgt. Jose Beltran of the sheriff’s homicide squad said in the statement.  “Although he never declared himself a ‘sovereign citizen,’ he certainly shared those viewpoints.”

 

On Lacy’s computers, investigators found what they described as a “wish list” that included a reference to putting “mud on [a] license plate,” the statement said. Also on Lacy’s list were references to solar panels, water filters, sleeping bags and bulletproof vests. He also had visited a website describing how to make homemade explosives, it said.

  • Length: 14:16 minutes (13.05 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Comments

membership means more

your threat of quitting your membership gives me two options for analysis:

1) you gave money to Theresa via KBOO.

2) if Theresa died tomorrow, you'd give up your membership.

my interpretation

1) that's cool, man.  you support community-based radio based solely on your dedication to one weekly half-hour show. that demonstrates that Theresa's voice represents/intrigues you (and many, many others); however you don't feel represented by any one of the other 500 people who volunteer their time and energy in the 24/7 endevour, and you don't value the input (and miraculous existence!) of the other 5-10,000 members and ten times as many listeners; neither do you support the KBOO mission of including as many underrepresented voices as possible on the air, with natural turnover, schedule changes and opportunities as new people arrive.  Membership gives you the power to affect the decision-making, which is why you gave money to Theresa via KBOO; and, by golly, you will do everything in your power to keep her on the air, and you want the KBOO website visitors to know how you feel when they read the comments.  You'd even like them to join you in your fight.

2) wow.

my opinion

Personally, Theresa's show is one of my  favourites and there are plenty of shows that I not only don't like or don't listen to, but also complain about out loud.  It's my radio station, and, like my family, I will not be quiet when they need to shape up or ship out.

writing inflammatory statements on the webpage will remain simply that: inflammatory statements with a reaction or two from trolls (see the 20 pages of Anonymous written about me because of the audio I submitted that Jenka edited), which, in the end, result in: NOTHING.  If you want to chat with others online, that's fine, but you should know that nothing said here is considered in the Committee meetings. It's just an informal public forum, not policy binding.

my advice

Instead of threatening us (volunteers, members, listeners and our very existence), why not use your valuable internet time to phrase it as, for example, a question to which one of us could easily respond:  "Have there been any changes to Theresa's show?  I noticed lately that it has been preemented or even cut.  It is my favourite show. [I fear Air Cascadia will take its place--not necessary but very telling that you chose Chris' page to write it--ed.]. "  You can copy the question to Theresa's email (though I know from experience she doesn't respond) and/or print it out and put it in her cubby hole at the station. And/or show up to the meetings.  And/or call Theresa during her show--she takes calls, you know.  Ask her if she'll train or mentor you to do the same kind of work she does.

p.s.  Air Cascadia basically is the AM News is Chris Andreae: i was engineering {i'm flattered that you liked it}and was very sad when it was cut--but that is the way of the station; we adhere and adapt to the ever-fluctuating needs of the larger community--but i watched, with great pleasure, as it morphed into Air Cascadia.  Though i adore Dennis Bernstein, 15 less minutes of his voice is no skin off my back. 

Highting!

Crystal

air cascadia

im a conservative right wing trucker and i think cris andrae is the greatest broadcaster on the radio. i try to listen when i dont need traffic reports.
her scathing commentary is the best. i would join kboo but i fear america will become too weak and barry will force me to find a green job soon . keep up the good work
michael j

The anchor news program

The anchor news program Democracy Now, conveiniently aired at 11 AM so that all could tune in was moved to 7 AM with a result that most if not all of the people who work nights won't be tuning in as they are still sleeping. Also missed the 40th anniversary bash as it was inconveinently held from 4 to 10 Pm, on a weekday, which would exclude anyone working swing from attending unless they took a day off. Why couldn't this have been held on a Saturday or Sunday?
Air Cascadia is a very rough and unpolished program that leaves me tuning to OPB or just turning it off.
The choppy, emergent voice of Cris Andreae is certainly a large part in that.
If it is true that Press Watch will be axed for this then it will be an easy decision to withhold future pledges from this listener.

What happened to Presswatch?

Is Air Cascadia taking over what Therisa has been doing? If so, I may give up my membership. First, the am news gets axed to accomodate Democracy Now, now is Presswatch going under the plow?

 

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