Air Cascadia

Coming Soon

 

Hosted by

Episode Archive

Air Cascadia on 03/16/15

Program: 
Air Cascadia
Air date: 
Mon, 03/16/2015 - 10:00am - 10:15am
Short Description: 
Local News

Air Cascadia on 03/13/15

Program: 
Air Cascadia
Air date: 
Fri, 03/13/2015 - 10:00am - 10:15am
Short Description: 
Local News

Air Cascadia on 03/12/15

Program: 
Air Cascadia
Air date: 
Thu, 03/12/2015 - 10:00am - 10:15am
Short Description: 
Local News

Air Cascadia on 03/11/15

Program: 
Air Cascadia
Air date: 
Wed, 03/11/2015 - 10:00am - 10:15am
Short Description: 
Local News

Air Cascadia on 03/09/15

Program: 
Air Cascadia
Air date: 
Mon, 03/09/2015 - 10:00am - 10:15am
Short Description: 
Local News

Air Cascadia on 03/05/15

Program: 
Air Cascadia
Air date: 
Thu, 03/05/2015 - 10:00am - 10:15am
Short Description: 
Local News

Air Cascadia on 03/04/15

Program: 
Air Cascadia
Air date: 
Wed, 03/04/2015 - 10:00am - 10:15am
Short Description: 
Local News

Air Cascadia on 03/03/15

Program: 
Air Cascadia
Air date: 
Tue, 03/03/2015 - 10:00am - 10:15am
Short Description: 
Local News

Air Cascadia on 03/02/15

Program: 
Air Cascadia
Air date: 
Mon, 03/02/2015 - 10:00am - 10:15am
Short Description: 
Local News

Air Cascadia on 02/27/15

Program: 
Air Cascadia
Air date: 
Fri, 02/27/2015 - 10:00am - 10:15am
Short Description: 
Local News

Audio

Lessons from Dane County: Pipelines, Profit and Public Health in Wisconsin...

program: 
Air Cascadia
program date: 
Mon, 02/16/2015
Before a few words regarding the crimes of Enbridge:
What kind of people pay ttentioon to a pack of media weaselcunts who try convict and sentence their state's Governor before the investigation has even begun?
Oregonian weaselcunts, that's who.
When we have  Republican Governor signing off of Death Train, the Pacific Connector, oil freight terminals poisoning the Pcific Ocean, When we have the eastern deserts burning coal for thousands of miles around the train tracks, when we have mass extinctions of wildlife, when we have cut the last living tree, killed off every living thing...
Will you be happy then?
You got rid of Kitz, one of our greatest statesmen.
History will spit in your face.

I can't even start to write about  the Enbridge pipeline.  Have a listen...it's all there.
  • Genre: Blues
  • Length: 15:11 minutes (10.42 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 96Kbps (CBR)

The Transpacific Partnership: Corporations Will Write The Laws

program: 
Air Cascadia
program date: 
Fri, 02/13/2015
Here's some more material to have a bit of a Think about:

A Few Global Cultural Treasures We Will Lose For 20 Years Under the TPP
3 days ago 
Jeremy Malcolm
Electronic Frontier Foundation
 
 
 
What do Japan's Blue Sky Library, Malaysia's answer to John Wayne, and the first recorded composer from New Zealand, all have in common? They could all disappear from their countries' public domain for the next 20 years, if the current agreement on copyright term extension in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) holds.
 
You may have read in the news over the past year about how the public domain has recently been enriched with some exciting new additions, such as Sherlock Holmes and—in countries with shorter copyright terms, such as Canada—James Bond, passing out of copyright, freeing them for reissue, adaptation, and remix.
 
But what you probably haven't heard before is that six of the countries presently negotiating the TPP, and who have reportedly caved in and agreed on copyright term extension, would have been about to contribute cultural icons of their own to the public domain, enriching their own countries and the world with home-grown art, music, and film that is otherwise at risk of being forgotten.
 
These countries are Brunei, Canada, New Zealand, Malaysia, Japan, and Vietnam. Each of these fascinating countries has such a depth of creative talent that an entire article could easily be devoted to each of them, exploring the public domain works that the world can look forward to—or that we will miss out on for another 20 years, if the TPP passes. But for now, a little taste from each country will have to do.
 
 
The Group of Seven were an art movement of the early 20th century whose distinctively Canadian landscape paintings are collected in galleries around Canada and the world. In the United States only one of the members of the group died long enough ago that his works have reached the public domain, but in Canada it is a different story—within a decade, the entire artistic output of the Group of Seven will be freely available to the public, allowing anyone to restore, reproduce and share these timeless masterpieces.
 
That is, unless the TPP is passed and the term of copyright in Canada is extended. In that case, you can hold your breath for another twenty years.
 
New Zealand
 
Since 2010, New Zealanders have finally been able to perform and reuse the works of their most important yet under-appreciated early composer, Alfred Hill, without asking for permission from his estate. Hill was the very first antipodean composer to have a chamber work committed to record, and some of those same precious early recordings have been preserved by the National Archive of Australia, and brought to the world free of copyright restrictions.
 
Although these crackly old recordings may not seem to be of wide interest in themselves, imagine the potential for these works to be brought back to life in another medium such as film, as the songs of Annette Hanshaw were in Nina Paley's masterful Sita Sings the Blues.
 
Malaysia and Brunei
 
Actor, director, writer and composer P. Ramlee is truly a Malaysian superstar, who starred in over 60 movies during Malay filmmaking's golden age in the 1950s and 1960s. He remains a cult figure in Malaysia, Brunei and Singapore—John Wayne may have a star on Hollywood's Walk of Fame, but Ramlee has an entire street in central Kuala Lumpur. Although he died in 1973, many of his films have already come out of copyright in Malaysia and Brunei, and others continue to do so. An example is Seniman Bujang Lapok (The Three Worn Out Actor Bachelors), a metafictional comedy from 1961 that Ramlee also wrote, directed, and composed for.
 
A point of note is that in most of the TPP countries (Canada a notable exception), films are protected from the date of publication, not from the death of the author. That makes an enormous difference, when the “author” of a film can include whoever is the longest-lived of the the principal director, the author of the screenplay, the author of the dialogue, and the composer of its soundtrack. This is why so few European films have ever reached the public domain, and why Malaysian and Bruneian film lovers are far more fortunate—for now.
 
Japan
 
Just as the United States has its well-known Project Gutenburg that digitizes and distributes public domain literature, so too other TPP countries such as Australia, Canada and New Zealand have sister projects that focus on works from local authors, as well as those that can legally be made available sooner to residents of those countries that have shorter copyright terms. Japan has such an archive also; the Aozora Bunko, which translates as Blue Sky Library.
 
Over the last three years, Aozora Bunko has celebrated the release of classic works from authors such as historical novelist Eiji Yoshikawa, philosopher Kiyoshi Miki, and poet Tatsuji Miyoshi. But the curators of the archive are worried about its future, with the shadow of copyright term extension under the TPP, noting that of 572 authors whose works they have published, about half would have to be taken offline if the copyright term is extended retroactively. (Even if not retroactive, the extension of copyright would mean no new Aozora Bunko releases until 2036.)
 
Vietnam
 
Under a regime in which copyright in film lasts for 50 rather than 70 years from publication, films made in 1965 are now coming out of copyright. In the case of Vietnam, this of course falls in the middle of the Vietnam War, and for this reason the Vietnamese films of that period, which include both documentaries and dramas, are of immense historical and cultural interest.
 
Such a film, due to return to the public domain next year, is Nổi gió (Rising Wind), directed by Huy Thành, which jointly won the Golden Lotus award for best feature film at the inaugural Vietnam Film Festival in 1970. Considered as the first movie of Vietnam's revolutionary cinema, and adapted from a play of the same name, it tells the tragic story of a family torn apart by war, from a very different perspective than shown in American films from that period or since.
 
Why Should Americans Care?
 
It might be assumed that an extension of the copyright term in the TPP wouldn't affect the United States, because our law already provides for that same copyright term. But although the impact might not be so immediate, the United States would still lose; for one thing, it would lose the flexibility to reduce its own copyright term back to the Berne Convention minimum term of life plus 50 years.
 
This isn't such an unlikely prospect as you might think. Maria Pallante, Register of Copyrights, wrote in 2013 about her vision of the Next Great Copyright Act, including the suggestion that:
 
perhaps the law could shift the burden of the last twenty years from the user to the copyright owner, so that at least in some instances, copyright owners would have to assert their continued interest in exploiting the work by registering with the Copyright Office in a timely manner. And if they did not, the works would enter the public domain.
 
In her draft report for the European Parliament, Julia Reda went further [PDF], suggesting that the European Commission “harmonise the term of protection of copyright to a duration that does not exceed the current international standards set out in the Berne Convention” (ie. 50 years from death). So our lawmakers should not be too hasty in ruling out the future reform of the copyright term, by cementing current law into a multilateral trade agreement.
 
It is true that the US already has trade deals with other countries that do require a life plus 70 year minimum—but these are largely with countries (such as Jordan, Australia, and Singapore) who were forced into changing their own law as a cost of entry into that agreement, even against the recommendations [PDF] of their own domestic advisers. Those countries would hardly be likely to put up much of a fight if the US acceded to a joint relaxation of the copyright term obligation.
 
But if the US locks the same obligation into the TPP and TTIP (Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership), that dynamic changes, and it will become much more difficult for the United States to reconsider later down the road, without the much more complicated task of coordinating this with both the copyright-maximalist European Commission as well as eleven other countries of the Pacific rim.1
 
The Good News
 
So that's the bad news. But there's also some very good news: any of the six countries above can stop this deal! If even one of the countries—Brunei, Canada, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand or Vietnam— is brave enough to stand up to the United States and block the extension of the copyright term, then that ill-advised deal could still fall through. If you are from one of those countries, you can call your Member of Parliament, or your trade ministry,2 and demand that they save the public domain, by retaining the life plus 50 year copyright term that is your right under the Berne Convention. If you are in the US, your best avenue to stop term extension, and the TPP's other anti-user threats, is to support our Fast Track action.
  • Genre: Blues
  • Length: 10:16 minutes (7.05 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 96Kbps (CBR)

Scotus, Potus, and Robert MacLean...

program: 
Air Cascadia
program date: 
Thu, 02/12/2015
On your mark..Get set…BLOW!
Because the Supreme Court this week ruled on the wide of Federal Air Marshall Robert Maclean.  What this means for you and I is simply this:  it is no longer legal for lawmakers to make laws after the fact.  If fyou reveal a serious breach of workplace safety, for example, it is no longer legal for a law to suddenly appear making your actions illegal.
And we have Robert Maclean to thank.
This is a major  victory in its implications for future whistleblower cases. The Court’s decision in Department of Homeland Security v. Robert MacLean curtails the government’s manipulation of pseudo-classified information to punish whistleblowers, and strengthens the Whistleblower Protection Act (WPA).
 
In July 2003, TSA alerted all marshals of a possible hijacking plot. Soon after, TSA sent an unclassified, open-air text message to marshals’ cell phones canceling several months of missions to save on hotel costs. Fearing such cancellations in the midst of a hijacking alert created a danger to the flying public, veteran Air Marshal Robert MacLean tried to get TSA to change its decision.
 
After hitting a dead end, MacLean spoke anonymously to MSNBC, who published a critical story. Only 24 hours later, and after 11 members of Congress voiced concern, TSA reversed itself, putting marshals back on the flights. A year later, MacLean appeared on TV in disguise to criticize agency policies he felt made it easier for passengers to recognize undercover marshals. The TSA recognized MacLean’s voice and discovered he had also released the unclassified 2003 text message. He was fired in April 2006.
 
MacLean discovered that months after firing him, TSA had retroactively classified as “security sensitive information” (SSI) the unclassified text message he had leaked. SSI is a designation created by TSA via administrative memo, and had no basis in law. TSA decided nonetheless that leaking a retroactively SSI-classified document was cause enough to fire a federal worker. MacLean fought back.
  • Genre: Blues
  • Length: 11:00 minutes (7.56 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 96Kbps (CBR)

Laughing All The Way From The Bank...

program: 
Air Cascadia
program date: 
Tue, 02/10/2015
Here is the nut of it


"60 Minutes" reports in "The Swiss Leaks": "The largest and most damaging Swiss bank heist in history doesn't involve stolen money but stolen computer files with more than 100,000 names tied to Swiss bank accounts at HSBC, the second largest commercial bank in the world. A 37-year-old computer security specialist named Hervé Falciani stole the huge cache of data in 2007 and gave it to the French government. It's now being used to go after tax cheats all over the world. '60 Minutes', working with a group called the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, obtained the leaked files. They show the bank did business with a collection of international outlaws: tax dodgers, arms dealers and drug smugglers -- offering a rare glimpse into the highly secretive world of Swiss banking."

But it gets better:

Hervé Falciani’s long, strange journey from bank computer expert to jailed fugitive to candidate for office to spokesman for whistleblowers
 
They almost had him.
 
On December 22, 2008, Swiss federal police handcuffed 36-year-old Hervé Falciani, a systems specialist they suspected of stealing data from HSBC Private Bank (Suisse), his employer, and trying to sell it to banks in Lebanon.  They seized his computer, searched his Geneva home and interrogated him for hours.
 
Then – on the condition that he return the next day for more questioning – they let him go.
 
And go he did.  Renting a car, Falciani picked up his wife and daughter and drove straight to France.  There he began downloading vast amounts of HSBC data that he had stored on remote servers and that has since been causing havoc for wealthy people the world over who use offshore accounts to hide money from taxation: client names and account holdings as well as notes about the bank’s conversations with them.
 
That day was the pivot point in a long, strange journey for Falciani, a colorful figure who has since moved from country to country on the lam from Swiss authorities – and possibly from criminal elements who mean him harm.  He presents himself as a whistleblower and has attracted wide media attention; he even ran unsuccessfully for the European Parliament.  He has been known to use an assumed identity, to wear disguises, and to appear in public with bodyguards.  He has been jailed – and indicted:  In December, the Swiss attorney general charged Falciani with data theft from HSBC, saying his intent was “cashing in.”
 
Falciani’s HSBC data trove ended up first in the hands of authorities in France, which then indicted London-based HSBC for illegal direct marketing to French nationals, money laundering and facilitating tax fraud.
  • Length: 12:08 minutes (8.33 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 96Kbps (CBR)

911: There is Nothing More to Say...It Just Remains to be Heard

program: 
Air Cascadia
program date: 
Mon, 02/09/2015
U.S. Militarization of Police:  Erosion of Civil Liberties, Police Brutality, Resistance,
 
Waldemar Perez was the speaker last Saturday  at Portland Community College.  Perez lit into U.S. police militarization in the post 9/11 political landscape. Perez, an engineer and member of Architects and Engineers for 9/11 Truth, has recently directed his focus toward the unsettling outcome of the 9/11 attacks including the continued trend of U.S. police militarization, the erosion of civil liberties and the unending war on terror.
 
Perez’s first of a two-part presentation will occur February 7th at 3:00 PM on PCC’s Sylvania campus in Room 108 of the Sciences and Technology building.  The second part is entitled “9/11 and the Geopolitical Aftermath, A Global Agenda”, which will occur March 7th at the same time and place.  PCC 9/11 Studies Club is an education and outreach effort serving students, faculty and the community.  Their current mid-term lecture and discussion series is entitled “9/11, Look for Yourself”. All meetings are free of charge and open to the public every Saturday at 3:00 PM at the same location.
 
It’s all there; the rest of the world knows; Americans have opted out of their own truth, bought into the “official report” and paid for it with surrender to the USA Patriot Act: it’s all there…
  • Length: 11:51 minutes (8.13 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 96Kbps (CBR)

Can't See the Trees for the GMO No!

program: 
Air Cascadia
program date: 
Thu, 02/05/2015
It's the Quote of the Week... We stand here beneath a warm, wet winter, helpless before the disaster we have caused.  

"Global Justice Ecology Project’s Ruddy Turnstone from Florida remarks, “ArborGen and the government may think they have won this round, but there is already a huge anti-GMO movement. There are also forest protection groups, Indigenous Peoples, birders, foresters, scientists, parents, hikers, and many others who do not want the forests contaminated by GE trees. A great many of them will take action to ensure these trees are never planted.”
 
In 2013, when the USDA called for public comments on another ArborGen request to commercialize a GE Eucalyptus tree (a decision still pending), they received comments at the rate of 10,000 to one opposing the industry request. By simply refusing to regulate this new GE pine, the USDA has cut the public out of the process completely.  In 2013, a conference on Tree Biotechnology in Asheville, NC was disrupted for its entire 5 days by anti-GE tree activists, and there were multiple arrests.
 
The Campaign to STOP GE Trees is an international alliance of organizations mobilized to protect forests and biodiversity and to support communities threatened by the dangerous release of genetically engineered trees into the environment."
  • Length: 10:47 minutes (7.41 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 96Kbps (CBR)

'A Backpack, a Bear and Eight Cases of Vodka' - Lev Golinkin reports from the fringes of PR

program: 
Air Cascadia
program date: 
Wed, 02/04/2015
 Today’s guest, Lev Golinkin is the author of the recently-released A Backpack, a Bear, and Eight Crates of Vodka, a memoir of Soviet Ukraine, which he left as a child refugee. See New York Times review: "Fleeing Ukraine With Little More Than Wit."
 
    Golinkin just wrote the piece "The Humanitarian Crisis in Eastern Ukraine Demands Attention," which states: "According to the latest, and admittedly conservative, UN estimates, the conflict in the southeastern Ukrainian provinces of Donetsk and Luhansk (Donbass) has resulted in over 5,000 deaths and 1.5 million refugees. For the forgotten 5.2 million who remain in Donbass, life since April 2014 has been a deadly kaleidoscope of warlords and armies, foreign fighters, shifting allegiances, morphing front lines, and indiscriminate carnage. ... Kiev continues to add layers to its blockade, making it nearly impossible for food and medicine to reach the 3 million civilians in rebel-controlled areas of Donbass..."
  • Length: 14:11 minutes (9.74 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 96Kbps (CBR)

"Money Makes The World Go 'Round"...because Money Goes around the World...Hear This!

program: 
Air Cascadia
program date: 
Tue, 02/03/2015

 
"Obama's six-year $478 billion public works program would provide upgrades for the nation's highways, bridges and transit systems, in an effort to tap into bipartisan support for spending on badly needed repairs. Half of that money would come from a one-time mandatory tax on profits that U.S. companies have amassed overseas, according to White House officials who spoke on condition of anonymity before the budget was released.” Thus the official word from on high.
Word from the real world comes to us from James Henry
    Now an investigative journalist, Henry is featured in the film “We’re Not Broke,” which tells the story of U.S. corporations dodging billions of dollars in income tax and is available on Netflix.  He said today: "The proposal is not as bad as what Bush did in 2004, but if you keep doing this, you in effect repeal the corporate income tax. Contrary to claims back then, in 2004, it didn't create any jobs. Citibank brought back money and used it to buy back shares, so it benefited management. And corporations don't actually just keep money overseas, they end up borrowing against it. What we've had is an erosion of the tax rate for corporations since the late 70s. What's needed is a meaningful progressive income tax. Instead, we have a system of 'tax competition' -- one country after another lowering tax rates. This year, with Burger King and Chrysler, has been a big year for inversions and the administration did very little to stop that.  What we should be doing is working with other countries to strengthen corporate tax collection. Instead, we keep lowering ours -- and it hurts us, but it really hurts poorer countries.”
  • Length: 30:00 minutes (20.6 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 96Kbps (CBR)

99rise takes Scotus by storm, Jeffrey Sterling Wins by Losing out to Justice Corrupted

program: 
Air Cascadia
program date: 
Tue, 01/27/2015
Yesterday afternoon CIA whistleblower Jeffrey Sterling was convicted of all nine of the remaining counts he was facing.
 
ExposeFacts has stayed on this trial of the century - any century, really - right from the get-go up until the bitter end.  and it was bitter indeed.  But this is merely the theater that sets the stage for Republican's romp through the fields of freedom.  It is going to get unbelievably worse.   


Norman Solomon writes: “Many of the two-dozen witnesses from the Central Intelligence Agency conveyed smoldering resentment that a whistleblower or journalist might depict the institution as a bungling outfit unworthy of its middle name. Some witnesses seemed to put Sterling and journalist James Risen roughly in the same nefarious category -- Sterling for allegedly leaking classified information that put the CIA in a bad light, and Risen for reporting it. . . . If Sterling goes to prison, a major reason will be that the CIA leadership is angry about being portrayed as an intelligence gang that can’t shoot straight.”
  • Length: 13:49 minutes (9.49 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 96Kbps (CBR)

Taking 'Merlin' to Court: Will Journalism Ever be the Same?

program: 
Air Cascadia
program date: 
Thu, 01/15/2015
What follows is gleaned from firedoglake.  It complements David Swanson's terrific interview this morning on 'Air Cascadia'

Jeffrey who?
 
Some people have heard of James Risen, a New York Times reporter who refused to name his source for a story. Damn right. Good for him. But what was the story and whom did the government want named as a source? Ah. Those questions might seem obvious, but the reporting on James Risen has avoided them like the plague for years and years now. And the independent media is not always as good at creating a story as it is at improving on stories in the corporate press.
 
Jeffrey Sterling went to Congress with his story. He was a CIA case officer. He is accused of having taken his story to James Risen. The prosecution is quite clearly establishing, against its own interest, during the course of this trial already, that numerous people were in on the story and could have taken it to Risen. If Sterling is to be proved guilty of the non-crime of blowing the whistle on a crime, the prosecution has yet to hint at how that will be done.
 
But what is the story? What is the crime that Sterling exposed for that tiny sliver of the population that’s interested enough to have listened? (Sure, Risen’s book was a “best seller” but that’s a low hurdle; not a single prospective juror in Alexandria had read the book; even a witness involved in the case testified Wednesday that he’d only read the one relevant chapter.)
 
The story is this. The CIA drew up plans for a key part of a nuclear bomb (what a CIA officer on Wednesday described in his testimony as “the crown jewels” of a nuclear weapons program), inserted flaws in the plans, and then had a Russian give those flawed plans to Iran.
 
During the trial on Wednesday morning, the prosecution’s witnesses made clear both that aiding Iran in developing a part of a bomb would be illegal under U.S. export control laws, and that they were aware at the time that there was the possibility of what they were doing constituting just such aid.
  • Length: 14:04 minutes (9.66 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Stereo 44kHz 96Kbps (CBR)

Comments

membership means more

your threat of quitting your membership gives me two options for analysis:

1) you gave money to Theresa via KBOO.

2) if Theresa died tomorrow, you'd give up your membership.

my interpretation

1) that's cool, man.  you support community-based radio based solely on your dedication to one weekly half-hour show. that demonstrates that Theresa's voice represents/intrigues you (and many, many others); however you don't feel represented by any one of the other 500 people who volunteer their time and energy in the 24/7 endevour, and you don't value the input (and miraculous existence!) of the other 5-10,000 members and ten times as many listeners; neither do you support the KBOO mission of including as many underrepresented voices as possible on the air, with natural turnover, schedule changes and opportunities as new people arrive.  Membership gives you the power to affect the decision-making, which is why you gave money to Theresa via KBOO; and, by golly, you will do everything in your power to keep her on the air, and you want the KBOO website visitors to know how you feel when they read the comments.  You'd even like them to join you in your fight.

2) wow.

my opinion

Personally, Theresa's show is one of my  favourites and there are plenty of shows that I not only don't like or don't listen to, but also complain about out loud.  It's my radio station, and, like my family, I will not be quiet when they need to shape up or ship out.

writing inflammatory statements on the webpage will remain simply that: inflammatory statements with a reaction or two from trolls (see the 20 pages of Anonymous written about me because of the audio I submitted that Jenka edited), which, in the end, result in: NOTHING.  If you want to chat with others online, that's fine, but you should know that nothing said here is considered in the Committee meetings. It's just an informal public forum, not policy binding.

my advice

Instead of threatening us (volunteers, members, listeners and our very existence), why not use your valuable internet time to phrase it as, for example, a question to which one of us could easily respond:  "Have there been any changes to Theresa's show?  I noticed lately that it has been preemented or even cut.  It is my favourite show. [I fear Air Cascadia will take its place--not necessary but very telling that you chose Chris' page to write it--ed.]. "  You can copy the question to Theresa's email (though I know from experience she doesn't respond) and/or print it out and put it in her cubby hole at the station. And/or show up to the meetings.  And/or call Theresa during her show--she takes calls, you know.  Ask her if she'll train or mentor you to do the same kind of work she does.

p.s.  Air Cascadia basically is the AM News is Chris Andreae: i was engineering {i'm flattered that you liked it}and was very sad when it was cut--but that is the way of the station; we adhere and adapt to the ever-fluctuating needs of the larger community--but i watched, with great pleasure, as it morphed into Air Cascadia.  Though i adore Dennis Bernstein, 15 less minutes of his voice is no skin off my back. 

Highting!

Crystal

air cascadia

im a conservative right wing trucker and i think cris andrae is the greatest broadcaster on the radio. i try to listen when i dont need traffic reports.
her scathing commentary is the best. i would join kboo but i fear america will become too weak and barry will force me to find a green job soon . keep up the good work
michael j

The anchor news program

The anchor news program Democracy Now, conveiniently aired at 11 AM so that all could tune in was moved to 7 AM with a result that most if not all of the people who work nights won't be tuning in as they are still sleeping. Also missed the 40th anniversary bash as it was inconveinently held from 4 to 10 Pm, on a weekday, which would exclude anyone working swing from attending unless they took a day off. Why couldn't this have been held on a Saturday or Sunday?
Air Cascadia is a very rough and unpolished program that leaves me tuning to OPB or just turning it off.
The choppy, emergent voice of Cris Andreae is certainly a large part in that.
If it is true that Press Watch will be axed for this then it will be an easy decision to withhold future pledges from this listener.

What happened to Presswatch?

Is Air Cascadia taking over what Therisa has been doing? If so, I may give up my membership. First, the am news gets axed to accomodate Democracy Now, now is Presswatch going under the plow?

 

Copyright © 2012 KBOO Community Radio | Copyright Policy | Community Guidelines | Website Illustration & Design by: KMF ILLUSTRATION